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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (34 total).

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. 2017. Feeding infants and young toddlers: Using the latest evidence in child-care settings. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 21 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes evidence for promoting healthy nutrition in the early care and education setting. Topics include breastfeeding, shaping food preferences among infants and toddlers, the role of the feeding environment and responsive feeding, introducing infants to complementary foods, and recognizing infants’ and toddlers’ hunger and fullness cues. Feeding strategies to reduce the likelihood that children will develop tooth decay are provided. Policy and practice implications are included.

Contact: Healthy Eating Research, Duke Global Health Institute, Duke University, Duke Box 90519, Durham, NC 27708, Telephone: (800) 578-8636 E-mail: globalhealth@duke.edu Web Site: http://www.healthyeatingresearch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child care, Complementary feeding, Early childhood education, Feeding, Food allergies, Food preferences, Food safety, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infants, Nutrition, Physical activity, Policy development, Toddlers, Young children

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2016. Winnable battles final report. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report describes public health priorities with large-scale impact on health, known effective strategies to address them, and progress towards meeting targeted goals. Contents include visual representations of progress and data trends, as well as summaries of federal contributions associated with each of the following topic areas: tobacco; nutrition, physical activity, and obesity; food safety; health care-associated infections; motor vehicle injuries; adolescent pregnancy; and HIV.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Food safety, Goals, HIV, Health, Infections, Motor vehicle safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Tobacco use, Treatments, Trends

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015. Dietary guidelines for Americans 2015–2020 (8th ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture,

Annotation: These guidelines, published every five years, are designed for professionals to help all individuals ages 2 and older and their families to consume a healthy, nutritionally adequate diet. The document discusses key elements of healthy eating patterns, shifts needed to align with healthy eating patterns, and roles of everyone in supporting healthy eating patterns.

Keywords: Behavior, Environmental factors, Food consumption, Food safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, Weight management

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Food safety: Resource brief (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Benjamin SE, ed. 2012. Making food healthy and safe for children: How to meet the Caring For Our Children national health and safety performance standards—Guidelines for out-of-home child care programs (2nd ed.). Chapel Hill, NC: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants, 72 pp.

Annotation: This revised manual is intended to help child care providers provide children with safe and healthy food and meet nutrition standards. The manual discusses the following topics: (1) keeping everything clean and safe, (2) using foods that are safe to eat, (3) storing foods safely, (4) planning to meet children's nutritional needs, (5) promoting pleasant meals and snacks, and (6) helping children and families learn about food. References are included. The manual includes three appendices: (1) Caring for Our Children standards, (2) community resources, and (3) resource list. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants, University of North Carolina, Department of Maternal and Child Health, 116-A South Merritt Mill Road, CB# 8126, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8126, Telephone: (919) 966-3780 Fax: (919) 843-4752 E-mail: nti@unc.edu Web Site: http://www.nti.unc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care centers, Family child care, Food safety, Health and safety, Nutrition, Out of home care, Standards

Bugden EA, Martinez AK, Greene BZ, Eig K. 2012. Safe at school and ready to learn: Comprehensive policy guide for protecting students with life-threatening food allergies. Alexandria, VA: National School Boards Association, 49 pp.

Annotation: This policy guide addresses the elements that the Food Safety and Modernization Act of 2010 requires be included in the federal voluntary guidelines that the act directs the Secretary of Health and Human Services to develop in partnership with the Secretary of Education. The guide focuses on the rationale for policy; the essential partnership of schools, families, and health professionals in supporting individual student needs; the need for planning and training to respond to food allergy-related emergencies; the value of communication and education for all parents, students, and school personnel; and the importance of a coordinated, systemic approach that reflects best practice for chronic life-threatening conditions. It includes a checklist for schools to assess the extent to which this guide’s components are included in food allergy policy and implemented in practice, as well as examples of state and local education policies.

