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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (62 total).

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. 2017. SuperTracker: My foods. My fitness. My health.. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool incorporates the President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition's Presidential Champions program and uses gamification, the application of points and achievements to non-game context, to inspire youth and adults to engage in physical activity and to monitor progress toward their own health goals. Users can determine what and how much to eat; track their food intake, physical activity, and weight; and personalize their experience by setting individual goals, journaling, and receiving virtual coaching.

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Dietary assessment, Dietary guidelines, Electronic journals, Food consumption, Food habits, Food preferences, Games, Goals, Health promotion, Life course, Motivation, Nutrition, Physical activity, Weight

Harris JL, Haraghey KS, Choi Y-Y, Fleming-Milici F. 2017. Parents' attitudes about food marketing to children: 2012 to 2015–Opportunities and challenges to creating demand for a healthier food environment. Hartford, CT: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report presents results of a survey of parents with children and adolescents ages 2 to 17 to measure parents' attitudes about food marketing and other influences on children's eating habits and their support for policies to promote healthy eating for their children. Topics include parents' opinions about food industry self-regulation, including the ages of children who should be protected from unhealthy food marketing and whether they believe that individual food companies have delivered on their pledges to limit food advertising to children. The report also examines parents' willingness to participate in a variety of actions to encourage companies to reduce unhealthy food marketing to their children. A series of infographics is also available.

Contact: Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity, University of Connecticut, One Constitution Plaza, Suite 600, Hartford, CT 06511, Telephone: (860) 380-1000 Fax: (860) 509-0009 E-mail: rudd.center@uconn.edu Web Site: http://www.uconnruddcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Advocacy, Beliefs, Children, Consumer satisfaction, Consumer surveys, Food consumption, Marketing, Nutrition, Parent participation, Parenting attitudes, Policy development

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation framework: Nutrition, physical activity, and obesity prevention indicators–Interpretive guide to the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 320 pp.

Annotation: This guide for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) administrators, evaluators, and others identifies and explains the indicators, outcome measures, and preferred methodologies for tracking success; developing state- and local-level objectives; and reporting program results. Contents include outcome indicators relevant to individuals, environmental settings, sectors of influence, population results, and social norms and values.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. SNAP-Ed strategies & interventions: An obesity prevention toolkit for states–Featuring evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental changes that support direct education and social marketing and ways to evaluate them across various settings. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 52 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help states improve the likelihood that individuals with low incomes will make healthy food choices within a limited budget and choose physically active lifestyles consistent with current guidelines by providing nutrition education and obesity prevention services, using interventions that include direct education; social marketing; and policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) changes. Contents include evidence-based obesity prevention programs and PSE strategies and interventions that states can use in their plans to comply with the requirement that plans include multi-level interventions or public health approaches. The toolkit includes a section on evaluation of interventions that may be considered along with evaluation recommendations and requirements.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Centers of Excellence, Southern Region at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2016. SNAP-Ed toolkit: Obesity prevention interventions and evaluation framework. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource is designed to help Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) implementing agencies find evidence-based obesity prevention and policy, systems, and environmental change (PSE) interventions and learn about outcome indicators from the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. A glossary of terms from the framework is also included. An online resource center for state and local SNAP-Ed providers and a library for locating SNAP-Ed tools and resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Training, Weight management

First 5 Contra Costa Children and Families Commission, Healthy+Active Before 5. 2015–. Sugar Bites. Concord, CA: First 5 Contra Costa Children and Families Commission, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources are part of a public-awareness campaign aimed at preventing the development of chronic diseases by encouraging parents to choose water for their young child instead of drinks that are high in sugar. The resources focus on reducing children’s risk for obesity, tooth decay, and type 2 diabetes by reducing their consumption of flavored milk, juice drinks, soda, and sports drinks. Contents include brochures, posters, videos, and web graphics. The resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: First 5 Contra Costa Children and Families Commission, 1485 Civic Court, Suite 1200, Concord, CA 94520, Telephone: (925) 771-7300 Web Site: http://www.first5coco.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Consumer education materials, Dental caries, Disease prevention, Fluid intake, Food consumption, Local initiatives, Multimedia, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Public awareness campaigns, Resource materials, Risk factors, Spanish language materials, Sugar, Water, Young children

Fletcher A. 2015. Changing lives, saving lives: A step-by-step guide to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity and food security in afterschool programs (2nd ed.). Sacramento, CA: Center for Collaborative Solutions, Healthy Behaviors Initiative, 158 pp.

