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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (53 total).

Perinatal Periods of Risk Work Group. n.d.. Perinatal Periods of Risk approach: The U.S. urban experience—A new community approach to fetal and infant mortality. [Omaha, NE: CityMatCH], 33 pp.

Annotation: These annotated slides outline a presentation on prevention efforts to improve fetal and infant mortality using an approach, called Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR), developed by the World Health Organization for developing countries and applying concepts to urban efforts in the United States. It highlights five major steps: (1) engaging community partners, (2) mapping feto-infant mortality, (3) focusing on reducing the overall feto-infant mortality rate, (4) examining potential opportunity gaps, and (5) targeting further investigations and prevention efforts. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community coordination, Developing countries, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, International health, Needs assessment, Prevention, Risk assessment, Statistical analysis

Kuklish S. n.d.. Combating infant mortality: Perinatal periods of risk analysis–A comparison of 2000-2002 and 2003-2005 birth cohort results. Phoenix, AZ: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 21 pp.

Annotation: This electronic file presents PowerPoint-type slides that describe the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) analysis process and findings from a study of a reference group of individuals in Arizona that include a chart of feto-infant death, how different data can lead to potential actions, and changes between the first (2000-2002) and second (2003-2005) cohorts. Data are analyzed according to ethnicity, age, and level of education. It concludes with a statement of which groups and which periods on the prenatal-infancy continuum need to be focused on.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 150 N. 18th Ave., Suite 320, Phoenix, AZ 85007, Telephone: (602) 364-1400 Fax: (602) 364- 1495 E-mail: sjolans@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/owch/index.htm Out of print.

Keywords: Arizona, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, State surveys

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program. 2013. Using the FIMR process for improving birth and life course outcomes. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 video (60 min.).

Annotation: This one-hour webinar discusses the National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) Program as well as the Baltimore City FIMR program called B'more for Healthy Babies. Topics include data trends from Baltimore, Maryland, on fetal and infant mortality; efforts undertaken to reduce the number of deaths in the state; studies on program elements to raise awareness of behaviorally modifiable actions in premature or low birthweight deliveries, sleep related infant deaths, and substance use by pregnant women or new parents; creating and maintaining partnerships in communities and neighborhoods, as well as identifying stress and mental health issues in women during preconception, pregnancy, or postpartum periods. The addition of life course theory elements into the FIMR program and outcomes is also discussed.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Life course, Maryland, Program descriptions, State programs

Jackson County Prenatal Task Force. 2013. 2013 strategic action plan. Jackson, MI: Jackson County Prenatal Task Force, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines goals, outcome measures, and strategies to reduce infant mortality and improve infant health in Jackson County, Mississippi. Contents include data on infant mortality, adolescent and unintended pregnancy, racial disparities, prenatal care, smoking during pregnancy, infant death due to positional asphyxia, and infant sleep position and environment. The plan presents strategies to improve women's sexual health and experience of care before, during, and after pregnancy, as well as strategies to reduce the number of infant deaths due to positional asphyxia.

Contact: Jackson County Prenatal Task Force, One Jackson Square, 9th Floor, Jackson, MI Telephone: (517) 780-7306 Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, County programs, Fetal death, Goals, Infant care, Infant death, Infant health, Infant mortality, Local initiatives, Measures, Mississippi, Prenatal care, Program development, Program improvement, Strategic plans

Barnes-Josiah D. 2012. Using PPOR in an exploration of infant mortality trends Nebraska, 1979-2010. Lincoln, NE: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 42 slides.

Annotation: This resource, a presentation at the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists 2012 annual conference, compares data on infant mortality rates in the United States and Nebraska, examines points where the Nebraska rate exceeded the U.S. rate, and describes using Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) categories in an attempt to understand these rates.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Contact author for cost information.

Keywords: Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Nebraska, State surveys

National Center for Cultural Competence and National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Resource Center. 2011. Cultural and linguistic competence self-assessment for fetal and infant mortality review programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 2 parts.

Annotation: This webinar discusses the concepts of cultural and linguistic competence as they apply to the Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) process and reviews the benefits, principles, and potential approaches to cultural and linguistic competence self-assessments that are appropriate for FIMR programs. The webinar also discusses the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Organizational Assessment Instrument for FIMR programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Assessment, Fetal mortality, Infant death review committees, Language barriers, Multimedia, Programs

Kasehagen L, Gilbert C. 2011. Perinatal Periods of Risk: Using data and community involvement to prevent infant mortality. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This archived webcast outlines the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) analysis from start to finish, showing where the numbers come from, how to make PPOR maps, and how to use phase 2 analysis to help make the greatest impact on local infant mortality. The session also explains the role of community stakeholders and what communities need in order to use PPOR successfully. The website provides audio, slides with captioning, and transcripts of the webcast.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community coordination, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Multimedia, Prevention, Risk assessment

California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health Program. 2011. Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) Program: Policies and procedures [rev. ed.]. [Sacramento, CA]: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health Program, 10 pp.

