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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 16 (16 total).

Children's Safety Network . 2014. Firearm-related injuries among youth ages 15 through 24. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network , 7 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about firearm-related injuries and deaths among adolescents and young adults ages 15-24 in the United States. Contents include data and information on the magnitude of the problem, its impact on various demographic groups, and the circumstances surrounding death and injury. A companion fact sheet addresses firearm injuries among children from birth through age 14. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Death, Firearm injuries, Firearm safety, Firearms, Young adults

Children's Safety Network . 2014. Firearm-related injuries among children ages 0 through 14. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network , 7 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about firearm-related injuries and deaths among infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 14 in the United States. Contents include data and information on the scope of the problem, the demographics of and circumstances surrounding firearm-related injuries to children, international comparison, and early prevention and safety education. Information on legislation and examples of state efforts to prevent firearm-related injuries to children is also included. A companion fact sheet addressing firearm injuries among adolescents and young adults ages 15 through 24 is also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Death, Firearm injuries, Firearm safety, Firearms, Infants, Prevention programs, Protective factors

Philadelphia Child Death Review Teams. 2013. Child death review report 2009-2010. [Philadelphia, PA]: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, Medical Examiner's Office, 41 pp.

Annotation: This report describes and discusses child deaths that occurred in Philadelphia in 2009 and 2010 and that were reviewed by the Philadelphia Child Death Review Team. The report provides background and an overview of child deaths reviewed during the period and discusses infant deaths, natural deaths, unintentional injury deaths, and intentional injury deaths.

Contact: Philadelphia Department of Public Health, 1401 JFK Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19102, Telephone: (215) 686-45200 Fax: (215) 686-5212 Web Site: http://www.phila.gov/health/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Asthma, Cancer, Child abuse, Child death, Child death review, Cause of death, Child neglect, Drowning, Firearm injuries, Infant death, Intentional injuries, Poisoning, SIDS, Unintentional injuries

Children's Defense Fund. 2010. Protect children, not guns. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 24 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the incidence of fatal and nonfatal firearm injuries to children and adolescents. Text provides general information, and several tables provide statistical information about firearm deaths to children and adolescents.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent morbidity, Adolescent mortality, Child morbidity, Child mortality, Firearm injuries, Firearms, Safety

Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center and University of Washington. 2007. Best practices in prevention-oriented child death review: Providing prevention-oriented, evidence-based resources for child death review teams. [Seattle, WA]: Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center,

Annotation: This Web site assists Child Death Review (CDR) team members and other public health professionals work to prevent child injury death. It examines a range of interventions designed to prevent youth injury and death due to drowning, suicide, firearms, child abuse, and motor vehicle crashes, the top causes of injury for children ages 0 to 18 living in Washington State. For each injury mechanism, interventions are identified, reviewed, and rated on the strength and quality of published evidence supporting the efficacy of the intervention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Harborview Injury Prevention and Research Center, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359960, Seattle, WA 98104, Telephone: (206) 744-9430 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (206) 744-9962 E-mail: hiprc@u.washington.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/hiprc/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent death, Child abuse, Child death, Drowning, Firearms, Injury prevention, Intervention, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Suicide, Suicide prevention, Unintentional injuries, Washington

McCurley C, Snyder HN. 2004. Victims of violent juvenile crime. Rockville, MD: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 8 pp. (Juvenile justice bulletin)

Annotation: This bulletin draws on key findings derived from data from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's National Incident-Based Reporting System to develop a statistical profile of juvenile crime. Tables, figures, and an accompanying analysis offer perspectives on characteristics of offenders and victims, including age, gender, and relationship; types of offenses, including aggravated and simple assault, sexual assault, and robbery; the unlawful use of firearms; and injuries. A methods section and a data source note are also included.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Secondary Telephone: (301)240-7760 Fax: 301-240-5830 Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NCJ 201628.

Keywords: Assault, Crime, Data, Firearms, Injuries, Juvenile delinquency, Offenders, Sexual assault, Victims

Christoffel KK, Runyan CW, eds. 1995. Adolescent injuries: Epidemiology and prevention. Philadelphia, PA: Hanley and Belfus, 240 pp. (Adolescent medicine: State of the art reviews; v. 6, no. 2)

Annotation: This book contains a collection of essays by individual authors; each addresses some aspect of the epidemiology and prevention of adolescent injuries. The individual essays follow a brief commentary on methodological and conceptual issues. Topics covered are: traffic-related injuries, drowning, suicide, the role of handguns in homicides among adolescents and young adults, family violence and development during adolescence, occupational injuries, adolescent injury prevention in primary care, peer violence prevention programs in middle and high schools, post-traumatic stress disorder, and the role of mass media in injury causation and prevention.

