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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (25 total).

Healthy Foster Care America. 2014-. Trauma guide. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, multiple items.

Annotation: This guide for pediatricians comprises a series of six documents on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the process of asking families about exposure to ACEs or other traumatic events. The guide also provides resources on helping families with foster and adoptive children cope with trauma. Materials for families are included. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Healthy Foster Care America, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (800) 433-9016, x4273 or x7119 Fax: (847) 228-7320 E-mail: fostercare@aap.org Web Site: http://www.aap.org/fostercare Available from the website.

Keywords: Adopted children, Adoptive parents, Adverse effects, Children, Families, Foster children, Foster parents, Pediatric care, Primary care, Resources for professionals, Trauma, Vulnerability

Center for the Study of Social Policy. 2014. Expectant and parenting youth in foster care: A resource guide. Washington, DC; New York, NY: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 95 pp.

Annotation: This compendium lists programs, interventions, and initiatives that are evidence-informed and those that hold promise for serving expectant and parenting youth and their children within foster care systems. The contents are organized into three major categories: parenting supports, developmental supports for children and parents, and preparation for adulthood. Each entry includes the name of the program, initiative, intervention, or training curriculum; results that the program, intervention, initiative, or training curriculum attempts to achieve; the target population; a description; the source of the evidence-informed clearinghouse; evidence of effectiveness; a location; and the website source or key contact for more information. Related resources such as fact sheets, reports, toolkits, and guides are also included.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Curricula, Foster care, Intervention, Model programs, Pregnant adolescents, Program evaluation, Resources for professionals, Training

American Academy of Pediatrics, Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. 2013. Trauma guide. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics; [Columbus, OH]: Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, 4 items.

Annotation: These materials for pediatricians provide information on how to support adoptive and foster families who have experienced trauma. The materials include a guide focused on how to help families cope with trauma, a tip sheet about codes to use for evaluations involving screening and anticipatory guidance related to trauma and other mental health and developmental concerns, a discharge form and referral summary, and a guide for families about parenting after trauma.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Parenting skills, Adopted children, Adoptive parents, Developmental problems, Families, Foster children, Foster parents, Mental health, Pediatricians, Referrals, Resource materials, Trauma

Forkey H, Garner A, Nalven L, Schilling S, Stirling J. 2013. Helping foster and adoptive families cope with trauma. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 items.

Annotation: This guide provides information to help pediatricians support adoptive and foster families who are coping with trauma. The guide helps pediatricians identify traumatized children, educate families, and empower families; provides coding tips that pediatricians may use for evaluations involving screening and anticipatory guidance related to trauma and other mental health or developmental concerns; provides a discharge form to give to families; and includes a guide for parents about parenting after trauma.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adopted children, Adoptive parents, Child development, Children, Clinical coding, Coping, Families, Family support services, Foster children, Foster parents, Mental health, Parenting skills, Screening, Trauma

Golden O, Emam D. 2013. How health care reform can help children and families in the child welfare system: Options for action. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 31 pp. (Low-income working families, paper 25)

Annotation: This paper considers the implications of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on child welfare families, specifically on youth aging out of foster care, parents and guardians of children in (or at risk of entering) the child welfare system, and children already involved in the system. It also offers potential strategies for action by state and federal child welfare and health officials, philanthropic funders, and outside expert to enhance coverage and improve care.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child welfare, Children, Expanded eligibility, Federal initiatives, Foster care, Foster parents, Health care reform, Health insurance, Low income groups, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State initiatives

Child Welfare Information Gateway. 2013. Supporting your LGBTQ youth: A guide for foster parents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 11 pp. (Factsheet for families)

Annotation: This fact sheet for families provides information about how foster parents can support lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth. The fact sheet provides background information about LGBTQ youth and discusses LGBTQ youth and the child welfare system, creating a welcoming home for youth, and supporting youth in the community.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Child welfare agencies, Community programs, Foster children, Foster parents, Homosexuality, Parent support services, Prevention, Schools, Social services, Youth, Youth development

American Academy of Pediatrics; Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption. 2013. Parenting after trauma: A guide for foster and adoptive parents. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 3 pp.

Boyd LW. 2013. Theraeputic foster care: Exceptional care for complex, trauma-impacted youth in foster care. Washington, DC: First Focus, State Policy and Advocacy Reform Center, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about best practices in therapeutic or treatment foster care (TFC), a clinical intervention for youth from birth to age 18 who have severe mental, emotional, or behavioral health needs. Topics include essential partners; building relationships among provider agencies and child advocates; example practices in Connecticut, Illinois, Michigan, Oklahoma, Nebraska; efforts to expand the focus beyond safety and permanency to well-being for youth in therapeutic foster care; and public policy challenges.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents with special health care needs, Advocacy, Behavioral medicine, Children with special health care needs, Foster care, Foster parents, Health services delivery, Intervention, Medically fragile children, Mental health, Policy development, Psychological needs, Reimbursement, Relationships, Therapeutics, Training, Trauma care, Youth

