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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 10 (10 total).

Grantmakers in Health. 2019. Building an evidence-base for gun violence prevention: Research and data needs. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue focus discusses federal research restrictions on gun violence prevention, status of the evidence base, and priorities for future research. It also lists examples of programs on this issue that are funded privately.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Firearm safety, Gun control, Research, Violence prevention

Children's Defense Fund. 2014. The state of America's children. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, irregular.

Annotation: This series of reports is a compilation and analysis of national and U.S. state-by-state data on child population, child poverty, family structure, family income, housing and homelessness, hunger and nutrition, health, early childhood, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and gun violence. Changes in key child and national well-being indicators are included.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Education, Ethnic groups, Family characteristics, Gun violence, High risk groups, Population surveillance, Poverty, Trends

Children's Safety Network. 2013. Law and policy issues in reducing firearm violence among children and teens: The role of public health. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network,

Annotation: This webinar focuses on law and policy issues in reducing firearm violence among children and adolescents. It addresses the scope of the problem of intentional and unintentional firearm-related injuries among teens and children; best practices, policies, and programs for reducing firearm-related injuries; commonly used practices, policies, and programs that have not proven to be effective; and the challenges in public health law related to firearms and what they mean for practitioners. The webinar was cosponsored by the Children's Safety Network and the Network for Public Health Law.

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Firearm safety, Gun violence, Injury prevention, Legislation, Policy, Public health

White House, Executive Office of the President. 2013. Now Is the Time: The President's plan to protect our children and our communities by reducing gun violence. Washington, DC: White House, Executive Office of the President, 15 pp.

Children's Defense Fund. 2012. The state of America's children handbook. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report presents key data on the health and well being of children across the United States. It provides information and statistics in areas such as child nutrition, poverty, family income, housing, health status, education, and juvenile justice, and presents tables that compare how children are faring in each state. Included are statistics based on the age, race, and ethnicity of children. Comparisons between the state of children in America and those in other industrialized nations are also provided. The report is intended to help inform and enable those who care about children to effectively stand up and advocate for them.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child health, Child nutrition, Child welfare, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Education, Family characteristics, Gun violence, High risk groups, Population surveillance, Poverty, Statistics

Braga AA. 2004. Gun violence among serious young offenders. Washington, DC: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, 60 pp. (Problem-oriented guides for police; problem-specific guides series; no. 23)

Annotation: This guide addresses serious youth gun violence, describing the problem and reviewing factors that increase the risk of the problem occurring. It then presents a series of questions that might help readers analyze a local gun violence problem. Finally, the guide reviews responses to the problem and what is known about these responses based on evaluative research and police practice. The guide includes one appendix: summary of responses to gun violence among serious young offenders. The guide also includes endnotes, references, an about-the-author section, and a list of recommended readings.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, 1100 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20530, Telephone: (800) 421-6770 E-mail: askCopsRC@usdoj.gov Web Site: http://www.cops.usdoj.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-932582-31-2.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Child behavior, Communities, Gun violence, High risk adolescents, High risk children, Violence prevention

Brown BV, Bzostek S. 2003. Violence in the lives of children. [Washington, DC]: Child Trends, 13 pp. (CrossCurrents, Issue 1)

Annotation: This brief presents information on many types of violence (including the most common forms of violence, the least common forms of violence, and other types of violence) that affect children's lives, as well as critical intersections of violence and age, gender, and race and ethnicity. The brief considers the need to collect other types of information to help monitor and track violence in the lives of America's children and adolescents. The brief also offers conclusions. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the brief. The brief concludes with a list of data sources for figures, and endnotes.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-932359-06-X.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Domestic violence, Ethnic factors, Fighting, Gun violence, Infants, Media violence, Racial factors, Sexual abuse, Sexual assault, Suicide, Violence, Violence prevention, Weapons

David and Lucile Packard Foundation. 2002. Children, youth, and gun violence. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 176 pp., exec. summ. (4 pp.). (The future of children; v. 12, no. 2, Summer/Fall 2002)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" focuses on youth gun violence in the United States, examining the impact of such violence upon children, families, and communities, and exploring policies that aim to reduce gun deaths and injuries to children and youth. The articles summarize the knowledge and research about how gun violence affects children and youth, and which policies hold promise for reducing youth gun violence. Also, program strategies are reviewed including efforts to change behavior regading gun ownership and storage among parents; engaging law enforcement and community leaders in anti-gun violence efforts; altering the design of guns to make them harder for children to use; and tightening laws refgarding gun sales to reduce youth access to guns. The issue also provides sections on federal firearm laws, a list of acronyms, and a selected bibliography. Each article includes endnotes and statistical information provided in narrative, graph, chart, and table formats.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Children, Crime, Firearm safety, Gun violence, Injury prevention, Mortality, Program evaluation, Statistics, Weapons, Youth

Riess AJ Jr, Roth JA, eds. 1993. Understanding and preventing violence. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 464 pp.

Annotation: In this book, comprised of 15 different papers, a panel of experts assimilate the diverse research on the patterns and characteristics of violent behavior in the United States, including behaviors that have only recently been recognized as crimes, such as incest and spousal and elder abuse. The book describes what is known about certain types of violence, details insights into risk factors for violent behavior in individuals and situations, and recommends new research efforts with short and long term payoffs. The authors also propose some answers, such as several preventive strategies for reducing firearm-related violence, that rely on existing laws. Tables and figures are included as well as author and panel biographies, references and an index.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Contact Phone: (800) 624-6242 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use, Behavioral sciences, Child abuse, Crime, Crime, Drug use, Elder abuse, Family violence, Firearms, Gun control, Legislation, Media violence, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse, Sexual assault, Statistics, Substance use, Weapons

Zero to Three/National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. 1992. Can they hope to feel safe again?: The impact of community violence on infants, toddlers, their parents and practitioners. Arlington, VA: Zero to Three/National Center for Clinical Infant Programs , 31 pp.

Annotation: This booklet contains edited presentations given at the final plenary session of the Seventh Biennial National Training Institute. The presenters are: Clementine Barfield, Elizabeth Simpson, Betsy McAllister Groves and Joy Osofsky. All the presentations deal with the effects of violence on the very young.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Contact Phone: (800) 899-4301 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $5.00. Document Number: ISBN 0-943657-26-1.

Keywords: Child safety, Community action, Community participation, Domestic violence, Family violence, Gun violence, Posttraumatic stress disorder, School violence, Violence, Violence prevention, Young children

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.