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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (51 total).

Clark D. n.d.. Dietary score: Assessment tools and instructions. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health , 20 pp.

Annotation: This manual is a dietary assessment tool used by licensed dietitians for WIC applicants and participants. The tool is divided into four sections, which are: 1) dietary questions, 2) food frequency, 3) nutrition risk assessment, and 4) space for a nutrition care plan. Each section has blank forms and instructions and suggestions.

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 Contact Phone: (515) 281-5787 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Price unknown.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietitians, Food habits, Forms, Nutrition assessment, Nutrition education, Nutrition monitoring, Nutrition research, WIC Program

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. 2017. SuperTracker: My foods. My fitness. My health.. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool incorporates the President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition's Presidential Champions program and uses gamification, the application of points and achievements to non-game context, to inspire youth and adults to engage in physical activity and to monitor progress toward their own health goals. Users can determine what and how much to eat; track their food intake, physical activity, and weight; and personalize their experience by setting individual goals, journaling, and receiving virtual coaching.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietary guidelines, Electronic journals, Food consumption, Food habits, Food preferences, Games, Goals, Health promotion, Life course, Motivation, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation framework: Nutrition, physical activity, and obesity prevention indicators–Interpretive guide to the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 320 pp.

Annotation: This guide for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) administrators, evaluators, and others identifies and explains the indicators, outcome measures, and preferred methodologies for tracking success; developing state- and local-level objectives; and reporting program results. Contents include outcome indicators relevant to individuals, environmental settings, sectors of influence, population results, and social norms and values.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. SNAP-Ed strategies & interventions: An obesity prevention toolkit for states–Featuring evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental changes that support direct education and social marketing and ways to evaluate them across various settings. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 52 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help states improve the likelihood that individuals with low incomes will make healthy food choices within a limited budget and choose physically active lifestyles consistent with current guidelines by providing nutrition education and obesity prevention services, using interventions that include direct education; social marketing; and policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) changes. Contents include evidence-based obesity prevention programs and PSE strategies and interventions that states can use in their plans to comply with the requirement that plans include multi-level interventions or public health approaches. The toolkit includes a section on evaluation of interventions that may be considered along with evaluation recommendations and requirements.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Centers of Excellence, Southern Region at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2016. SNAP-Ed toolkit: Obesity prevention interventions and evaluation framework. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource is designed to help Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) implementing agencies find evidence-based obesity prevention and policy, systems, and environmental change (PSE) interventions and learn about outcome indicators from the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. A glossary of terms from the framework is also included. An online resource center for state and local SNAP-Ed providers and a library for locating SNAP-Ed tools and resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Training, Weight management

Vericker TC. 2015. Maternal depression associated with less healthy dietary behaviors in young children . Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 11 pp.

Annotation: This research brief investigates the relationship between maternal depression and eating habits earlier in childhood, when food preferences are developing. Topics include the prevalence and severity of maternal depression; characteristics of mothers, households, and kindergarten-age children; and associations between mothers' depressive symptoms and their kindergarten-age children's eating practices. Contents include data, measures, analyses, and discussion and conclusions.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Food consumption, Food habits, Maternal mental health, Nutrition, Young children

California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program. 2015. California nutrition and physical activity guidelines for adolescents. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, 1 v.

Annotation: These guidelines are designed to assist case managers in improving the nutrition, physical activity, and healthy eating practices of adolescent clients. Topics include adolescent nutrition, infant feeding, nutrition and physical activity screen, calcium, iron, folate and folic acid, fruits and vegetables, body image and disordered eating, weight management, physical activity, and vegetarianism. Contents include handouts for motivational counseling and education with adolescents.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, California, Case management, Counseling, Dietary guidelines, Food consumption, Food habits, Health education, Motivation, Nutrition, Physical activity, Screening

Perez-Escamilla R, Meyers J. 2014. Preventing childhood obesity: Maternal-child life course approach. Farmington, CT: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 31 pp. (IMPACT)

Annotation: This report reviews evidence supporting implementing child obesity prevention strategies based on the maternal-child life course approach. Topics include cumulative caloric imbalance and childhood obesity, periconceptional nutrition, weight gain during pregnancy, maternal smoking during pregnancy, breastfeeding, complementary feeding, development of food taste preferences in the infancy period, weight gain during the first year of life, and toddler and preschool nutrition. Contents include a summary of the science and implications for policy and practice, initiatives in Connecticut to reduce child obesity risk factors among children under age 3, and recommendations for action.