Contact: National School Boards Association, 1680 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 838-6722 Fax: (703) 683-7590 E-mail: info@nsba.org Web Site: http://www.nsba.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-88364-314-3.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Communication, Education, Emergencies, Families, Food allergies, Health policy, Legislation, Policy development, Program coordination, Public policy, Safety, School age children, School health, Training

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 2012. Food safety for moms-to-be. Rockville, MD: U.S. Food and Drug Administration,

Annotation: This website provides information on food safety and preventing foodborne illness for pregnant women. Advice is provided for women before they get pregnant, during pregnancy, in addition to over a whole life cycle. More contents include a food-by-food guide, revised food handling guidelines, educator tools, resources for professionals, and brochures.

Contact: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993, Telephone: (888) 463-6332 Fax: (301) 443-3100 Web Site: http://www.fda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Food safety, Maternal nutrition, Preconceptional nutrition, Pregnant women, Resources for professionals

Ohio State University Extension and Colorado State University Extension. 2011. Healthy baby, healthy me: A curriculum on safe food handling for pregnant women. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Extension,

Annotation: This curriculum on safe food handling for pregnant women includes four lesson plans, handouts, a teachers0' guide, evaluation forms, and slides that can be projected or used as flip charts. Lesson one explains why pregnant women are at increased risk for foodborne illness; lesson two provides information about Toxoplasma gondii and how to prevent infection by this parasite; lesson three is about the foods that can be contaminated with Salmonella; and lesson four talks about using thermometers to take the temperatures of cooked foods to prevent Camplyobacter. Also included are marketing materials to promote the course and a certificate of completion.

Contact: Ohio State University Extension, 2120 Fyffe Rd., Room 3 Ag Admin, Columbus, OH 43210, Telephone: 614-292-6181 Fax: 618-688-3807 Web Site: http://extension.osu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Educational materials, Food handling, Pregnant women, Safety

Ohio State University Extension and Colorado State University Extension. 2011. Healthy baby, healthy me: A curriculum on safe food handling for pregnant women. Columbus, OH: Ohio State University Extension,

Annotation: This curriculum on safe food handling for pregnant women includes four lesson plans, handouts, a teachers guide, evaluation forms, and slides that can be projected or used as flip charts. Lesson one explains why pregnant women are at increased risk for foodborne illness; lesson two provides information about Toxoplasma gondii and how to prevent infection by this parasite; lesson three is about the foods that can be contaminated with salmonella; and lesson four talks about using thermometers to take the temperatures of cooked foods to prevent Camplyobacter. Also included are marketing materials to promote the course and a certificate of completion for the course.

Contact: Ohio State University Extension, 2120 Fyffe Rd., Room 3 Ag Admin, Columbus, OH 43210, Telephone: 614-292-6181 Fax: 618-688-3807 Web Site: http://extension.osu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Curricula, Food handling, Food safety, Pregnant women, Prenatal care

Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. 2010. Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the dietary guidelines for Americans. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion,

Annotation: This report provides evidence-based guidelines and recommendations for halting and reversing the obesity problem in the United States through primary prevention and changes in behavior, the environment, and the food supply. The report discusses setting the stage and integrating the evidence (the total diet and translating and integrating the evidence), presents the methodology, and reviews the science base (energy balance and weight management; nutrient adequacy; fatty acids and cholesterol; protein; carbohydrates; sodium, potassium, and water; alcohol; and food safety and technology). The Web site for the report also includes links to supplementary information related to the report.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior, Environmental factors, Food consumption, Food safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, Weight management

Rosen Publishing Online. 2009. Teen health and wellness: Real life, real answers . New York, NY: Rosen Publishing Online,

Annotation: This Web site provides students with curricular support and self-help on topics including diseases, drugs, alcohol, nutrition, fitness, mental health, diversity, family life, and more. Users can subscribe for a fee or use a 3-day free trial. Sample articles on anorexia nervosa, asthma, and decision making are available.

Contact: Rosen Publishing Group, 29 East 21st Street, New York, NY 10010, Telephone: (800) 237-9932 Fax: (888) 436-4643 Web Site: http://www.rosenpublishing.com/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Adolescent sexuality, Alcohol consumption, Drug use, Eating disorders, Families, Food, Grief, Mental health, Nutrition, Relationships, Safety, World Wide Web

California Pan-Ethnic Health Network. 2009. The landscape of opportunity: Cultivating health equity in California. Oakland, CA: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 40 pp.