Annotation: This guide for after school program directors, members of leadership teams, site directors, and partners provides a step-by-step approach to developing exemplary practices in healthy eating, physical activity, and food security. The guide examines each practice in terms of what it means; why it matters; and how it can be embedded into, expanded upon, and deepen current work. Examples from learning centers, including their successes and the challenges they had to overcome, are provided throughout. The guide also includes progress indicators for assessing where a program and or site is at any given point in time as they move from starting out in this process to reaching exemplary levels.

Contact: Center for Collaborative Solutions, 1337 Howe Avenue, Suite 210, Sacramento, CA 95825, Telephone: (916) 567-9911 Fax: (916) 567-0776 E-mail: ccs@ccscenter.org Web Site: http://ccscenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, After school programs, Child health, Communities, Families, Financing, Food consumption, Hunger, Learning, Low income groups, Manuals, Model programs, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Program development, Schools

Vericker TC. 2015. Maternal depression associated with less healthy dietary behaviors in young children . Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 11 pp.

Annotation: This research brief investigates the relationship between maternal depression and eating habits earlier in childhood, when food preferences are developing. Topics include the prevalence and severity of maternal depression; characteristics of mothers, households, and kindergarten-age children; and associations between mothers' depressive symptoms and their kindergarten-age children's eating practices. Contents include data, measures, analyses, and discussion and conclusions.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Food consumption, Food habits, Maternal mental health, Nutrition, Young children

Leadership for Healthy Communities. 2015. Sugary drinks in communities of color: Recent research and policy options to reduce consumption. Washington, DC: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 20 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief investigates sugary drink consumption in communities of color, focusing on the public health impact and marketing of such products, and policy options to facilitate healthy beverage consumption. It also discusses how decision makers can work to prevent childhood obesity and related illnesses by advancing policies to reduce the marketing and appeal of sugary drinks—and increase the availability of healthy alternatives—in communities of color.

Contact: Leadership for Healthy Communities, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 975***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 265-5112 E-mail: info@leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Web Site: http://www.leadershipforhealthycommunities.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Food consumption, Marketing, Minority groups, Minority health, Nutrition, Obesity, Policy development, Sugar

California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program. 2015. California nutrition and physical activity guidelines for adolescents. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health, 1 v.

Annotation: These guidelines are designed to assist case managers in improving the nutrition, physical activity, and healthy eating practices of adolescent clients. Topics include adolescent nutrition, infant feeding, nutrition and physical activity screen, calcium, iron, folate and folic acid, fruits and vegetables, body image and disordered eating, weight management, physical activity, and vegetarianism. Contents include handouts for motivational counseling and education with adolescents.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, California, Case management, Counseling, Dietary guidelines, Food consumption, Food habits, Health education, Motivation, Nutrition, Physical activity, Screening

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture. 2015. Dietary guidelines for Americans 2015–2020 (8th ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture,

Annotation: These guidelines, published every five years, are designed for professionals to help all individuals ages 2 and older and their families to consume a healthy, nutritionally adequate diet. The document discusses key elements of healthy eating patterns, shifts needed to align with healthy eating patterns, and roles of everyone in supporting healthy eating patterns.

Keywords: Behavior, Environmental factors, Food consumption, Food safety, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Research, Weight management

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. 2015. Comprehensive framework for addressing the school nutrition environment and services. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document describes components of the school nutrition environment and resources to support a healthy school nutrition environment. Topics include school meals, smart snacks in school; in-school fundraisers; classroom celebrations, events, and nonfood rewards; access to drinking water; staff role modeling; food and beverage marketing; and healthy eating learning opportunities.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp Available from the website.

Keywords: Fluid intake, Food consumption, Health policy, Health promotion, Learning, Marketing, Models, Nutrition, Policy development, Role models, School health services, Schools, Snacks, Water

Goldman N, Sheward R, Ettinger de Cuba S, Black MM, Sandel M, Cook J, Coleman S. 2014. The hunger vital sign: A new standard of care for preventive health. Boston, MA: Children's HealthWatch, 4 pp. (Policy action brief)

Al-Dajani M, Limeback H. 2014. Nutritional strategies for caries reduction. Dimensions of Dental Hygiene 12(8):30–33,

Annotation: This course for oral health professionals focuses on the role of food-consumption choices in preventing tooth decay and promoting oral health. Topics include how the consumption of fermentable carbohydrates affects dental biofilm, how changes in eating habits affect risk of dental caries, and food choices that can inhibit caries incidence.

