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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 18 (18 total).

Hoynes HW, Schanzenbach DW, Almond D. 2012. Long run impacts of childhood access to the safety net. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 57 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18535)

Annotation: This paper examines the impact of a positive and policy-driven change in economic resources available in utero and during childhood. In particular, the paper focuses on the introduction of the Food Stamp Program, which was rolled out across counties in the United States between 1961 and 1975. The authors assembled data linking family background and county of residence in early childhood to adult health and economic outcomes. Findings are presented.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Economic factors, Families, Fetus, Food Stamp Program, Geographic factors, Infant health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Poverty, Pregnant women, Public policy, Research, Statistical data, Young children

Han W, Ruhm C, Waldfogel J, Washbrook E. 2009. Public policies and women's employment after childbearing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 45 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14660)

Annotation: This paper examines how the public policy environment in the United States affects work by new mothers following childbirth. The authors examine four types of policies that vary across states and affect the budget constraints in different ways. Specifically, the authors examine how state parental leave laws, child care subsidies, cash welfare and food stamp benefit generosity, and welfare work requirements for mothers of infants affect the employment patterns of mothers of newborns and young children.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Food stamp program, Parental leave, Public policy, Welfare services, Working mothers

Almond D, Hoynes HW, Schanzenbach DW. 2008. Inside the war on poverty: The impact of food stamps on birth outcomes. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic REsearch, 53 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14306)

Annotation: This paper evaluates the health impact of the Food Stamp Program (FSP) during the 1960s and 1970s. Specifically, the authors examine the impact of FSP rollout on birthweight, neonatal mortality, and fertility. The paper introduces FSP; discusses background literature, food stamps and infant health, data, and methodology; and presents results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Birthweight, Federal programs, Fertility, Food stamp program, Health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Pregnancy outcome, Research

Rosso R, Weill J. 2007. State of the States: A profile of food and nutrition programs across the nation. Washington, DC: Food Research and Action Center, annual.

Annotation: This report provides information on federal food and nutrition programs throughout the United States. Statistics are provided for the United States as a whole and for each state in the following areas: percentage of food-insecure households, demographics, and participation in the following programs: School Breakfast Program, National School Lunch Program, Summer Nutrition Program, Food Stamp Program, WIC, Child and Adult Care Food Program, The Emergency Food Assistance Program, and the Commodity Supplemental Food Program. Additional statistical information is presented in tables at the end of the report. A list of sources is included.

Contact: Food Research and Action Center, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 540, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2200 Fax: (202) 986-2525 Web Site: http://www.frac.org/ $12; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child nutrition programs, Commodity Supplemental Food Program, Federal programs, Food, Food Stamp Program, Hunger, Nutrition, Nutrition programs, Poverty, School breakfast programs, School lunch programs, WIC Program

Lee BJ, Mackey-Bilaver L, and Chin, . 2006. Effects of WIC and food stamp program participation on child outcomes. Washington, DC: Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 41 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the relationship between between WIC and Food Stamp Program participation and young children's health and mistreatment outcomes. The report, which includes an abstract and a summary, discusses the background of WIC and the Food Stamp Program, previous research, hypotheses, data and variables, statistical methods, findings, and limitations of the research and future directions. Conclusions and references are included. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes two appendices: (1) program participation and adverse health outcomes and (2) logistic regression results: WIC and Food Stamp Program Effects in Child Outcomes.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Federal programs, Food Stamp Program, MCH research, Maltreated children, Nutrition programs, Outcome evaluation, WIC Program, Young children

Cauthen NK, Dinan KA. 2005. Economic insecurity: Implications of federal budget proposals for low-income working families. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 8 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief shows how proposed cuts in Medicaid, food stamps, housing assistance, and child care will affect families' ability to meet their financial responsibilities. The brief uses hypothetical families in four major U.S. cities to illustrate the effects that can be expected nationwide if proposed budget cuts are implemented. A conclusion is offered, and endnotes are included. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Costs, Families, Food Stamp Program, Health insurance, Housing programs, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public assistance

Lin BH. 2005. Nutrition and health characteristics of low-income populations: Healthy eating index. Washington, DC: Economic Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 4 pp. (Agriculture information bulletin 796-1)

Annotation: This report provides major findings from the Nutrition and Health Characteristics of Low-Income Populations, which examined the Healthy Eating Index (HEI) using 1988-1994 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. The HEI measures how well American diets conform to recommended healthy eating patterns and provides a measure of overall dietary quality based on 10 dietary components. The report presents findings from all Americans ages 2 and over, Food Stamp Program participants, WIC participants, children and adolescents ages 5-18, and older Americans. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. Information sources are provided.

