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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (39 total).

Davidson L. n.d.. Demonstration Projects for Pediatric EMS Systems Components: [Final report]. Mobile, AL: University of South Alabama College of Medicine, 104 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the this project was to demonstrate effective models for the necessary components of an emergency medical services for children (EMSC) system and the integration of those components into currently operating adult-oriented systems. The project has outlined the six major components of an EMSC system: (l) System description, (2) prevention, (3) education, (4) standards of care, (5) quality assurance, and (6) research and development. The project comprised seven subprojects whose activities included educating the public, the prehospital care provider, and the rural physician about the assessment and management of pediatric emergencies; comparing the efficacy of ground versus air transport; defining the degree of psychological impairment caused by head injury; identifying the rehabilitation facilities available locally, regionally, and nationally; and increasing compliance with safety belt/child restraint legislation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103332.

Keywords: Cost-Benefit Analysis, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency medical technicians, Facilities For, First Aid, Head Injuries, Health Professionals, Paramedics, Rehabilitation, Seat Belts/Restraints for Children

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health. 2017. CDC DentalCheck: Infection prevention & control checklist application. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health, 1 v.

Annotation: This checklist is a companion to Summary of Infection Prevention Practices in Dental Settings: Basic Expectations for Safe Care. The checklist is divided into two categories: (1) policies and practices and (2) direct observation of personnel and patient-care practices. Each category is broken into subcategories, and each subcategory includes checkboxes to indicate whether an assessment has been done and space to record notes and areas for improvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/OralHealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinic administration, Disease prevention, Health facilities, Health service delivery, Infection control, Injury prevention, Mobile applications, Oral health, Patient care, Policy development, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Records management, Safety

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health. 2016. Summary of infection prevention practices in dental settings: Basic expectations for safe care. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 43 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes basic infection-prevention recommendations for all oral health care settings. Contents include information about the fundamental elements needed to prevent transmission of infectious agents and the importance of routine risk assessment. Topics include administrative measures, infection-prevention education and training, personnel safety, program evaluation, standard precautions, and water quality. The appendices contain a checklist for assessing overall policies and practices and for direct observation of personnel and patient-care practices; recommendations; and references and resources organized by topic area. A mobile application and a Spanish version of the document are also available.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Oral Health, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/OralHealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Spanish language materials, Dental care, Dental offices, Disease prevention, Health facilities, Infection control, Mobile health units, Oral health, Personnel, Professional Education, Program evaluation, Risk assessment, Safety, Standards, Training

Healthy Schools Network. 2016. Towards healthy schools: Reducing risks to children. Albany, NY: Healthy Schools Network, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report features published media reports from states on school environmental conditions. Contents include data on key characteristics of schools, staff, and poverty levels; structural support mechanisms that exist for schools at the state level; and programs available in some states to address identified external impacts on children such as food allergies, hazardous cleaning products, indoor air quality, and lead and asbestos contamination. Information from interviews with state and county environmental health directors about children and learning environments are also included.

Contact: Healthy Schools Network, 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, Telephone: (518) 462-0632 Fax: (518) 462-0433 E-mail: info@healthyschools.org Web Site: http://www.healthyschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Environmental exposure, Facilities, Financing, Mass media, Policy analysis, Public health services, Public schools, Risk factors, Safety, School age children, School health, State programs

Connecticut Department of Public Health. 2015. Statewide health care facilities and services plan: 2014 supplement. Hartford, CT: Connecticut Department of Public Health, 191 pp.

Annotation: This document provides a blueprint for health care delivery in Connecticut and a resource guide for health care facilities and services planning. Topics include the current health care environment; acute care facilities, use, and trends; at-risk and vulnerable populations and unmet needs; current initiatives to address unmet health care needs among vulnerable populations; and recommendations and next steps.

Contact: Connecticut Department of Public Health, 410 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06134-0308, Telephone: (860) 509-8000 E-mail: webmaster.dph@po.state.ct.us Web Site: http://www.ct.gov/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Connecticut, Health care delivery, Health facilities, Health services delivery, Public health, Resources for professionals, Statewide planning, Strategic plans

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2015. Area health resources files. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, multiple items.