Contact: Hanley and Belfus, 210 South 13th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, Telephone: (215) 546-4995 Contact Phone: (800) 962-1892 $33.00, no shipping and handling charge if prepaid. Document Number: ISBN 1-56053-190-8.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescents, Drowning, Epidemiology, Family violence, Firearms, High schools, Homicide, Injuries, Mass media, Middle schools, Motor vehicle injuries, Occupational injuries, Peer groups, Physician patient relations, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Prevention, Prevention programs, Primary care, School based programs, Suicide, Violence prevention, Young adults

Arizona Department of Health Services, Community and Family Health Services, Child Fatality Review Program. 1994-. Arizona Child Fatality Review Team: Annual report. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Department of Health Services, Child Fatality Review Program, annual.

Annotation: This annual report summarizes the activities of the Arizona Child Fatality Review Team for the year covered. It includes an executive summary and introduction, presents major findings on causes of death to children and adolescents, outlines accomplishments and challenges and presents policy recommendations. Data are included for motor vehicle crashes; drownings; smoke inhalation and burns; violence related deaths due to suicide, child abuse, homicide, and shooting deaths; and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Appendices include state statutes, statistical tables on the leading causes of death, lists of state and local team members, and a publications list.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, Child Fatality Review Program, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 150 N. 18th Avenue, Suite 320, Phoenix, AZ 85007, E-mail: newbers@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/owch/cfr.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Arizona, Burns, Cause of death, Child abuse, Child death review, Children, Demographics, Drowning, Firearm injuries, Fires, Homicide, Mortality, Motor vehicle injuries, Program descriptions, SIDS, Statistics, Suicide, Violence

Children's Safety Network. 1994. Building safe communities: State and local strategies for preventing injury and violence. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 190 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides descriptions of injury prevention projects implemented in several states. These projects were carried out by state and local departments of health, and by other health/injury-related entities. Interventions cover 12 specific injuries and two overarching contributing factors—firearms and alcohol. For each project, the manual describes the problem, the project objective(s), components, maternal and child health (MCH) role, resources needed, lessons learned, and evaluation. These cases represent concrete examples of what has been tried, what has worked, and what has not. The case studies are indexed by age group protected, by primary target audience, by state, and by MCH setting. Appendices include nine key injury prevention activities for state MCH agencies, and a sample case study format. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Alcohol, Assault, Bicycles, Burns, Case studies, Correlates of injury, Drowning, Evaluation, Family violence, Firearms, Homicide, Injury prevention, Motor vehicles, Occupational injuries, Playgrounds, Program development, Residential injuries, Sexual abuse, Sports, Suicide

Ray LU, Yuwiler J. 1994. Child and adolescent fatal injury databook. San Diego, CA: San Diego State University, Children's Safety Network Injury Data Technical Assistance Center, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This data book provides a detailed look at fatal injuries in 1991 for children and adolescents ages 0–24 years. Data for the nation and for each state are identified by age, gender, and race. An insert sheet provides information on 1991 fatal firearm injuries. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Injury Prevention Policy and Practice, San Diego State University, 6475 Alvarado Road, Suite 105, San Diego, CA 92120, Telephone: (619) 594-3691 Fax: (619) 594-1995 E-mail: kmjones@projects.sdu.edu Web Site: http://www.cippp.org/ Available in libraries. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHH063.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Demographics, Firearms, Injuries, Mortality, Statistics

Schwartz DF, ed. 1992. Children and violence. Columbus, OH: Ross Laboratories, 130 pp. (Report of the Twenty-third Ross Roundtable on Critical Approaches to Common Pediatric Problems)

Annotation: This session of the Ross Roundtable was convened to explore some roles in helping children deal with the violence in their lives. These roles typically could be played by the professionals who care for children's health e.g. pediatricians. Presented were broad themes and issues that cut across the entire experience of children and violence. Subjects of discussion include firearms; and gang, urban, rural, domestic, and media violence. The conference was seen as a first discussion for pediatricians of the impact of violence and possible interventions. The Roundtable hopes to revisit these issues.

Contact: Ross Laboratories, Consumer Relations, 625 Cleveland Avenue, Columbus, OH 43215-1724, Telephone: (800) 227-5767 Secondary Telephone: (614) 624-7485 Contact Phone: (614) 227-3333 Web Site: http://www.ross.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior, Children, Counseling, Data, Domestic violence, Firearms, Gangs, Health professionals, Homicide, Hospitals, Injuries, Intervention, Media violence, Pediatricians, Prevention, Rural population, Urban population, Violence, War, Witnesses

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1991. Accidental shootings: Many deaths and injuries caused by firearms could be prevented. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the high incidence of accidental shootings and the methods by which accidental shootings can be prevented. The study asserts that 31 percent of accidental deaths might be prevented by the addition of two safety devices: a child-proof safety device and a loading indicator. The GAO also approximates that 105 injuries for each death occur due to accidental shooting. The report recommends that safety devices and any other preventive measures that would reduce accidental shooting be implemented.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/PEMD-91-9.