Contact: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, 1800 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-5831, Telephone: (202) 694-5050 E-mail: infocenterers.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.ers.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adult health, Child health, Food Stamp Program, Infant health, Low income groups, Nutrition surveys, Older adults, School age children, WIC

Coffey S, Holsclaw AH, Bosland J. 2005. Screening tools to help families access public benefits. Washington, DC: Institute for Youth, Education, and Families, 35 pp. (Special report)

Annotation: This publication is intended to provide a brief introduction for municipal officials to some of the approaches, considerations, and specific technology options for using benefits screening tools that connect eligible residents to key state and federal benefits. The publication includes an overview of benefits screening tools, a selection of nationally franchised tools, and a discussion of other approaches to benefits screening. Two appendices are included: (1) contact information and (2) additional resources about screening tools.

Contact: Institute for Youth, Education and Families, National League of Cities, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 550, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202)626-3013 Secondary Telephone: Fax: E-mail: cjohnson@nlc.org Web Site: http://www.nlc.org/find-city-solutions/institute-for-youth-education-and-families Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child care, Eligibility, Families, Federal programs, Food Stamp Program, Low income groups, Public assistance, Screening, State programs, Tax credits

Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program. 2004. The safety net in action: Protecting the health and nutrition of young American children. Boston, MA: Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the safety net that supports the access to nutritious food by infants, children, and their families. The report discusses the social and economic context of food insecurity; explains the meaning the food insecurity; describes Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, the Food Stamp Program, WIC, the Low-Income Energy Assistance Program, and subsidized housing; and includes a call to action. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. An appendix provides an overview of the Children's Sentinel Nutrition Assessment Program. The report concludes with a list of references and acknowledgments.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Families, Food stamp program, Housing programs, Infant health, Low income groups, Nutrition, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, WIC Program

Horner DC, Morrow B, Lazarus W. 2004. Building an on-ramp to children's health coverage: A report on California's Express Lane Eligibility Program. Washington, DC: Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured and Children's Partnership, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report documents results from California's Express Lane Eligibility (ELE) initiative through the school lunch program, which has been piloted in 72 schools and 5 school districts in the state. ELE is an enrollment strategy that targets large numbers of uninsured children, who are eligible for Medicaid and the State Children's Health Insurance Program, where they can be found, in other public programs like the School Lunch Program and the Food Stamp Program. The report provides background; explains how the program works, the design choices that went into its makeup, and how it began; presents early implementation results; and offers 10 guideposts for any state seeking to navigate the complexities of ELE. The report concludes with acknowledgments and endnotes.

Contact: Kaiser Program on Medicaid and the Uninsured, 1330 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (202) 347-5274 E-mail: http://www.kff.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://kff.org/about-kaiser-commission-on-medicaid-and-the-uninsured/ Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: California, Children, Eligibility, Enrollment, Food Stamp Program, Low income groups, Medicaid, School lunch program, Schools, State Children's Health Insurance Program, State programs, Uninsured persons

Pavetti L, Maloy K, Schott L. 2002. Promoting Medicaid and food stamp participation: Establishing eligibility procedures that support participation and meet families' needs—Final report. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research, 148 pp.

Annotation: This report, geared primarily toward policymakers, describes a study conducted to (1) identify state and local strategies for increasing participation in the Food Stamp Program, Medicaid, and the State Children's Heath Insurance Program (SCHIP), (2) examine the ways in which the procedures used to determine eligibility support or impede access to benefits, and (3) identify the challenges faced by organizations charged with administering these programs at the state and local levels. The report synthesizes findings from visits to 15 sites in 12 states. Statistics are presented in tables throughout the report. The report concludes with a list of references.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com $10.50, plus shipping and handling of $1.80; also available from the website.

