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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2017. HRSA oral health: Across the agency. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document offers information about federal programs that provide funding to health centers, states, academic institutions, and other entities to recruit, train, and retain health professionals, including dentists and dental hygienists, in efforts to increase access to oral health care. The document also highlights program efforts to establish benchmarks for the nation’s oral health status and for oral health care and to ensure that oral health care is available to people living with HIV/AIDS; mothers, children, and adolescents, including those with special health care needs; and those who receive care at health centers.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Benchmarking, Children, Community health centers, Federal programs, HIV infected patients, Health care delivery, Health occupations, Health status, Low income groups, MCH services, Mothers, Oral health, Primary care, Quality assurance, Recruitment, Service integration, Special health care needs, State MCH programs, Training, Work force, Young adults

Talib Z, Palsdottir B, Briggs M, Clithero A, Cobb NM, Marjadi B, Preston R, Williams S. 2017. Defining community-engaged health professional education: A step toward building the evidence. Washington, DC: National Academy of Medicine, 4 pp. (Discussion paper)

Annotation: This paper describes the lack of published literature analyzing learning taking place in and with communities that has a demonstrated value to that community and the factors attributable to it, and efforts to build the evidence by establishing a common definition for community-engaged health professional education that is relevant to all health professionals in all disciplines in all settings or context. Contents include elements of the definition. Topics include sustainable community-academic partnerships; collaborative design, delivery, and evaluation; and next steps for building the evidence.

Contact: National Academy of Medicine, 500 5th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, E-mail: NAMedicine@nas.edu Web Site: http://nam.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Equal opportunities, Evaluation, Goals, Health occupations, International health, Leadership, Learning, Policy development, Professional education, Public private partnerships, Strategic plans, Sustainability, Training, Underserved communities, Work force

Erikson C. 2017. Health workforce research centers: Key findings 2013–2016. Washington, DC: George Washington University, Health Workforce Institute, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of how the collective work of six health work force research centers has contributed to a better understanding of critical health work force challenges. The report describes the establishment of the centers, the evolving health work force configuration, job growth and career paths in middle- and low-skill health occupations, and work force strategies to increase access to quality health care. Topics include the effect of system-level transformations on team roles and human resources, emerging occupations, expanded roles, supply and demand, training needs, career pathways, team models and staffing arrangements, the role of technology in improving access to health care, and the relationship between training location and other factors influencing supply and utilization.

Contact: George Washington University, Health Workforce Institute, 2176 K Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-3423 Web Site: http://www.gwhwi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Careers, Educational change, Evolution, Health occupations, Models, Policy development, Professional education, Professional training, Quality assurance, Research, Role, Teamwork, Technology, Work force

Institute of Medicine, Committee on Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health. 2016. A framework for educating health professionals to address the social determinants of health. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 170 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a framework for educating health professionals to address the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, as well as the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life including economic policies, development agendas, cultural and social norms, social policies, and political systems. Contents include theoretical constructs and examples of programs and frameworks addressing elements of the social determinants of health. The framework aligns education, health, and other sectors to meet local needs in partnership with communities.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Continuing education, Cultural diversity, Evaluation, Evidence based medicine, Health occupations, Inclusive schools, Mentors, Model programs, Models, Professional education, Public health education, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, Training, Work force

Association for Prevention Teaching and Research and Healthy People Curriculum Task Force. 2015. Clinical prevention and population health curriculum framework (rev.). Washington, DC: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, 27 pp.

Annotation: This framework provides a common core of knowledge for clinical health professions about individual and population-oriented prevention and health-promotion efforts. The framework provides a content outline that is compatible with a range of learning outcomes or competencies as determined by each health profession, a structure for organizing and monitoring curricula, and a structure for communicating with and among health professions. The appendices contain models of how the framework content has been integrated into interprofessional education settings, as well as into profession-specific curricula such as oral-health-education curricula.

Contact: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, 1001 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 610, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 463-0550 Secondary Telephone: (866) 474-APTR (474-2787) Fax: (202) 463-0555 E-mail: info@aptrweb.org Web Site: http://www.aptrweb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinical medicine, Curricula, Disease prevention, Health care systems, Health occupations, Health policy, Health promotion, Health services, Preventive medicine, Professional education

Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation. 2015. Enhancing health professions education through technology: Building a continuously learning health system. New York, NY: Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes recommendations from a conference held on April 9–12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia to outline best practices for health professions schools and health care organizations related to using existing and emerging technologies to enhance health professions and promote continuous learning.