Annotation: This family of health data resource products is drawn from a county-level database assembled annually from over 50 sources. It includes (1) databases that can be downloaded; (2) comparison tools that enable local health planners, administrators, and researchers to compare a county's or state's available health resources and health status indicators to those available from other counties or states based on selected criteria; and (3) a mapping tool that enables users to prepare maps that compare the availability of health professionals as well as environmental factors impacting health at the county and state levels. Data categories include health care professions (including dentists and other oral health professionals); hospitals and health care facilities; and census, population data, and environment. Selected national and state data not available for smaller geographic areas are included.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data sources, Health facilities, Health professions, Health status, Hospitals

Dougherty RH, Strod D. 2014. Building consensus on residential measures: Recommendations for outcome and performance measures. Lexington, MA: DMA Health Strategies, 18 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This paper reviews efforts to promote consensus on outcome and performance measures and youth/family outcomes for residential programs for youth and families. The paper summarizes various instruments that have been tested, identifies measurement strategies for child and family serving systems and residential programs to implement, presents a proposed core set of measures, and outlines steps to be taken in a consensus-building process for review of the measures.

Contact: DMA Health Strategies, 9 Meriam Street, Suite 4, Lexington, MA 02420, Telephone: (800) 814-7802 E-mail: mail@dmahealth.com Web Site: http://www.dmahealth.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care systems, Measures, Outcome evaluation, Residential care, Residential facilities, Residential programs, Service delivery systems

Seidelman E, Gower K, Bradberry A. 2014. Successful initiatives to limit formula marketing in health care facilities. Washington, DC: Public Citizen, 31 pp.

National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care. 2013. Stepping stones to caring for our children: National health and safety performance standards–Guidelines for early care and education programs: Protecting children from harm (3rd ed.). Denver, CO: University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care, 151 pp.

Annotation: This booklet contains 138 standards to advance the quality and safety of early care and education environments. It is a companion to Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards -- Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, 3rd edition (CFOC3). The booklet comprises a subset of the standards contained in CFO3, including new and updated standards on safe sleep, handling and feeding of human milk, introducing solid foods to infants, monitoring children's development, unimmunized children, preventing expulsions, and availability of drinking water. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care centers, Children with special health care needs, Facilities, Health promotion, Learning activities, Management, Nutrition, Out of home care, Personnel, Safety, Spanish language materials, Standards

Babey SH, Wolstein J, Krumholz S, Robertson B, Diamant AL. 2013. Physical activity, park access and park use among California adolescents. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 7 pp. (Healthy policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief examines park access and park use by adolescents in California as a way to meet the recommendation that young people engage in 60 minutes of physical activity at least five days a week. The brief provides statistics on the number of California teens who fail to meet the physical activity guidelines, highlighting differences in behavior based on income and proximity to park facilities. The authors provide policy recommendations to invest in amenities and recreational programming at existing parks; develop agreements that allow community use of school grounds during off-hours, especially in low income neighborhoods; and target efforts to improve access and safety in low-income neighborhoods where there are few if any parks.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, California, Guidelines, Physical activity, Policy development, Program improvement, Recreational facilities, Recreational services, State surveys

National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education. 2013. Stepping Stones to Caring for Our Children, 3rd Edition Compliance/comparsion checklist. Aurora, CO: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, 8 pp.

Annotation: This checklist is designed to help multiple audiences assess whether a child care program complies with national health and safety standards. Topics include staffing; program activities and healthy development; health promotion and protection; nutrition and food service; facilities supplies, equipment, and environmental health; play areas, playgrounds, and transportation; infectious disease; policies; and licensing and community action. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education, University of Colorado Denver, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Mail Stop F541, P.O. Box 6511, Aurora, CO 80045, Telephone: (800) 598-5437 (598-KIDS) Fax: (303) 724-0960 E-mail: info@nrckids.org Web Site: http://nrckids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care facilities, Child health, Guideline adherence, Health policy, Regulations, Safety, Standards

Dawkins-Lyn N, Jacobs E, Cheung K, Revels M, Carver L, Krol D. 2013. Dental professionals in non-dental settings. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 32 pp. (Synthesis report)

Annotation: This report focuses on nine oral health innovations seeking to increase access to preventive oral health care in non-oral-health settings. Topics include a description of program settings (Head Start programs, schools, and senior center and other residential facilities) and strategies used in service delivery (referral systems, work force adaptations, funding mechanisms, consent procedures, telehealth technology, and incentives).