Keywords: Eligibility, Families, Food stamp program, Low income groups, Medicaid, Outreach, Participation, Public policy, State children's health insurance program, Statistics

Kenney GM, Haley JM, Ullman F. 1999. Most uninsured children are in families served by the government programs. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 7 pp. (New federalism: National survey of America's families; Series B, no. B-4)

National Governors' Association, National Conference of State Legislatures, and American Public Welfare Association. 1996r. Analysis of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 conference agreement for H.R. 3734 (P.L. 104-193). [Online]. Washington, DC: National Governors' Association, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report provides commentary on the conference agreement for the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PL 104-193). For each of the major provisions of the act, the report explains its intent and clarifies the states' responsibilities for implementing it. The act itself makes modifications to welfare services within these topical areas: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), child care, Medicaid, social services, benefits for immigrants, supplemental security income (SSI), child protection, the Food Stamp program, child nutrition, electronic benefit transfer systems, and child support enforcement.

Contact: National Governors Association, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Child abuse, Child care, Child nutrition, Child support, Federal legislation, Food Stamp Program, Immigrants, Prevention programs, Social services, Supplemental security income, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Time limited benefits, Welfare reform

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1990. Food Stamp Program: Achieving cost neutrality in Washington's Family Independence Program. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 76 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the findings of a 5-year demonstration project conducted in Washington State beginning in 1987. The Family Independence Program combined several welfare-related programs, Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Medicaid and the Food Stamp Program, into a single grant package for recipients. The project was designed to test whether a coordinated approach worked better than separately administered programs to reduce recipient's long-term dependence on welfare. The General Accounting Office cited several methodology problems at both the state and federal levels. The 1987 act's requirement for an assurance of cost neutrality probably cannot be fully determined, however an approximation of program costs was achievable.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/RCED-90-84.

Keywords: Child health, Food Stamp Program, Maternal health, Nutrition

Burt M, Haffner D. 1986. Teenage childbearing: How much does it cost?—A guide to determining the local costs of teenage childbearing. Washington, DC: Center for Population Options, 87 pp.

Annotation: This handbook is designed to help community service professionals estimate the costs of adolescent childbearing in any state, county, city, or town. It is divided into three sections. Section A is an introduction to estimating the public costs of adolescent pregnancy. It defines the terms, summarizes Center for Population Option's national study on the costs of adolescent childbearing, and discusses the assumptions that were used. Section B addresses collecting the data needed for the study, and provides detailed worksheets and instructions for determining costs for any jurisdiction. A Lotus 1-2-3 program of the worksheets is available separately. Section C offers suggestions for using this data. A glossary and reference section are also included.

Contact: Advocates for Youth, 2000 M Street, N.W., Suite 750, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 419-3420 Fax: (202) 419-1448 Web Site: http://www.advocatesforyouth.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Costs, Food Stamp Program, Health care costs, Medicaid

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1986. Needs-based programs: Eligibility and benefit factors. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 53 pp.

Annotation: Fifty-four needs-based federal programs are described with regard to eligibility and benefit factors. Child nutrition programs are included. Cash programs, education programs, food programs, housing programs, medical programs, service programs, and jobs and employment programs are the other areas covered.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAP/HRD-86-107FS.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child nutrition, Commodity Supplemental Food Program, Food Stamp Program, Nutrition programs, Public health programs, Quality assurance, Supplemental food programs

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1986. Hunger counties: Methodological review of a report by the Physician Task Force on Hunger. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 48 pp. (Briefing report to congressional requesters)

Annotation: This report reviews the methodology used by the Physician Task Force on Hunger to produce the report entitle Hunger Counties 1986.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/PEMD-86-7BR.

Keywords: Evaluation, Food Stamp Program, Hunger, Poverty

Citizens' Board of Inquiry into Hunger and Malnutrition in the United States. 1968. Hunger, U.S.A.. Washington, DC: New Community Press, 100 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the extent to which Americans experience hunger, dispelling the myth that, because the United States is the wealthiest nation in the world, its citizens are all well fed. The report includes the following chapters: (1) The Mississippi story -- A case history in bureaucratic non-response, (2) documenting the extent of hunger and malnutrition in the United States, (3) the difficulty of documenting hunger and malnutrition in the United States, (4) analysis of food and welfare programs, (5) agricultural policy, and (6) recommendations of the Board of Inquiry. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. Two appendices include a glossary and brief descriptions of commodities distribution and food stamp programs. The report also includes a bibliography, footnotes, a map of the geographic distribution of hunger counties, and a table listing the 256 hunger counties.

Keywords: Food Stamp Program, Government programs, Hunger, Nutrition disorders, Poverty, Welfare

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.