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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (31 total).

American College of Medical Genetics. n.d.. Hearing loss, genetics, and your child. Bethesda, MD: American College of Medical Genetics, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides information for parents of children with hearing loss. The brochure discusses genetics and hearing loss; insurance and paying for genetic testing; what parents should do once hearing loss has been diagnosed; why it is important for children with hearing loss to be seen by a geneticist; how to prepare for the genetics appointment; and what happens at the appointment.

Contact: American College of Medical Genetics, 7220 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W., Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 718-9603 Fax: (301) 718-9604 E-mail: acmg@acmg.net Web Site: http://www.acmg.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Consumer education materials, Genes, Genetic disorders, Genetic screening, Genetic services, Genetics, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Infants

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. n.d.. Hearing loss fact sheet. [Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program], 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides information about hearing loss in children. It explains what hearing loss in children is; discusses some signs of hearing loss, what causes it, and whether it can be prevented; and what parents can do it they suspect that their child has hearing loss. The fact sheet is printed in English on one side and in Spanish on the other.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Consumer education materials, Early childhood development, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Heath services, Infant development, Infants, Prevention, Spanish language materials

Catalyst Center. [2014]. Health care reform: What's in it for children who are deaf or hard of hearing?. Logan, UT: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, 4 pp. (Health care reform: ACA fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides an overview of some of the provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that help improve access to coverage and care for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH). Topics include how consumer protections in the ACA impact children who are D/HH, provisions that help children who are D/HH receive needed health benefits, how implementation of the ACA varies by state, how the ACA supports hearing screening of infants and young children, coverage for hearing screening, and how programs and families can help improve future policies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, Utah Sate University, 2615 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, Telephone: (435) 797-3584 Web Site: http://www.infanthearing.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Consumer protection, Deafness, Health care reform, Health insurance, Hearing disorders, Infants, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Policy development, Screening, Special health care needs

Stredler Brown A, Kahn G, Houston T, DeMoss W, Quigley S, Hamren K, Peters Lalios A, Kravit D, Olsen S, Blaiser K, Edwards M, Behl D, White K, Callow-Heusser C, Ladner D. 2012-. A practical guide to the use of tele-intervention in providing listening and spoken language services to infants and toddlers who are deaf or hard of hearing. Logan, UT: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource guide provides information to programs and individuals interested in using tele-intervention (TI) to provide family-centered early intervention to families of children who are deaf/hard of hearing who have chosen a spoken language outcome. Topics include benefits and challenges, implementation of TI sessions, technology to support TI, privacy and security considerations, licensing issues, evaluating TI outcomes, and reimbursement issues for TI. Video examples and a list of related publications and resources are included.

Contact: National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, Utah Sate University, 2615 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, Telephone: (435) 797-3584 Web Site: http://www.infanthearing.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Deafness, Early intervention, Hearing disorders, Infants, Language barriers, Language development, Language therapy, Service delivery, Telecommunication devices, Telemedicine

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2011. Deaf and hard of hearing children: Federal support for developing language and literacy. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the extent of hearing loss among children, settings in which deaf and hard-of-hearing children are educated, factors that help them acquire language and literacy skills, and challenges to providing appropriate interventions for them. Background on the issue is also provided.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Children with special health care needs, Deafness, Early childhood education, Education, Hearing disorders, Language development, Literacy, Literacy education

Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health. [2010]. Strategic plan: 2011-2015. [Phoenix, AZ]: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 3 pp.

Annotation: This strategic plan for 2011-2015 discusses overarching goals and priorities for the Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health. For each priority, strategies and performance measures are described.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 150 N. 18th Ave., Suite 320, Phoenix, AZ 85007, Telephone: (602) 364-1400 Fax: (602) 364- 1495 E-mail: sjolans@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/owch/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents with special health care needs, Arizona, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Female adolescents, Health services, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Injury prevention, Obesity, Pregnancy, Prevention, Reproductive health, Transition to independent living, Women's health

National Resource Center for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention. 2010-. A resource guide for early hearing detection and intervention. Logan, UT: National Resource Center for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention,

Annotation: This e-book discusses the foundation and evolution of early hearing detection and intervention, newborn hearing screening, tracking and follow-up, assessment of young children, parent counseling in the Internet age, assistive devices, early intervention, family support and cultural competence, quality assurance and improvement, financing and sustainability, information management, and early childhood screening. Chapters can be downloaded individually and will be updated as needed. The book can also be obtained on CD. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Early Hearing Detection and Intervention, National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management, Utah State University, 2880 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, Telephone: (435) 797-3584 E-mail: mail@infanthearing.org Web Site: http://www.infanthearing.org/tas/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Early intervention, Family support, Financing, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Infants, Parent education, Parents, Quality assurance, Young children

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. [2008]. Decision guide to communication choices. [Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program], 2 p.