Contact: Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation, 44 East 64th Street, New York, NY 10065, Telephone: (212) 486-2424 Fax: (212) 644-0765 E-mail: info@macyfoundation.org Web Site: http://www.josiahmacyfoundation.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Health occupations, Learning, Model programs, Professional education, Technology

Meyer SM, Garr DR, Evans C, Maeshiro R. 2015. Advancing interprofessional clinical prevention and population health education: A curriculum development guide for health professions faculty. Washington, DC: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research and Healthy People Curriculum Task Force, 27 pp.

Annotation: This document for health professions education program faculty provides guidance on developing curricula focused on students' abilities to participate effectively as members of interprofessional health care teams delivering clinical prevention and population health services. Contents include examples of integrative learning strategies that address selected core competencies and content elements within the Clinical Prevention and Population Health Curriculum Framework. The content may be adapted and activities customized to an institution's specific learning environments and health professions education programs including dental medicine, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, and public health.

Contact: Association for Prevention Teaching and Research, 1001 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 610, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 463-0550 Secondary Telephone: (866) 474-APTR (474-2787) Fax: (202) 463-0555 E-mail: info@aptrweb.org Web Site: http://www.aptrweb.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinical medicine, Curriculum development, Disease prevention, Health care systems, Health occupations, Health policy, Health promotion, Health services, Preventive medicine, Professional education

National Library of Medicine. 2013–. Tox Town. Bethesda, MD: National Library of Medicine, multiple items.

Annotation: This website provides an introduction to toxic chemicals and environmental health risks that individuals may encounter in everyday life and in everyday places. Users can use the neighborhoods page to learn about the location of chemicals and their related health risks. Additional contents include curriculum units and other resources that teachers can use to stimulate classroom learning about environmental-health-related issues and careers. The resource is available in English and Spanish. A text version is also available.

Contact: National Library of Medicine, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 8600 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20894, Telephone: (301) 594-5983 Secondary Telephone: (888) 346-3656 Fax: (301) 402-1384 E-mail: custserv@nlm.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nlm.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Chemicals, Curricula, Environmental health, Health occupations, Multimedia, Neighborhoods, Risk factors, Toxicology

Werner D. 2013. Where there is no doctor: A village health care handbook. (Rev. ed.). Palo Alto, CA: Hesperian Foundation, 446 pp.

Annotation: This handbook was written for those who live far from medical centers, in places where there is no doctor, particularly for those living in poor countries and in isolated villages and communities. Intended for the community health worker, it can be used by any individual. A wide range of practical health care knowledge is covered. Chapters include: words to the village health worker; sicknesses that are often confused; how to examine a sick person; how to take care of sick person; right and wrong use of modern medicines; instructions and precautions for injections; first aid; nutrition; prevention; some very common sicknesses; serious illnesses that need special medical attention; skin problems; the eyes; the urinary tract and the genitals; information for mothers and midwives; family planning; health and sickness of children; health and sickness of older people; and the medicine kit. A separate section lists uses, dosages, and precautions for medicines. A glossary of medical terms, addresses for teaching materials, and tear out sheets for making medical reports and dosage instructions for people who cannot read are also included.

Contact: Hesperian, 1919 Addison Street, Suite 304 , Berkeley, CA 94704, Telephone: (510) 845-1447 Secondary Telephone: (888) 729-1796 Fax: (510) 845-9141 E-mail: hesperian@hesperian.org Web Site: http://www.hesperian.org/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Allied health occupations, Child health services, Community health workers, Developing countries, Disease prevention, Education, First aid, Health services, Maternal health services, Nutrition

Randall T. 2010. The outreach sourcebook: Rural health care services outreach program. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 90 pp.

Annotation: This report describes Rural Health Outreach Demonstration Grant projects throughout the states and the U.S. Territories of Palau and the Virgin Islands. The core requirement for all demonstration projects was the formation of a consortium by three or more local institutions to address the problems of local health care and health education. Approximately two-thirds of the projects were aimed at women, children, or adolescents. Rural minorities were the target of approximately half the projects. The demonstration projects offered a variety of services in a variety of settings, including local health departments, tribal organizations, community and migrant-worker health centers, mental health organizations, community action agencies, universities, and emergency service organizations. Entries are arranged alphabetically by state and include contact information; the nature of health care in the area served; the participating organizations; and the challenges, achievements, and failures of the projects.