Keywords: Engineering, Firearm injuries, Firearms, Gun control, Handguns, Injury prevention, Legislation, Prevention, Safety equipment, Technology, Unintentional injuries

Trauma Foundation. 1991. An advocate's guide to the cost of injury in the United States. San Francisco, CA: Trauma Foundation, 40 slides.

Annotation: This scripted presentation was adapted from a report entitled "Cost of Injury In the United States: A Report to Congress, 1989" which was prepared by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and the Johns Hopkins University at the request of Congress and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. It provides some data on injury types and causes, with motor vehicles and firearms accounting for 50 percent. The information presented illustrates that beyond social and emotional costs, injuries have a devastating economic price. Six areas of injury are discussed: motor vehicles, firearms, falls, poisonings, drownings, and fire and burns. The guide presents information from this report in graphic form in order to provide useful tools to advocates who will explain the economic consequences of the problem of violence in the United States.

Contact: Trauma Foundation, San Francisco General Hospital, Building One, Room 300, San Francisco, CA 94110, Telephone: (415) 821-8209 Fax: (415) 821-8202 E-mail: tf@traumaaf.org Web Site: http://www.traumaf.org $95.00.

Keywords: Advocacy, Advocacy, Audiovisual materials, Burns, Costs, Drowning, Falls, Firearms, Fires, Injuries, Injuries--types, causes, agents, Injury prevention, Injury severity, Injury surveillance systems, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicles, Poisons, Resources for professionals, Slides, Statistics, Tobacco, Training materials, Trauma care

Children's Safety Network. 1991. A data book of child and adolescent injury. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 69 pp., 41 slides.

Annotation: This data book and a related set of slides present information on the nature and incidence of unintentional and intentional injuries among U.S. children and adolescents ages 1–19. The book is divided into five sections: (1) Overview—comparisons between injury and diseases, international comparisons; (2) mortality—major causes of injury by developmental stage, mortality data compared to morbidity data; (3) unintentional injury—motor vehicles, pedestrians, bicycles, drowning and near drowning, fires and burns, unintentional firearms, poisoning, falls, occupational injuries, farm injuries, sports, toys and recreational equipment; (4) violence—homicide, assault, suicide, child abuse and neglect, rape; and (5) interventions—chart by age group, the cost of injury, suggestions for ways to prevent child and adolescent injury. An appendix presents 1988 injury mortality rates for children ages 1–4, 5–9, 10–14, and 15–19, for 11 major injury categories. Federal agencies contributing data include the National Center for Health Statistics, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Consumer Product Safety Commission, Department of Justice, and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Publication and slides available for loan; publication also available from ERIC Document Reproduction Service, 7420 Fullerton Road, Suite 110, Springfield, VA 22153-2852. Telephone: (800) 443-ERIC / e-mail: EDRS@inet.ed.gov / website: http://edrs.com/; gopher://edrs.com. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHE049; MCHF098 (slides), MCHF108 (brochure); book ERIC ED 342 152.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Advocacy, Audiovisual materials, Child development, Child health, Children, Costs, Data, Firearm injuries, Infants, Injuries, Integration, Morbidity, Mortality, Occupational injuries, Planning, Preschool children, Recreational injuries, Residential injuries, Safety equipment, Schools, Slides, Suicide, Toddlers, Transportation injuries, Violence

Children's Safety Network. 1991. Child Health Day 1991: A selected annotated bibliography. [Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health], 31 pp.

Annotation: This annotated bibliography includes items recommended by members of the planning committee for Child Health Day 1991. Sections of the bibliography address overviews of injury issues; injury data; program components (overview, program development, advocacy, coalition building, and training); and injury types and causes (overview, bicycles, child care, drowning, falls, firearms, fire/burns, motor vehicles, occupational injuries, pedestrians, playgrounds, sports, toys, and violence). The bibliography also contains resource lists. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Phone: (703) 625-7802 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHE014.

Keywords: Advocacy, Bicycles, Burns, Child Care, Children, Coalitions, Curricula, Data, Directories, Drowning, Educational materials, Falls, Firearms, Fires, Health observances, Injury prevention, Motor vehicles, Occupational injuries, Pedestrians, Playgrounds, Program development, Sports, Toys, Traffic safety, Violence

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Violence and abuse in the United States. Prevention Report. pp. 1-12. February 1991.,

Annotation: This issue of "Prevention Report" provides statistics on death and disability caused by violent and abusive behaviors in the United States. The report includes a graph of homicide rates for black males aged 15-24, from 1978-1987, divided by firearm- and nonfirearm-related deaths. The newsletter also includes descriptions of recent injury articles and publications, and a list of government and nonprofit organizations which may be useful resources on intentional injury prevention.

Contact: National Health Information Center, Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite LL100, Rockville, MD 20852, Fax: (240) 453-8281 E-mail: info@nhic.org Web Site: http://www.health.gov/nhic Single copies available at no charge.

Keywords: Blacks, Child abuse, Firearms, Homicide, Injury prevention, Men, Statistics, Suicide, Unintentional injuries, Violence, Weapons, Young adults

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.