Langford BH, Greenblatt SB. [2012]. Investment matters: Investing in supports for pregnant and parenting adolescents and young adults in or transitioning from foster care. Chicago, IL: Youth Transition Funders Group, Foster Care Work Group, 7 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights considerations, challenges, and opportunities for foundations in investing in supports for pregnant and parenting adolescents and young adults—both mothers and fathers—currently in or transitioning from foster care. Topics include early sexual behavior, pregnancy, and rates of childbearing and parenthood among young people in foster care, risk factors, and challenging outcomes. Additional challenges such as lack of national data on specific needs and challenges, lack of practice models, need for workforce training, how to best identify and support adolescent fathers, and limited application of developmentally appropriate service delivery and planning with those that remain in foster care through age 21 are discussed. Investment opportunities in research and data collection, pregnancy prevention strategies, state supports for young parents and their children, and extending eligibility and re-entry are outlined.

Contact: Youth Transitions Funders Group, 207 East Ohio Street, #392, Chicago, IL 60611, E-mail: info@ytfg.org Web Site: http://www.ytfg.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Family support programs, Foster care, Parent support services, Transition to independent living, Young adults

Fordham Interdisciplinary Parent Representation Project. [2012]. Guide to working with young parents in out of home care. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information and guidance for working with pregnant and parenting youth, helping them as they develop both as individuals and as parents through positive casework interactions. The guide encourages a strengths-based approach to ensure the safety of both young parents and their children. It offers suggestions for engaging young parents in conferencing and supportive services while highlighting the importance of maintaining a young parent’s right to privacy and autonomy, and emphasize comprehensive planning for pregnant young people to promote well being, to minimize the need for court intervention, to ensure placement stability and to help young families move more quickly toward permanency. The guide is designed to be used primarily by provider agency case planners, but may also be useful to child protective staff, Family Services Unit staff, parent advocates, attorneys and others who work with this vulnerable population. Topics in planning and services for young parents in out of home care include: legal issues, father participation, collaborative planning and permanency, preventive services, child safety conferences, court intervention, pregnancy-related services, medical home visiting programs, parenting supports, counseling and mental health services, education, child care, and preparing a young parent for leaving foster care. Appendices provide resources for services in adolescent reproductive health, breastfeeding, the WIC program, support services and assistance, teen father support, mentoring and mental health, housing support, legal information, education, hoe visiting, and parenting education programs. Tips sheets are provided on mandatory reporting, early care and education, public housing, and transitional Medicaid.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

New York City Administration for Children's Services. 2012. ABCs of working with young parents in out of home care: Expectations, responsibilities and resources. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document is a source of information and guidance for case planners in New York City in their work with parenting youth and youth planning for the arrival of their baby in foster care, and in developing appropriate service plans for these youth. It discusses roles for agency case planners in referring both expecting mothers and fathers of health and support systems, discussing the role of resource parents for minors who are expecting, securing a stable placement for expecting youth before baby arrives, as well as developing and executing permanency plans for young parents in out-of-home care. Additional information is provided on health care testing and decision-making, legal aspects of pregnancy and parenting, and understanding funding for baby's essential needs. A practice guide summary is included along with resources for community based services, housing and child care, child welfare services, medical mentoring for pregnant and parenting youth, and prevention services.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

National Child Traumatic Stress Network. 2010. Caring for children who have experienced trauma: A workshop for resource parents. [Durham, NC]: National Child Traumatic Stress Network,

Annotation: This PowerPoint-based training curriculum, which is designed to be taught by a mental health professional along with foster parents as co-facilitators, includes nine case studies of representative foster children ages 8 months to 15 years, as well as of secondary traumatic stress in parents. The goal of the curriculum is to help parents understand the link between trauma and their children's often baffling behavior, feelings, and attitudes and to provide parents with tools to help children move forward, to recognize and reduce the impact of their children's traumas on themselves, and to seek useful support from others. It includes a facilitator's guide, a participant's guide, and a slide kit.

Contact: National Child Traumatic Stress Network, National Resource Center for Child Traumatic Stress, , 905 West Main Street, Suite 25B , Durham, NC 27701, Telephone: (919) 682-1552 Secondary Telephone: (310) 235-2633 Fax: (919) 667-9578 E-mail: nationalresourcecenter@duke.edu Web Site: http://www.nctsnet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Case studies, Child abuse, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child neglect, Curricula, Families, Family support, Foster children, Foster parents, Infant behavior, Mental health, Parent support services, Parenting skills, Training, Trauma

FosterClub. 2010. FosterClub transition toolkit. Seaside, OR: FosterClub; Washington, DC: Fostering Connections Resource Center, 34 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help youth in foster care and the adults supporting them develop a comprehensive plan for transitioning from life in foster care to independent adulthood. The toolkit is built around ten domains: finances and money management; job and career; life skills; identity; permanence; education; self care and health; housing; transportation; and community, culture, and social life. A map provides a quick overview of the ten domains, along with space to write down and keep track of the skills, knowledge, and resources needed to prepare for independent living. Advice on setting goals and step-by-step plans for achieving them are included.