Contact: Rural Health Information Hub, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 501 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Room 4520, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (800) 270-1898 E-mail: info@ruralhealthinfo.org Web Site: https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health services, Allied health occupations, Child health services, Community health services, Demonstration programs, Directories, Health programs, Health services, Maternal health services, Minority health, Outreach, Rural health

American Dental Association. 2005. Resources for educating prospective dental professionals. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are designed to help teachers, career counselors, and others introduce students to careers in oral health-related professions. Contents include fact sheets about dentistry, dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology; the top ten reasons to consider dentistry; and a pre-dental timeline. A toolkit for students in grades 2–6 comprises a fill-in-the-blank handout on what dentists do and how to become a dentist, and a word search. Video clips are also available.

Contact: American Dental Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, Telephone: (312) 440-2500 Fax: (312) 440-7494 E-mail: info@ada.org Web Site: http://www.ada.org Available from the website (see order form for pricing).

Keywords: Allied health occupations, Careers, Dental hygiene, Dentistry, Multimedia, Oral health, School age children, School health education

State University of New York at Albany, School of Public Health, Center for Health Workforce Studies. 2004. A comparison of changes in the professional practice of nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and certified nurse midwives: 1992 and 2000. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 227 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the professional practice of nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and certified nurse midwives. It examines the notion that this practice varies widely across the 50 states and that favorable practice environments for the three professions are strongly associated with larger supplies of practitioners. The report (1) documents changes in professional practice of the three professions between 1992 and 2000, (2) creates new statistical professional practice indices for each of the three professions that more accurately reflect the respective practice environments across the 50 states in 2000, (3) examines the nature of the relationship between the three professions, the professional environment in which they operate, and their physician counterparts, (4) identifies salient factors that are related to changes in the three professions and their physician counterparts, and (5) assesses the extent to which the three professions improved access to care for underserved populations in the 1990s. The report includes eight appendices that contain index calculations, committee and organization lists, field work details, and references. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.

Keywords: Access to health care, Health occupations, Nurse midwives, Nurse practitioners, Physician assistants, Physicians, Underserved populations

Health Professions Partnership Initiative. 2004. Learning from others: A literature review and how-to guide from the Health Professions Partnership Initiative. Washington, DC: Association of American Medical Colleges, 42 pp.

Annotation: This guide looks at the elements of educational partnerships -- how partner relationships function and how they attempt to solve problems -- in the hopes that it will illuminate best practices in the partnership process and the programs that result. The guide approaches such partnerships from the perspective of boosting the number of African Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans in the health care field by improving the academic preparation of these minority groups and thus reducing barriers to entering training for health careers. The guide is divided into three sections. Section 1 generally explores the process of partnering. Section 2 reviews the types of strategies commonly used to increase minority student achievement, with an aim toward identifying best practices for public school and higher education health professions partnerships. Part 3 provides recommendations for implementing partnerships, program strategies, and evaluation. The contents of the guide were derived from a review of existing scholarly literature on educational partnerships from 1980 through mid-2002.

Contact: Association of American Medical Colleges, 655 K Street, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 20001-2399, Telephone: (202) 828-0400 Web Site: https://www.aamc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, American Indians, Barriers, Blacks, Collaboration, Education, Health occupations, Health personnel, Hispanic Americans, Interagency cooperation, Literature reviews, Minority groups, Students

Sullivan Commission on Diversity in the Healthcare Workforce. 2004. Missing persons: Minorities in the health professions. Durham, NC: Duke University School of Medicine, Sullivan Commission, 201 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a national blueprint for achieving diversity in the health professions. The report integrates findings from expert testimony, the health sciences literature, and two commissioned studies and puts forth recommendations for actions to address the causes of underrepresentation of minorities in the health professions. Report sections discuss the rationale for increasing diversity in the workforce, the history of disparities, the status of diversity in the health professions schools and workforce, the health professions pipeline, financing, and accountability. Appendices include reports on the two commissioned studies, the charge to the commission, information on the W. K. Kellogg grant program that supported the work, field hearing agendas, and a list of diversity resources. An executive summary and a glossary are also included.

Contact: Sullivan Alliance to Transform the Health Professions, Web Site: http://www.thesullivanalliance.org/cue/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Cultural diversity, Ethnic groups, Health education, Health occupations, Health personnel, Health services delivery, Minority groups, Recruitment

Public Health Foundation. [2001]. The key ingredient of the National Prevention Agenda: Workforce development—A companion document to Healthy People 2010. Rockville, MD: National Center for Health Workforce Information and Management, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report assists states in addressing the national workforce development objectives for the health professions and for employees of public health agencies. It is divided into four sections. The first section is a "how to" resource for planners providing seven strategy options for including workforce objectives in state Healthy People or other state health plans. The second two sections focus on national Healthy People 2010 workforce objectives involving minority representation in the health professions and continuing education for public health employees. Each section includes an issue summary, a strategy summary, and strategy examples and resources. The fourth section provides a list of Healthy People 2010 workforce-related objectives. Two appendices include a bibliography of articles and resources, and a draft list of core public health competencies from the Council on Linkages Between Academia and Public Health Practice. Endnotes conclude the report.