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adults, Head Start, Model programs, Oral health, Prevention services, Residential facilities, School age children, Schools, Service delivery systems, Work force, Young children

Gold RB, Zakheim M, Schulte JM, Wood S, Beeson T, Rosenbaum S. 2011. A natural fit: Collaborations between community health centers and family planning clinics. Washington, DC: George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Department of Health Policy, Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative, 19 pp. (Policy research brief no. 26)

Annotation: This paper discusses federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and family planning clinics funded through Title X of the Public Health Service Act and how they stand to benefit from the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009. The paper describes both FQHCs and family planning clinics and who they serve and delineates the level of increased funding they can expect to receive. FQHCs' and family planning clinics' complementary strengths, the policy environment, and potential collaboration are discussed.

Contact: George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy, 950 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W., Sixth Floor, Washington, DC 20052, Telephone: (202) 994-4100 Web Site: http://publichealth.gwu.edu/departments/health-policy Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Family planning, Family planning clinics, Financing, Health facilities, Legislation, Low income groups, Public policy, Women's health

McDonald KM, Schutz E, Albin L, Pineda N, Lonhart J, Sundaram V, Smith-Spangler C, Brustrom J, Malcolm E. 2010. Care coordination measures atlas. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 280 pp.

Annotation: This atlas lists existing measures of care coordination and presents a framework for understanding care coordination measurement. The atlas is designed to help evaluators identify appropriate measures for assessing care coordination interventions in research studies and demonstration projects, particularly those measures focusing on care coordination in ambulatory care. The atlas explains what care coordination is; provides various perspectives on it; and includes examples of care coordination scenarios. It also describes how to lay out information about care coordination using a measure mapping table developed to show the intersection of care coordination domains and measurement perspectives. Appendices include measure mapping procedures, examples of measure mapping, sources for identifying measures, and guidelines on measurement selection.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Ambulatory care facilities, Evaluation, Health care systems, Measures, Primary care, Service coordination

U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care. 2008. Health centers: America's primary care safety net—Reflections on successes, 2002-2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the U.S. health center program history; the role in providing a health care home; the model of care used; and how connections are sustained between primary care associations, offices, and other partners. It also describes the unprecedented growth of the health center program from 2002 to 2007 and outlines future issues in work force, health information technology, emergency management, quality, and performance measurement. Program successes are also discussed.

Contact: U.S. Bureau of Primary Health Care, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 489-4772 Fax: (301) 480-4098 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/about/organization/bureaus/bphc/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Community health centers, National programs, Primary care facilities, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Public health services

DC Action for Children, Children's Advocacy Roundtable. 2007. KidBits: Using data to drive better outcomes for children and youth. Washington, DC: DC Action for Children, Children's Advocacy Roundtable, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from the first annual assessment of indicators in each of the District of Columbia's six citywide goals for children and youth to provide officials and the general public with an objective look at how well the city is (or, in some cases, is not) meeting the needs of children, youth, and their families. The snapshot presents basic data, brief assessments, and recommendations in the following areas: school readiness, school success, healthy children and youth, youth opportunity, stable families, and transitioning to adulthood.