Contact: FosterClub, 753 First Avenue, Seaside, OR 97138, Telephone: (503) 717-1552 Web Site: https://www.fosterclub.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Foster care, Foster children, Foster parents, Oral health, Parents, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Youth in transition programs

Family Violence Prevention Fund. [2009]. Connect: Supporting children exposed to domestic violence. [San Francisco, CA]: Family Violence Prevention Fund,

Annotation: This guide contains a three-hour curriculum, a PowerPoint presentation, and related tools intended for use in child welfare settings with foster parents, kin caregivers, and adoptive parents with all levels of experience in caring for children who have been exposed to domestic violence, or who may have cause to care for these children in the future. The resource is designed as a basic training session on the dynamics of domestic violence, the impact of exposure to domestic violence on children, and strategies for supporting children who have been exposed to violence. Online videos are provided along with mini-magazines for talking with children about violence against women. Some materials are available in Spanish.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Training materials, Audiovisual materials, Caregivers, Child mental health, Children, Curricula, Domestic violence, Foster parents, Spanish language materials

Regel CA. 2009. Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program: Follow the Child—Final report. Missoula, MO: Missoula City/County Health Department, 47 pp.

Annotation: This final report provides information about the Follow the Child project, which integrates foster children in Missoula County, Montana, into existing public health systems for preventive health care, including home visits, and and sets up consultations with foster parents and social workers. Contents include a description of the purpose of the project, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, results and outcomes, publications and products, dissemination and utilization of results, future plans and follow-up. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Child health, Final reports, Foster care, Foster children, Foster parents, Health care systems, Montana, Prevention, Service Integration

Dworsky A, DeCoursey J. 2009. Pregnant and parenting foster youth: Their needs, their experiences. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 43 pp.

Annotation: This monograph analyzes administrative data from an organization serving pregnant and parenting foster youth in the Chicago metropolitan area and surrounding counties. It quantitatively describes the characteristics of the pregnant and parenting foster youth problem in the Chicago area: placement histories, pregnancies and outcomes, receipt of prenatal care, education, and children of foster youth. Qualitative descriptions derived from interviews with organization leaders describe challenges in engaging youth with services, pregnancy prevention, services for pregnant foster youth, services for parenting foster youth and their children, placement-related concerns, education, and preparing foster youth for exiting care. Implications for policy and practice conclude the report.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Foster care, Foster children, Illinois, Pregnant adolescents, Statistics, Youth services

American Academy of Pediatrics, Task Force on Foster Care. 2009. Healthy Foster Care America. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This Web site is designed to engage communities and their leaders in supporting children, adolescents, and their families with an effective, multidisciplinary, integrated, and comprehensive continuum of care. The site includes (1) information on the health issues and needs of children and adolescents in foster care, (2) a downloadable chapter from a book on health in foster care, (3) search capabilities, (3) a link for subscribing to the Healthy Foster Care America listserv/online discussion group, (4) customizable forms, (5) slide presentations, (6) links to resources, and (7) a portal of resources for children and adolescents in foster care, parents (foster and birth), and kin.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Foster care, Foster children, Foster parents, Resource materials

Love LT, McIntosh J, Rosst M, Tertzakian K. 2005. Fostering hope: Preventing teen pregnancy among youth in foster care. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of qualitative research with adolescents in foster care and with foster parents to learn more about their perspective on adolescent pregnancy. The report is divided into the following chapters: (1) what the research shows, (2) focus groups, (3) service provider survey, (4) key questions, implications, and recomendations, and (5) appendix: roundtable participants.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org $1.00; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-058-3.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Focus groups, Foster care, Foster children, Foster parents, Research, Surveys

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2004. Moving youth from risk to opportunity: Kids Count essay. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 40 pp.

Annotation: This booklet focuses on disconnected youth—those in foster care, those involved in the juvenile justice system, those with children of their own, and those who never finished high school—and their transition to adulthood. The booklet discusses (1) each of these groups, (2) the importance of investing in these adolescents and young adults, and (3) crafting new connections for vulnerable adolescents and young adults. The booklet also offers conclusions. The booklet concludes with a list of endnotes.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Education, Foster care, High risk adolescents, High school, Juvenile justice, Transitions, Vulnerability, Young adults

Dicker S, Gordon E. 2004. Ensuring the healthy development of infants in foster care: A guide for judges, advocates, and child welfare professionals. Washington, DC: Zero to Three Policy Center, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report is designed to help judges, advocates, and child welfare professionals understand the questions to ask and the resources that can address the special needs of infants in foster care and strengthen their families. The report discusses building knowledge of infants in foster care and early childhood development; lists laws and guidelines to ensure healthy infant development; and presents information about the following questions to ask: (1) what are the medical needs of this infant?, (2) what are the developmental needs of this infant?, (3) what are the attachment and emotional needs of this infant?, (4) what challenges does this caregiver face that could impact his or her capacity to parent this infant?, and (5) what resources are available to enhance this infant's healthy development and prospects for permanency?

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Families, Foster care, Foster children, Foster parents, Infant development, Infants

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.