Contact: National Center for Health Workforce Analysis, Health Resource and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Workforce, Rockvillle, MD Telephone: (301) 443-9256 Web Site: http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Work force, Continuing education, Federal initiatives, Health occupations, Health personnel, Healthy People 2010, Minority groups, Oral health, Parents, Planning, Professional personnel, Public health, Public health agencies, State programs

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. 1999. Blending perspectives and building common ground: A report to Congress on substance abuse and child protection. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 175 pp.

Annotation: This report on substance abuse and child protection describes: (1) the extent and scope of the problem of substance abuse in the child welfare population; (2) the types of services provided to this population; (3) the effectiveness of these services; and (4) recommendations for legislative changes that might be needed to improve service coordination. Appendices provide information on Medicaid services for substance abuse treatment, the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment comprehensive treatment model for alcohol and other drug abusing women and their children, and key federal programs that fund substance abuse and child welfare services and research.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Child welfare, Collaboration, Family support, Family violence, Federal agencies, Health occupations, Intervention, Maltreated children, Prevention, Social services, Statistics, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance abusers, Substance use behavior

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Rural Health Policy. 1997. Outreach profiles on Latino-Hispanic rural health. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Rural Health Policy, 64 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information on Hispanic rural outreach projects funded between 1991 and 1995 through the Office of Rural Health Policy's Rural Health Outreach Services grants. Entries are arranged alphabetically by state and include point of contact information, a brief assessment of the health issues in a particular community, the methods used to address the issues, and an assessment of the success or lack of success of the projects.

Contact: U.S. Office of Rural Health Policy, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, 9A-55, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Contact Phone: (301) 652-5264 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/ruralhealth/ Available at no charge.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health services, Allied health occupations, Child health services, Community health services, Demonstration programs, Health services, Hispanic Americans, Maternal health services, Migrant health programs, Minority health, Outreach, Rural health

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1996. MCH program interchange: Focus on education and training. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 20 pp.

Annotation: This issue of the "MCH Program Interchange" lists materials related to education and training in maternal and child health, of both health professionals and lay audiences. It includes the following types of materials: 1) reports and studies about MCH education, and curricula to follow in providing training; 2) manuals on how to provide specific services that can be used as aids in training; 3) resource guides that list consumer education materials; and 4) consumer education pamphlets, videos, and other publications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available at no charge. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHI088.

Keywords: Child health, Consumer education, Education, Federal MCH programs, Health occupations, Local MCH programs, Maternal health, State MCH programs, Training

Grant R. 1995. Interdisciplinary collaborative teams in primary care: A model curriculum and resource guide. San Francisco, CA: Pew Health Professions Commission and California Primary Care Consortium, 126 pp.

Annotation: This manual guides educators in the creation of individualized courses on interdisciplinary collaboration in the primary care setting. It includes learning objectives, background information, annotated reference articles, and student learning exercises. The author provides case studies and examples of how this curriculum can be used in different training settings.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Healthforce Center for Research and Leadership Development, 3333 California Street, Suite 410, San Francisco, CA 94143, Telephone: (415) 476-8181 E-mail: healthforcecenter@ucsf.edu Web Site: http://healthforce.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Curricula, Education, Health occupations, Interdisciplinary approach, Manuals, Primary care, Teamwork, Training

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Public Health and Science, Office of Minority Health. 1993. Toward equality of well-being: Strategies for improving minority health—Strategic planning and coordination process. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health, 112 pp.

Annotation: This manual discusses the goals and objectives of Healthy People 2000 and presents strategies for reaching those goals that also insure the access of minorities to health care; it was developed for use by government agencies, policymakers, private and public organizations, communities, and other interested parties. The manual discusses the strategies and methods for utilizing them and reviews techniques for tracking progress toward the goals. It then presents over 500 strategies in these topical areas: cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, HIV and AIDS, infant mortality, intentional violence, and substance abuse. These cross-cutting subjects that affect the health status of minorities are also covered: access and financing, data collection and analysis, and health professions development.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Price unknown. Document Number: ISBN 0-16-04714-7.

Keywords: AIDS, Access to health care, Access to health care, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Data analysis, Data collection, Diabetes insipidus, Diabetes mellitus, HIV, Health care financing, Health occupations, Health promotion, Healthy People 2000, Infant mortality, Manuals, Minority groups, Program coordination, Program development, Strategic plans, Substance abuse, Violence

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.