Contact: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 367, Farmington, CT 06032, Telephone: (860) 679-1519 Fax: (860) 679-1521 E-mail: info@chdi.org Web Site: http://www.chdi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Connecticut, Food habits, Gestational weight gain, Infant feeding, Infants, Life course, Model programs, Obesity, Policy development, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Risk factors, State initiatives, Weight, Young children

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2013. My bright future: Physical activity and healthy eating—For adolescent girls and young women (upd.). [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 15 pp. (Bright futures for women's health and wellness)

Annotation: This booklet is designed to help adolescent girls and young women learn more about the importance of physical activity and healthy eating in their daily lives. It also offers advice to help girls and young women identify areas for improvement and set and reach their health goals. The booklet provides ideas on how to start a conversation with health professionals and examples of questions to ask, a section for the health professional to fill out during a visit, a goal-setting chart for girls and young women to use with their health professional or on their own, information on why physical activity and nutrition are important for girls and young women, and tips to help them reach their goals. A wallet card is also available.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Consumer education materials, Food habits, Goals, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight management, Women's health, Young adults

Bell J, Mora G, Hagan E, Rubin V, Karpyn A. 2013. Access to healthy foods and why it matters: A review of the research . Oakland, CA: PolicyLink; Philadelphia, PA: The Food Trust, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a current picture of the state of the research on food access, examining the relationship between the “food environments” in which people live and their diets, as well as the relationship between food retailing and community economic development. Topics include measuring change over time in terms of better access to healthy food, the role poor access to healthy food contributes to poorer nutrition overall, and how new healthy food retailing contributes to community economic development in tangible, positive ways.

Contact: PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: info@policylink.org Web Site: http://www.policylink.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Research, Community surveys, Food, Food habits, Food supply, Low income groups, Nutrition, Public health nutrition, Racial factors, Rural environment, Socioeconomic factors

Weight-control Information Network. 2012. Helping your child: Tips for parents. [Upd. ed.]. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 22 pp. (Healthy eating and physical activity across your lifespan)

Annotation: This booklet for parents offers information about how to help families learn healthy habits, healthy eating and physical activity. Topics discussed include how healthy eating and physical activity help children, how children's eating and activity habits are formed, what children should eat, how to help children eat better, how to help children be more active, and how to help overweight children. Information on serving sizes, sources of calcium, and snack ideas is also provided. Resources and suggestions for additional reading are included, as well. The booklet concludes with a tear-off checklist for encouraging healthy eating and physical activity.

Contact: Weight-Control Information Network, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, One Win Way, Bethesda, MD 20892-3665, Telephone: (877) 946-4627 Fax: (202) 828-1028 E-mail: WIN@info.niddk.nih.gov Web Site: http://win.niddk.nih.gov/index.htm Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub no. 04-4955.

Keywords: Body weight, Child health, Child nutrition, Consumer education materials, Food habits, Obesity, Physical activity, Snacks

Edelstein S. 2011. Food, cuisine, and cultural competency for culinary, hospitality, and nutrition professionals. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Barlett, 610 pp.

Annotation: This book covers the unique food traditions of over 50 different cultures as they apply to health. The text explores the importance of cultural sensitivity and competency in today's work setting, addresses health literacy issues, and helps readers identify customer communication techniques that enable professionals to establish trust with clients of different ethnic origins. The first section provides an overview of food traditions and practices within various religions, while the remaining sections focus on distinct regions around the world. Individual chapters cover specific countries, focusing on the various contexts that contribute to nutrition and health: lifestyles, eating patterns, ethnic foods, menu planning, communication (verbal and non-verbal), and more. This book is consistent with The American Dietetic Association s Cultural Competence Strategic Plan.

Keywords: Cultural sensitivity, Ethnic groups, Food habits, International health, Minority groups, Nutrition, Nutrition education

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2010. Dietary guidelines for Americans. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture, 95 pp., exec. summ. (6 pp.).

Annotation: These guidelines, published every 5 years since 1980, provide authoritative advice for people ages 2 and older about how dietary habits can promote health and reduce risk for major chronic diseases. The guidelines serve as the basis for federal food and nutrition education programs. The 7th edition includes recommendations for the general population and for specific population groups, such as women who are pregnant. A table with key consumer behaviors and potential strategies for professionals to use in implementing the guidelines is included in the appendix. Selected messages for consumers are also available.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Single copies available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary guidelines, Disease prevention, Federal programs, Food habits, Health promotion, Public health nutrition, Risk factors

Cohen L, Davis R, Lee V, Valdovinos E. 2010. Addressing the intersection: Preventing violence and promoting healthy eating and active living. Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute, 33 pp., exec. summ. (6 pp.).