Annotation: This brief includes information on socioeconomic and environmental and social factors such as education, housing, neighborhood safety, food access, criminal justice, and health insurance, among others, to show how they are connected and how they impact health and what are the key factors to focus on in the quest to eliminate health inequities in communities of color in California. The brief also presents a framework for health equity and discusses policy recommendations.

Contact: California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, 1221 Preservation Park Way, Suite 200, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 832-1160 Fax: (510) 832-1175 E-mail: info@cpehn.org Web Site: http://www.cpehn.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Criminal justice system, Education, Ethnic factors, Food, Health, Health insurance, Housing, Income factors, Low income groups, Mental health, Minority groups, Neighborhoods, Nutrition, Physical activity, Poverty, Public policy, Racial factors, Safety, State surveys

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals and Physicians for Social Responsibility. 2008. Fish consumption to promote good health and minimize contaminants: A quick reference guide for clinicians [upd. ed.]. Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 17 pp.

Annotation: This reference guide for health professionals reviews the scientific evidence on fish contaminants and provides guidelines on fish consumption based on the available evidence. Topics include mercury levels in commercial fish and shellfish and PCBs in freshwater and coastal fish, state and regional fish consumption advisories, the omega 3 content of fish and seafood, and a summary of fish consumption guidelines for women of childbearing age (including adolescent girls) and for children under age 12. A list of web-based resources and references are included. A brochure titled Healthy Fish, Healthy Families, which was adapted from the guide is also available in English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese.

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Cardiovascular diseases, Child development, Child health, Environmental pollution, Food consumption, Food safety, Infant development, Infant health, Pregnancy, Women's health

New York State Department of Health, New York State Department of Education, and New York Statewide School Health Services Center. [2007]. Making the difference: Caring for students with life-threatening allergies. [Albany, NY]: New York State Department of Health, 55 pp.

Annotation: This document contains procedures and guidelines to assist school districts in the development and implementation of policies to care for students with life-threatening allergies. The document is intended for use by boards of education, superintendents, building teams, and parents or guardians in providing a safe environment and reasonable care. Topics include allergy and anaphylaxis overview, the importance of prevention, health history and planning, care plan considerations, guidelines for the school team, classroom and school environmental concerns, cafeteria accommodations, field trip issues, steps to take in the event of a reaction, policy and protocol development, and laws and regulations. Sample policies, forms, and letters are also included.

Contact: New York State Department of Health, Corning Tower, Empire State Plaza, Albany, NY 12237, Telephone: (866) 881-2809 E-mail: dohweb@health.state.ny.us Web Site: http://www.health.ny.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Allergies, Child health, Food allergies, Guidelines, Prevention, Regulations, Safety, Schools, Students

Alabama Department of Public Health. [2006]. In case of emergency, are you ready?. Montgomery, AL: Alabama Department of Public Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information that can help families create an emergency preparedness plan that will enable them to respond more quickly and efficiently during an emergency. Topics include evacuation and sheltering, special populations, important documents, supply kits, checklists, disease prevention and control, pandemic influenza, natural disasters, hazardous materials, injury prevention, food and water safety, coping with disasters, emergency preparedness teams, additional resources, and personal emergency phone contacts.

Contact: Alabama Department of Public Health, RSA Tower, 201 Monroe Street, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 206-5300 Secondary Telephone: (800) ALA-1818 Fax: Web Site: http://www.adph.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Consumer education materials, Disasters, Disease prevention, Emergencies, Families, Food safety, Hazardous materials, Influenza, Water safety

Pfizer. 2006. Milestones in public health: Accomplishments in public health over the last 100 years. New York, NY: Pfizer, 275 pp.

Annotation: This book provides an overview of milestones in public health during the last century in the United States. The milestones discussed are those identified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They are advances in (1) addiction, (2) automotive safety, (3) cancer, (4) cardiovascular disease, (5) environmental and occupational health, (6) food safety, (7) infectious disease control, (8) maternal and child health, (9) oral health, and (10) vaccines. One chapter in the book is devoted to each milestone. Each chapter is written by a different expert, and each explores historical developments related to the milestone and presents a case study of the milestone and a vignette illustrating another facet of the milestone. Predictions of advances still to come are offered, as well. The book includes a prologue, an epilogue, and references. Also available as a course.