Contact: DC Action for Children, 1616 P Street, N.W., Suite 420, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 234-9404 Fax: (202) 234-9108 E-mail: dcaction@dckids.org Web Site: http://www.dcactionforchildren.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent health, Adolescents, Advocacy, Assessment, Child health, Children, District of Columbia, EPSDT, Facilities, Families, Family health, School readiness, Statistical data, Transition to independent living

Massachusetts Consortium for Children with Special Health Care Needs, Care Coordination Work Group. 2005. Care coordination: Definitions and principles (rev. ed.). Boston, MA: Care Coordination Work Group, Massachusetts Consortium for Children with Special Health Care Needs, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents definitions and principles associated with care coordination for children and youth with special health care needs and their families. The fact sheet offers a definition of care coordination; presents several principles of care coordination, including accessibility, individualization, and aligning with the family; discusses outcomes of care coordination; and presents the stages of the care coordination process and associated activities.

Contact: New England SERVE, 101 Tremont Street, Suite 812, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 574-9493 Fax: (617) 574-9608 Available from the website.

Keywords: Accessible facilities, Adolescents with special health care needs, Children with special health care needs, Families, Guidelines, Program coordination, Service coordination

Babey SH, Brown ER, Hastert TA. 2005. Access to safe parks helps increase physical activity among teenagers. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 6 pp. (Health policy research brief)

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on neighborhood characteristics that influence whether and how much adolescents engage in physical activity, based on data from the 2003 California Health Interview Survey. The brief discusses (1) lower levels of physical activity among urban adolescents and low-income adolescents, and how access to parks helps, (2) adolescent physical activity related to type of housing and access to parks, and (3) relationship between adolescent physical activity and perceptions of neighborhood safety. Conclusions and policy recommendations are included. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: PB2005-10.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, California, Housing, Low income groups, Neighborhoods, Physical activity, Recreational facilities, Recreational safety, Urban population

Hawkins D, Proser M. 2004. A nation's health at risk: A national and state report on America's 36 million people without a regular healthcare provider. Washington, DC: National Association of Community Health Centers, 27 pp. (Special topics issue brief no. 5)

Annotation: This report focuses on the 36 million Americans who lack a regular source of health care. The report describes who these people are and where they live, why having a regular source of health care is important, and how the national initiative to expand community health centers has helped meet this need.The report also describes the role of health centers in providing quality health care to vulnerable populations while producing significant cost savings for the health care system. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. Four appendices include additional statistical information. Endnotes are included.

Contact: National Association of Community Health Centers, 7501 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1100W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 347-0400 Web Site: http://nachc.org

Keywords: Access to health care, Community health centers, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Health facilities, Initiatives, Low income groups, National programs, Rural health, Rural population, Underserved communities

Regenstein M, Nolan L, Wilson M, Mead H, Siegel B. 2004. Walking a tightrope: The state of the safety net in ten U.S. communities. Washington, DC: George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, 54 pp. (Urgent matters)

Annotation: This summary report assesses the state of America's health care safety net, a term that has come to refer broadly to public hospitals, community health centers, public health departments, faith-based clinics, and others who, either by mission or mandate, provide significant amounts of health care to people who are uninsured or underinsured and who cannot cover the costs of care from their own resources. Ten communities across the country were assessed: Memphis, TN; Detroit, MI; Phoenix, AZ; San Diego, CA; Lincoln, NE; Boston, MA; Queens, NY; Fairfax County, VA; San Antonio, TX; and Atlanta, GA. Chapter contents include descriptions of the following from the ten communities studied: structure and financing, availability of services for uninsured and underserved patients, results from focus group meetings with residents in the ten communities, care and use of emergency departments of hospitals in the areas studied, and key findings and strategies for strengthening the safety net. The report also contains an executive summary, end notes, and reports on the assessment including partners and contact information. Separate and detailed reports are provided for each of the ten communities. Statistical information is provided in charts, tables, and graphs throughout the summary and in each individual community report.

Contact: Urgent Matters, 2121 K Street, N. W., Suite 210, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-8642 Fax: (202) 973-1150 E-mail: info@urgentmatters.org Web Site: http://www.urgentmatters.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Arizona, California, Clinics, Georgia, Health agencies, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Health facilities, Health programs, Health services delivery, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, Program evaluation, Public health programs, Public hospitals, Tennessee, Texas, Underserved communities, Uninsured persons, Virginia

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.