Annotation: This pamphlet for parents of a child who is deaf or hard of hearing helps guide parents through the steps of deciding which communication method(s) are best for their child. Steps include (1) finding a starting point, (2) identify and explore decision-making needs, and (3) plan next steps based on needs. Forms and tables to help with the process are included.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Communication, Consumer education materials, Deafness, Facilitated communication, Hearing disorders

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. [2005]. A parent's guide to hearing loss: Choices available for families of children with hearing loss. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This CD-ROM, which is intended for parents of children with newly diagnosed hearing loss, provides information about hearing loss and communication options. The CD-ROM answers questions frequently asked by parents, such as at what age parents should teach their child language, what is a cochlear implant, when is a child old enough for a cochlear implant or other assistive device, how to communicate with a child with hearing loss, and where to go for answers. The CD-ROM also includes information about programs and services for children with hearing loss.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available from the website.

Keywords: CD-ROMS, Child health, Communication, Consumer education materials, Diagnosis, Hearing disorders, Infant health

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2005. Tune in to newborn hearing screening. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2 pp. (AMCHP policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief provides information on newborn hearing screening. It introduces the issue of children born with hearing loss, discusses the state and the federal role in providing screening, and offers recommendations.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Infant health, Neonatal screening, Newborn infants, State programs

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. 2005. Just in time for families: Early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI). Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 25 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides an overview of the early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI)process, including screening before ages 1, 3 and 6 months; communication choices for families with infants who have hearing loss; and working with the infant's health care provider. A list of Web sites for more information is included. It is available in English and in Spanish.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Communication, Deafness, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Infants, Parent professional relations, Spanish language materials

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. 2005. Just in time for pediatric primary care providers: Early hearlng detection and intervention (EHDI). Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 25 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides an overview of the EHDI process, the timing or care before1, 3, and 6 months of age, communication choices, the primary care provider's role as a medical home,and risk factors for hearing loss. A list of Web sites for further information is included.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, 1600 Clifton Road, Mailstop E-88, Atlanta, GA 30333, Telephone: (404) 498-3032 Secondary Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Fax: (404) 498-3060 E-mail: ehdi@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/ehdi Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Deafness, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Infants, Parent professional relations

Minnesota Department of Health, Community and Family Health Division. 2005. Minnesota guidelines of care for families with children who have a hearing loss: A guide to information and resources. St. Paul, MN: Community and Family Health Division, Minnesota Department of Health, 91 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines, which are intended as a resource tool for Minnesota families with a child who is deaf or has hearing loss, contain information about hearing, hearing loss, and medical and educational interventions; child development; tips for parents; definitions; and resources. The guidelines provide information about connecting with other families of children with hearing loss, understanding clinical procedures and health professionals' roles, choosing communication methods, understanding and finding services, locating financial assistance and insurance coverage, accessing educational services, understanding parents' and children's rights, and finding support systems and programs. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Division of Community and Family Health, MN Telephone: (651) 201-3589 E-mail: health.cfhcommunications@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/cfh Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Children's rights, Communication, Deafness, Educational programs, Families, Family support programs, Guidelines, Health care services, Health insurance, Hearing disorders, Intervention, Parent rights

Academy for Educational Development. 2005. Opening doors: Technology and communication options for children with hearing loss. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents of children with hearing loss is designed to help parents connect with services and groups that can help. The brochure provides facts about hearing loss in infants and children, discusses early intervention, and provides information about where to turn, about technological innovations that can help infants and children with hearling loss, and about exploring communication options. A list of groups that can help parents of children with hearing loss, along with contact information, is included.

Contact: U.S. Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Department of Education, , 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202-7100, Telephone: (202) 245-7468 Secondary Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Fax: E-mail: customerservice@inet.ed.gov Web Site: http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/osers/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Communication, Consumer education materials, Early intervention, Health services, Hearing disorders, Infants with special health care needs, Support groups

Wisconsin Newborn Screening Program. 2005. These tests could save your baby's life!. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Newborn Screening Program, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure for parents of newborns provides information about newborn screening conducted to detect hidden disorders. The brochure explains what newborn screening is, how it is done, and its purpose. The brochure also discusses what hidden disorders are, why screening is important, whether parents can elect not to have their infant screened, screening costs, what happens to blood samples, whether infants can be screening for other disorders, and where to go for more information. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Wisconsin Newborn Screening Laboratory, University of Wisconsin at Madison, 465 Henry Mall, Madison, WI 53706, Telephone: (608) 262-1293 Fax: (608) 262-3257 Web Site: http://www.slh.wisc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer information materials, Disorders, Genetic disorders, Genetic screening, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Infant health, Neonatal screening, Screening tests, Spanish language materials

Michigan Department of Community Health, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program. 2004. Services for children who are deaf or hard of hearing: A guide to resources for families and providers. [Rev. ed.]. Lansing, MI: Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, Michigan Department of Community Health, 99 pp.