Contact: Belmont Publications, CE Department, 3621 Harbor Boulevard, Suite 265, Santa Ana, CA 92704, Telephone: (714) 825-0988 Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Continuing education, Dental caries, Dental hygienists, Dentists, Disease management, Disease prevention, Distance education, Food consumption, Health services, Nutrition, Oral health, Risk factors, Training

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Healthy Eating Research. 2013. Recommendations for healthier beverages. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and the corresponding risk of poor diet quality, obesity, diet-related health problems, and poor oral health. The paper provides detailed lists of recommended beverages for the following ages ranges: ages 2–4, 5–10, 11–13, 14–18, and 19 and above. A rationale for the recommendations is provided, along with a discussion of key findings of a panel of experts.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adults, Child health, Diet, Food consumption, Health, Nutrition, Obesity, Oral health, Risk factors, Sugar

Kirkendall N, House C, Citro C, Committee on National Statistics, Food and Nutrition Board. 2013. Research opportunities concerning the causes and consequences of child food insecurity and hunger: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 194 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the adequacy of current knowledge, identifies substantial research gaps, and considers data availability of economic, health, social, cultural, demographic, and other factors that contribute to childhood hunger or food insecurity. It also considers the geographic distribution of childhood hunger and food insecurity; the extent to which existing federal assistance programs reduce childhood hunger and food insecurity; childhood hunger and food insecurity persistence, and the extent to which it is due to gaps in program coverage; and the inability of potential participants to access programs, or the insufficiency of program benefits or services.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-309-29284-9.

Keywords: Barriers, Children, Economic factors, Federal programs, Food consumption, Geographic factors, Hunger, Regional factors, Statistical data

Wiecha JL, Gannett E, Roth B. [2012]. Healthy eating in out-of-school time: The promise and the challenge. (Wellesley, MA): National Institute for Out-of-School TIme at Wellesley Centers for Women, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report explores healthy eating concepts among out-of-school time (OST) program administrators and examines their perception of the importance of the childhood obesity epidemic. It also explores the perceived barriers to serving healthful foods in OST programs and examines the potential utility of guidelines and other managerial supports in helping such programs adopt healthy eating practices.

Contact: Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481, Telephone: (781) 283-2500 Fax: (781) 283-2504 E-mail: wcw@wellesley.edu Web Site: http://www.wcwonline.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care services, Child nutrition, Food consumption, Guidelines, Health promotion, School age children

American Indian Healthy Eating Project in partnership with seven American Indian tribes in North Carolina. 2011. Tools for healthy tribes. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 45 pp.

Annotation: This kit contains information on specific policies and programs with the greatest potential to improve access to healthy, affordable foods within tribal communities. The goal is to strengthen the capacity of American Indian tribal leaders to develop, implement, and evaluate community change around healthy eating and active living. Topics include tribally-owned and operated community gardens and farmers' markets; Pow Wow food and beverage options; store, mobile, and vending initiatives; and family food activities.

Contact: U.S. Indian Health Service, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: https://www.ihs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Community programs, Food consumption, Nutrition, Physical activity, Policy development, Social change

Let's Move, White House Domestic Policy Council, U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and U.S. Department of Education. 2011. Let's Move in Indian Country. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior,

Annotation: This website provides information and resources from an interagency initiative to address childhood obesity and related conditions in American Indians and Alaska Natives. Topics include increasing physical activity and access to affordable, healthy, and traditional foods; supporting and leveraging Indian Country's help, expertise, and commitment; and public private partnerships to further support and expand upon the work happening throughout Indian Country. Resources include fact sheets, a newsletter, a call to action for tribal leaders, and a toolkit and resource guide.

Contact: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1849 C Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20240, Telephone: (202) 208-3100 E-mail: feedback@ios.doi.gov Web Site: http://www.doi.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: American Indians, Child health, Community participation, Food consumption, Health promotion, Native Americans, Obesity, Physical activity, Public private partnerships, Social learning

Let's Move in Indian Country Interagency Workgroup. 2011. Let's Move in Indian Country toolkit and resource guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior, 61 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit and guide provides information and resources from an interagency initiative to address childhood obesity and related conditions in American Indians and Alaska Natives. Contents include information about programs and funding opportunities, with step-by-step guides and checklists for accessing the resources. Topics include creating a healthier start in life for children; creating healthier learning communities; ensuring families access to healthy, affordable, and traditional foods; and increasing opportunities for physical activity. Additional resources for meeting varying needs of communities and operational capacities are included in the appendix.

Contact: U.S. Department of the Interior, 1849 C Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20240, Telephone: (202) 208-3100 E-mail: feedback@ios.doi.gov Web Site: http://www.doi.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Child health, Child nutrition, Community programs, Financing, Food consumption, Learning, Obesity, Physical activity

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.