Contact: Pfizer, 235 East 42nd Street, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 733-2323 Web Site: http://www.pfizer.com/home Available from the website.

Keywords: Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Child health, Children, Communicable disease control, Distance education, Drug addiction, Environmental health, Food safety, History, History, Infants, Motor vehicle safety, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Parents, Public health, Vaccines, Women's health

Food and Nutrition Board, Committee on the Evaluation of the Addition of Ingredients New to Infant Formula. 2004. Infant formula: Evaluating the safety of new ingredients. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 206 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the regulatory and research issues that are critical in assessing the safety of the addition of new ingredients to infant formulas. It begins with an overview of infant formula regulations and guidelines and the rationale for the report. Chapter 2 reviews the parameters considered by the committee when defining "safety" and how to approach it from a practical, theoretical, and statistical point of view. Chapter 3 compares how biological and behavioral advantages of human milk with infant formulas and reviews how infant formulas were developed to meet the biological advantages of human milk. The remainder of the report reviews the current regulatory processes involved in evaluating infant formulas and provides recommendations for the overall process, preclinical studies, clinical studies, and in-market surveillance. The appendices include acronyms and a glossary, composition of infant formulas and human milk for feeding tern infants in the United States, the Redbook table of contents, applying the recommended approaches, and biographical sketches of committee members. References are provided at the end of each chapter.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09150-0.

Keywords: Child development, Food safety, Infant formula, Infant nutrition, Milk, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition research

U.S. General Accounting Office. 2003. Pediatric drug research: Food and Drug Administration should more efficiently monitor inclusion of minority children. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) concern that drug effectiveness and adverse affects can vary among children from different racial and ethnic groups. The report focusing on the following questions: (1) to what extent are children of racial and ethnic minority groups represented in clinical studies for drugs granted exclusive marketing rights, (2) are drugs that are used to treat diseases that disproportionately affect racial and ethnic minority groups being studied for safety and effectiveness in children under the pediatric exclusivity provision, and (3) does the Food and Drug Administration have appropriate management systems to monitor the representation of children of racial and ethnic groups in studies submitted for additional exclusive marketing rights? Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes four appendices that discuss the study's scope and provide additional supplemental information.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-03-950.

Keywords: Child safety, Children, Drug effects, Food and Drug Administration, Minority groups, Minority health, Racial factors

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 1999. Ten great public health achievements in the 20th century. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 11 items.

Annotation: This resource features a series of reports published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Reports between April and December 1999 on 10 public health achievements, reflecting the successful response of public health to the major causes of morbidity and mortality for the period 1900-1999. Topics include vaccination, motor-vehicle safety, workplace safety, control of infectious diseases, decline in deaths from coronary heart disease and stroke, safer and healthier foods, healthier mothers and babies, family planning, fluoridation of drinking water, and tobacco as a health hazard. Critical changes in the U.S. public health system during the century are also addressed.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Cardiovascular diseases, Children, Families, Family planning, Fluorides, Food safety, Health policy, History, Infant health, Infection control, Maternal health, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicle safety, Occupational safety and health, Oral health, Public health, Strokes, Systems development, Tobacco use, Vaccination effects, Water

University of Massachusetts Extension. [1998]. Food handling is risky business. (Rev. ed.). [Amherst], MA: University of Massachusetts Extension, 48 pp.

Annotation: This trainer's manual explains the basics of safe food handling for those working in a variety of group settings. These include center-based child care, family child care, shelters, resident homes, congregate meal sites, school food services, and soup kitchens. The lesson materials include a trainer lesson plan, attendance sheet, trainer pretest and post test, and survey pretest and post test. The responsibilities of a trainer of food-safety education volunteers and a checklist for trainers are also included. The final section contains resource materials for use by trainers in teaching food handling. Some resource items are also provided in Spanish.

Contact: University of Massachusetts Extension, 101 University Drive, Ste. C1, Amherst, MA 01002, Telephone: 413-545-4800 Fax: (413) 545-6555 E-mail: ritabo@nutrition.umass.edu Web Site: http://www.umassextension.org/ $20.00.

Keywords: Food handling, Food preparation, Food safety, Spanish language materials

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.