Annotation: This guide for parents of children with hearing loss provides information that can help parents connect with other families, explore communication choices for their children, find out about services, locate possible financial assistance, learn how to access educational services, learn about their rights as a parent of a child with hearing loss, and find community support systems and programs. Background information is provided, as is information on universal newborn hearing screening, early intervention, and state and national resources. Five appendices include a glossary, information about hearing aids, a list of resource materials, a list of audiological assessment sites, a list of local resources, and a directory of educational services. An index of organizations and agencies is also included. The guide is also available from the Web site in Spanish.

Contact: Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Capitol View Building, 201 Townsend Street, Lansing, MI 48913, Telephone: (517) 373-3740 Web Site: http://www.michigan.gov/mdhhs Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Consumer education materials, Deafness, Early intervention, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Infant health, Resource materials, Services, Spanish language materials

National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. 2003. When a newborn doesn't pass the hearing screening: How medical and other health professionals can help increase the number of infants who return for a follow-up evaluation. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, 10 pp. (NIDCD fact sheet)

Annotation: This report, which is geared toward health professionals, discusses the common problem of failure to return for a follow-up examination among infants who are identified with hearing loss. The report aims to provide information to reduce the extent of this problem. The report addresses the following issues: (1) why don't some parents return for a follow-up examination? and (2) what all parents need to know before the leave the hospital. A list of free publications from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders is included, as are lists of resources for parents of a child with hearing loss, support services, general information and referral services, communication options, and clinical studies. The document is also available from the Web site in Spanish.

Contact: National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Information Clearinghouse, One Communication Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20892-3456, Telephone: (800) 241-1044 Secondary Telephone: (800) 241-1055 Fax: (301) 770-8977 E-mail: nidcdinfo@nidcd.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Infant health, Parents, Spanish language materials

Burke W, Fryer-Edwards K, Pinsky LE, eds. 2001. Genetics in primary care (GPC): Training program curriculum materials. (Rev. ed.). Austin, TX: National Newborn Screening and Genetics Resource Center, 146 pp. (Genetics in primary care (GPC): A faculty development initiative)

Annotation: This curriculum is designed to serve as a bridge between primary care and genetics. The curriculum includes modules focusing on the following eight areas: (1) breast/ovarian cancer, (2) cardiovascular disease, (3) colorectal cancer, (4) congenital hearing loss, (5) dementia, (6) developmental delay, (7) iron overload, and (8) ethical, legal, and social issues. Each module includes teaching cases with questions and discussion to illustrate genetic themes and diagnoses. Each module also includes references to key documents and useful Web sites for additional background information. An overview of the Genetics in Primary Care (GPC) program and a list of its members from 1998-2001 are provided. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Newborn Screening and Genetics Resource Center, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 1912 West Anderson Lane, Suite 210, Austin, TX 78757, Telephone: (512) 454-6419 Fax: (512) 454-6509 E-mail: therrell@uthscsa.edu Web Site: http://genes-r-us.uthscsa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Cardiovascular disease, Colon cancer, Curricula, Developmental disabilities, Ethics, Genetics, Hearing disorders, Iron overload diseases, Legal issues, Mental disorders, Ovarian cancer, Primary care, Professional education materials

Feagans L. 1998. Otitis media in day care: Effects on language/attention [Final report]. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University,

Annotation: This 5-year study was designed to determine whether there was a causal relationship between otitis media observed in a day care setting and developmental delays in language and attention. Otitis media is the second most frequent reason parents take their children to a physician. Although antibiotic regimens have helped to reduce the acute phase of the disease, there is no really effective therapy for the fluid that often remains in the middle ear after the acute phase is over. This fluid is associated with a mild to moderate hearing loss. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-149221.

Keywords: Attention Deficit Disorders, Audiometry, Child Care, Delayed Development, Hearing Loss, Illnesses in Child Care, Language Disorders, MCH Research, Otitis Media, Preschool Children, Research

Roberts JE. 1997. Otitis media in children and later language and learning. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 9 pp. (Research roundtable summary; no. 13)

Annotation: This report summarizes a Maternal and Child Health Bureau funded project presented at a seminar February 26, 1997. The project examines the relationship between otitis media with effusion in children and its associated hearing loss during early childhood with the development of language and learning during the preschool years. The report ends with reaction to the project and a list of publications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Photocopy available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Evaluation methods, Hearing disorders, Language development, Learning, MCH research, Otitis media, Preschool children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.