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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (2,973 total).

Magrab P, Elder J, Kazuk E, Pelosi J, Wiegerink R. n.d.. Developing a community team: A companion to the community workbook for collaborative services to preschool handicapped children. Washington, DC: American Association of University Affiliated Programs for the Developmentally Disabled, 39 pp. (Workbook series for providing services to children with handicaps and their families)

Annotation: This book explains the steps needed to plan and implement collaboration between community programs, agencies and individuals who provides services to children with disabilities and their families. This book was reprinted by the Georgetown University Child Development Center as a part of the Workbook Series for Providing Services to Children with Handicaps and Their Families.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Community based services, Interagency cooperation

National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. n.d.. Infancy in the eighties: Social policy and the earliest years of life. Washington, DC: National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, 20 pp.

Annotation: This small pamphlet summarizes new knowledge about infant and toddler development and its impact on public policy. New research findings and clinical experience can be used to increase the effectiveness of legislation affecting children and families, programs for health screening, disease prevention and related issues for families, and public and private policies toward parents in the workplace.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Contact Phone: (202) 638-0840 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org

Keywords: Family support services, Health policy, Infant health services, Policy development

Bronheim S, Fiel S, Schidlow D, MagrabP, Boczar K, Dillon C. n.d.. Crossings: A manual for transition of chronically ill youth to adult health care. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 52 pp.

Annotation: This manual is intended as a guide for health professionals to establish a new health care delivery system for transitioning adolescents with chronic illness to adult health care. Health professionals learn about eight objectives: exploring one's commitment to transition, identification of initial partners; securing institutional support; assuring economic feasibility, developing a structure, developing a successful partnership, and achieving a successful transfer of patients. A self-assessment form is included.

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Price unknown.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Health services, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Transitions, Young adults

Prendergast A. n.d.. Planning comprehensive health services for the chronically ill/handicapped child: Need for nutrition component. Cincinnati, OH: Educational Television Services, 1 videotape.

Pittsburgh/Allegheny County Healthy Start. n.d.. Guidebook for healthy mothers, children, families. Pittsburgh, PA: Allegheny County Healthy Start Project, 70 pp.

Annotation: This directory lists a variety of programs and services in the Pittsburgh area that are available to mothers, children, and families. It also contains health tips and fact sheets for infant care. Topics include the following: 1) child health clinics; 2) dental health; 3) family health services; 4) family/home-based support services; 5) family planning services; 6) family support centers; 7) grief support; 8) health and safety programs; and 9) Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Pittsburgh/Allegheny & Fayette County Healthy Start, 400 North Lexington Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA Telephone: (412) 247-1000 Secondary Telephone: (412) 247-4009 Contact Phone: (412) 578-8003 Fax: (412) 578-8325 Contact E-mail: 104626@compuserv.com Web Site: http://healthystartpittsburgh.org/ Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Case management, Child care services, Community programs, Family centered services, Family planning, Family support services, Infant health, Outreach, Pittsburgh Healthy Start, Social services

Boston Healthy Start Initiative. n.d.. Outline of BHSI's pilot nurturing program presently funded through the Carnegie Foundation known as Connect the DOTS. Boston, MA: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 33 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes a pilot family nurturing program, in which parents and children attend a series of classes together. In outline form, the manual explains how the pilot program works and how it is implemented, the philosophy and constructs behind the program, the timeline and budget for the program, and an evaluation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 1010 Massachusetts Avenue, Second Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 534-5395 Secondary Telephone: (617) 534-9799 Contact Phone: (617) 534-7828 Fax: (617) 534-5358 E-mail: healthystart@bphc.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Boston Healthy Start, Community based services, Community programs, Facilitating services, Family relations, Family support services, Outreach, Parent education programs, Training materials

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

McIntire MS, Mitchell JR. n.d.. Comprehensive health care delivery for children and youth: A combined approach. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 7 pp. (Comment series no: 2-1 (41))

Annotation: This paper reports a Children and Youth Project conducted by combining the forces of a medical school and a health department, by maintaining role differentiation in respect to education and service, and by developing a Central Health Record and communication system to develop and increase comprehensive health services for children and youth residing in the target areas of poverty. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Comprehensive health services, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

Gedgoud JL, McIntire MS. n.d.. Progress report of a combined approach for children and youth services. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project Staff, 11 pp. (Comment series no: 3-2 (45))

Annotation: This report demonstrates graphically how a combination of a health department and a medical school compress to the national average of all Children and Youth projects. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs Comprehensive health services, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Communication, Interagency cooperation, Medical records, Medical schools, Poverty, Program evaluation, Public health agencies, Title V programs

De Geyndt W. n.d.. Evaluation of health programs: An annotated bibliography. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 107 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (9))

Annotation: This bibliography is a revision and updating of comment series no. 7-9 (4) with the addition new sources and annotations for all sources. This publication supersedes the previous non-annotated bibliography, "Bibliography on Evaluation of Health Programs." This is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: .Comprehensive health care, Adolescent health programs, Bibliographies, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Federal MCH programs, Health services, Program evaluation, Title V programs

Weckwerth VE. n.d.. The comprehensive hardware store: An analogy prepared in response to a request for the difference between comprehensive health care and other care. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 6 pp. (Comment series no.: 8-9 (10))

District of Columbia Healthy Start Project. n.d.. Resource parents' home visiting guide. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, 22 pp.

Annotation: This reference document is supplementary to the formal class training a resource mother receives in preparation for the job. It is intended as an organizer and a reminder of information to be covered for each monthly home visit. Each monthly section contains the following: a list of goals for the visit; materials needed; a sample dialogue; step-by-step guide; and follow-up steps. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Phone: (202) 562-3046 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge.