Annotation: This paper presents findings on the relationship between violence and healthy environments and emerging strategies for preventing violence and promoting healthy eating and active living. Section 1 provides background to help health leaders assess what it takes to reduce violence including individual, family, and community risk and resilience factors. Section 2 addresses environmental and policy change strategies. Section 3 explores ways that healthy eating and active living practitioners can elevate their role in fostering safer communities through advocacy and partnerships.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Food habits, Health behavior, Health promotion, Nutrition attitudes, Physical activity, Public health, Public policy, Resilience, Risk taking, Violence prevention

Weight-control Information Network. 2009. Fit for two: Tips for pregnancy. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 25 pp. (Healthy eating and physical activity across your lifespan)

Annotation: This Web site, which is geared toward pregnant women, offers information about how to have a healthier pregnancy by eating healthy foods and engaging in physical activity. The information is divided into three main sections: healthy eating, physical activity, and after the baby is born. Each section includes answers to common questions. A list of resources is included, as well.

Contact: Weight-Control Information Network, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, One Win Way, Bethesda, MD 20892-3665, Telephone: (877) 946-4627 Fax: (202) 828-1028 E-mail: WIN@info.niddk.nih.gov Web Site: http://win.niddk.nih.gov/index.htm Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub no. 06-5130.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Food habits, Physical activity, Pregnancy, Prenatal education, Women's health

Babey SH, Jones M, Yu H, Goldstein H. 2009. Bubbling over: Soda consumption and its link to obesity in California. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 8 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on a study on geographic variations in consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages among California children, adolescents, and adults and examines the correlation between soda consumption and obesity. The brief provides background and discusses soda consumption in California, the association between soda consumption and a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity, and varying soda consumption from place to place in California.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adult health, Beverages, California, Child health, Food consumption, Food habits, Geographic factors, Nutrition, Obesity, State surveys

Lee V, Mikkelsen L, Srikantharajah J, Cohen L. 2008. Strategies for enhancing the built environment to support healthy eating and active living. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink, Healthy Eating Active Living Convergence Partnership, 24 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines a range of organizational practices and public policies being considered to improve the built environment in support of healthy eating and regular physical activity. The brief begins with a description of key characteristics of the built environment and how they affect eating and activity behaviors. It then outlines three target areas -- active transportation and public transit, activity-friendly recreation environments, and land use planning -- and provides a general overview of the breadth of strategies and federal policies to effect the change. The brief also highlights political opportunities, primarily at state and federal levels, that promote increased levels of physical activity and healthy eating in communities.

Contact: Convergence Partnership, PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: http://www.kintera.org/site/lookup.asp?c=fhLOK6PELmF&b=3930101 Web Site: http://www.convergencepartnership.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Communities, Food habits, Low income groups, Nutrition, Physical activity, Public policy, Urban environment

Gantz W, Schwartz N, Angelini JR, Rideout V. 2007. Food for thought: Television food advertising to children in the United States. Washington, DC: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report paints a picture of the current landscape of food advertising on television to children, to help inform the efforts of policymakers and the food and media industries, and to provide a benchmark for measuring change in the years ahead. Chapter topics include an overview of non-programming content on television, food advertising on television, and the amount of food advertising seen by children. Information is provided on the study methodology, statistical data are included in tables, and references conclude the report.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, Washington, DC Office/Public Affairs Center, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.kff.org/about/bjcc/bjcc_floor.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Advertising, Children, Food habits, Media campaigns, Television

McGinnis JM, Gootman JA, Kraak VI, eds.; Committee on Food Marketing and the Diets of Children and Youth. 2006. Food marketing to children and youth: Threat or opportunity?. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 516 pp.

Annotation: This book reviews scientific studies designed to assess the influence of marketing on the nutritional beliefs, choices, practices, and outcomes for children and youth. Chapter topics include health, diet, and eating patterns; food and beverage marketing; the influence of marketing on the diets and diet-related health of children and youth; and public policy issues in food and beverage marketing. Findings, recommendations, and next steps are summarized at the conclusion. References are provided at the end of each chapter. Appendices include a list of acronyms, a glossary, a literature review, statistical tables and more references, as well as an agenda of a workshop program held January 27, 2005 and biographical sketches of committee members and staff.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-09713-4.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent nutrition, Child health, Child nutrition, Diet, Food consumption, Food habits, Literature reviews, Market research

Center for Science in the Public Interest. 2005. Guidelines for responsible food marketing to children. Washington, DC: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 6 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines are intended for those who manufacture, sell, market, advertise, or otherwise promote food to children. The guidelines provide criteria for marketing food to children in a manner that does not undermine their diets or harm their health. The guidelines discuss obesity and unhealthy eating habits among children, supporting parents' efforts to foster healthy eating habits in children, protecting children from marketing of foods that can harm their health, nutrition guidelines, and marketing techniques.

Contact: Center for Science in the Public Interest, 1220 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 332-9110 Fax: (202) 265-4954 E-mail: cspi@cspinet.org Web Site: http://www.cspinet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Food habits, Guidelines, Marketing, Nutrition, Nutrition policy, Obesity

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.