Keywords: District of Columbia, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Infant mortality, Paraprofessional, Parent support services, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Reference materials, Resource mothers

Great Expectations. n.d.. Great Expectations adolescent services. New Orleans, LA: Great Expectations, 7 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet describes the adolescent center services of Great Expectations. It includes the center policy, purpose, goals and a description of the services offered for pregnant adolescents, adolescents at risk, and parenting adolescents. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Great Expectations Foundation, Inc., 4298 Elysian Fields Avenue, Suite B, New Orleans, LA 70122, Telephone: (504) 288-7818 Contact Phone: (504) 897-1049 Fax: (504) 288-7328 E-mail: arichard@greatexp.org Web Site: Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent health services, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Healthy Start, Louisiana, adolescent center services

District of Columbia Healthy Start Project. n.d.. Male Outreach Worker (MOW) case management protocol. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, 17 pp.

Annotation: This document gives an overview of the Male Outreach Worker (MOW) program in Washington DC. This program addresses the needs of fathers of infants in the Healthy Start program so that they may contribute positively in the health and well-being of the mother and baby. The document describes process objectives of the program, population characteristics that demonstrate the need for the MOW program, MOW staff responsibilities, recruitment, intervention design, case management, support/curriculum group activities, and MOW and MOW supervisor professional development. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: District of Columbia Healthy Start Project, Office of Maternal and Child Health, St. Elizabeth's Campus, Cottage Seven, 2700 Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20032, Telephone: (202) 645-4174 Fax: (202) 645-5084 Available at no charge.

Keywords: Case management, District of Columbia, Family support services, Fathers, Healthy Start, Infant mortality, Outreach, Prevention programs, Protocols, Social services

Davidson L. n.d.. Demonstration Projects for Pediatric EMS Systems Components: [Final report]. Mobile, AL: University of South Alabama College of Medicine, 104 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the this project was to demonstrate effective models for the necessary components of an emergency medical services for children (EMSC) system and the integration of those components into currently operating adult-oriented systems. The project has outlined the six major components of an EMSC system: (l) System description, (2) prevention, (3) education, (4) standards of care, (5) quality assurance, and (6) research and development. The project comprised seven subprojects whose activities included educating the public, the prehospital care provider, and the rural physician about the assessment and management of pediatric emergencies; comparing the efficacy of ground versus air transport; defining the degree of psychological impairment caused by head injury; identifying the rehabilitation facilities available locally, regionally, and nationally; and increasing compliance with safety belt/child restraint legislation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103332.

Keywords: Cost-Benefit Analysis, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency medical technicians, Facilities For, First Aid, Head Injuries, Health Professionals, Paramedics, Rehabilitation, Seat Belts/Restraints for Children

Fiser D. n.d.. Demonstration Project: Emergency Medical Services for Children: [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 44 pp.

Annotation: The Arkansas Demonstration Project utilized a broad-based approach to evaluate and improve the outcome of pediatric emergencies in Arkansas. It involved interaction with many statewide agencies, including various offices of the Arkansas Department of Health and the Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The project was designed with four primary purposes: (1) Increase the level of knowledge regarding the consequences of critical illness and injury in children in the State of Arkansas; (2) improve the emergency medical services provided to those children during the project period and after, particularly to handicapped and minority children; (3) determine the effectiveness of the proposed methodologies for the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with childhood illness and injury; and (4) determine effective methods of imparting the knowledge gained to other States in a manner resulting in the adoption of effective programs by those States. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196947.

Keywords: Ambulances, Child Education of Health Professionals, Data Bases, Data Collection, Disabled, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), Emergency medical technicians, Minorities, Morbidity, Mortality, Networking

Nelson R. n.d.. Analysis and Expansion of Community-Based Interagency Collaborative Efforts: [Final report]. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa, 51 pp.

Annotation: This study sought to document, evaluate, and disseminate information about two community-based projects designed as models of collaborative interagency service provision for children and families. The project developed a set of recommendations for collaborative efforts, addressing procedure as well as policy and organization. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152890.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Community-Based Health Care, Family centered, Fragmentation of Services, Health Professionals, Interagency cooperation, community based care

Partridge S. n.d.. PROJECT AIMS [Final report]. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, 37 pp.

Annotation: Project AIMS worked to strengthen the capacity of Maine's service system (including P.L. 99-457 efforts) to meet the emotional health needs of young children (birth to 5 years old) and their families. The project objectives were to: (1) Establish a multidisciplinary network of project associates; (2) develop and field-test an emotional health brief assessment tool for children birth to 5 years old; (3) recommend to the service network methods of conducting comprehensive psychosocial assessments of children/families with emotional difficulties; and (4) strengthen treatment services which facilitate attachment, interaction, mastery, and support within families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158608.

Keywords: 99-457, Community-Based Health Services, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Emotional Health, High risk children, High risk groups: Families, L, P, Parent-Child Interaction, Screening Tools

Force J. n.d.. Project Copernicus [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 15 pp.

Annotation: Project Copernicus, a dual-State initiative for Maryland and Virginia, developed, demonstrated, and evaluated training programs in family-centered service coordination with target groups of professional service providers and parents in urban, rural, and suburban areas of Maryland and Virginia. Project Copernicus demonstrated how to provide family-centered care for families with children with special health needs by assisting both parents and professional service providers to develop and use family-centered service coordination activities (case management). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121859.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, CSHCN, Case Management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Coordination of Health Care, Disabled, Education of Health Professionals, Families, Family-Centered Health Care, Fragmentation of Services, Parent Education, Parents, programs

Schaller J. n.d.. The Affiliated Children's Arthritis Centers of New England [Final report]. Boston, MA: New England Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 52 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to improve the health care delivered to children with rheumatic diseases in New England. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158707.

Keywords: Arthritis, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Coordinated care, Interdisciplinary teams, Rheumatic diseases

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.