Annotation: This manual for California discusses background of the California Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) Program, local FIMR activities, key personnel, standardized data collection and reporting, trainings and meetings, product and publication approval, and annual reports.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Fetal mortality, Final reports, Infant death review committees, Infant mortality, State programs, Statistical data, Training

Michalski K, Gathirimu J, Benton A, Swain G, Gass E, Ngui E. 2010. 2010 City of Milwaukee fetal infant mortality review (FIMR) report: Understanding and preventing infant death and stillbirth in Milwaukee—2005-2008 stillbirths and infant deaths. Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Health Department, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is the fifth of its kind produced since 1995, summarizes what is known about factors that contribute to Milwaukee's high number of stillbirths and infant deaths in an effort to reduce infant mortality and eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality. The report explains what the Fetal Infant Mortality Review is and discusses Milwaukee's infant mortality rate, racial disparities, cause of infant death and stillbirth in Milwaukee from 2005 to 2008, risk factors for infant death and stillbirth, autopsies and medical follow-up, social inequality and infant mortality, and community activities.

Contact: City of Milwaukee Health Department, 841 North Broadway, 3rd Floor, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3653, Telephone: (414) 286-3521 Web Site: http://city.milwaukee.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Ethnic factors, Fetal death, Infant death, Infant death review committees, Infant mortality, Prevention, Racial factors, Risk factors, Wisconsin

Milwaukee Health Department. 2010. Infant mortality. Milwaukee, WI: Milwaukee Health Department,

Annotation: This website provides information about infant mortality in Milwaukee. It includes an overview of infant mortality and discusses leading causes, other factors affecting the infant mortality rate, and Fetal Infant Mortality Review. Links to additional infant mortality resources are provided.

Contact: City of Milwaukee Health Department, 841 North Broadway, 3rd Floor, Milwaukee, WI 53202-3653, Telephone: (414) 286-3521 Web Site: http://city.milwaukee.gov/health Available from the website.

Keywords: Congenital abnormalities, Fetal death, Infant death, Infant death review committees, Infant mortality, Premature infants, Racial factors, Risk factors, SIDS, State surveys, Wisconsin

Vishnubhakta V. 2010. Perinatal Periods of Risk analysis. Dover, DE: Delaware Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report provides details of feto-infant mortality in Delaware during 2001-2005, as the second of five steps in the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) analysis. It describes the PPOR process, discusses how the data are calculated, and presents tables of data in numerous categories.

Contact: Delaware Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Jesse Cooper Building, 417 Federal Street, Dover, DE 19901, Telephone: (302) 744-4700 Secondary Telephone: (888) 459-2943 Fax: (302) 739-6659 E-mail: dhssinfo@state.de.us Web Site: http://www.dhss.delaware.gov/dhss/dph/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Delaware, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Prevention, Risk assessment, State surveys

Craig J, Conard T, Vaughn S. 2010. Integrating PPOR into MCH programs: Marion County, Indiana = PPOR for the Long Haul in Marion County Indiana. [no place,no publisher], 12 pp.

Annotation: This document presents graphics illustrating results of a Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) analysis of 2001-2005 deaths in Marion County, Indiana. It itemizes risk factors for very low birthweight infants, causes of postneonatal death including sudden unexpected infant death, and strategic actions to improve birth outcomes. It also discusses how PPOR became a part of the fetal and infant mortality review (FIMR) process and Indianapolis Healthy Start, the need for safe sleep education, and the local health systems action plan.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Fetal mortality, Indiana, Infant mortality, State surveys

MacDorman MF, Kirmeyer S. 2009. The challenge of fetal mortality. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 8 pp. (NCHS data brief, no. 16)

Annotation: This report examines data from the National Vital Statistics System for fetal death of 20 weeks gestation or more. Topics include the impact of fetal mortality on families, recent trends, differences among racial and ethnic groups, rates among twins or other multiple pregnancies, relationship between fetal mortality and maternal age, and fetal mortality rates by number of previous pregnancies.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Ethnic factors, Fetal death, Fetal mortality, Maternal age, Multiple pregnancy, National surveys, Population surveillance, Pregnancy loss, Racial factors, Statistical data, Statistics

Agarwal N, Banternghansa C, Bui L. 2009. Toxic exposure in America: Estimating fetal and infant health outcomes. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 56 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 14977)

Annotation: The paper examines the effect of exposure to toxic releases on infant and fetal mortality rates in the United States between 1989 and 2002, and presents data, methodology, results, study diagnostics, and policy implications.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Environmental factors, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Poisoning

Goode TD, Bronheim S, Buckley K. 2009. Cultural and linguistic competence organizational assessment instrument for fetal and infant mortality review programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 11 pp.

Annotation: This organizational self-assessment instrument is intended to help fetal and infant mortality review programs (FIMRs) to (1) plan for and incorporate culturally and linguistically competent policies, structures, and practices in all aspects of their work; (2) enhance the quality of case reviews and action plans within diverse and underserved communities; and (3) promote cultural and linguistic competence as an essential approach in the elimination of disparities and the promotion of health and mental health equity. The instrument gives definitions of terms used in the instrument, and a series of statements to assess the organization in these areas: (1) world view and practices related to cultural and linguistic competence; (2) staff diversity and training; (3) core functions including information gathering, case review, and community engagement; and (4) infrastructure, and funding. A companion document provides guidance on the use of this assessment tool. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Questionnaires, Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Fetal death, Health promotion, Infant death review, Infant mortality, Local programs, Low income groups, Mental health, Underserved communities

Goode TD, Bronheim S, Buckley K. 2009. A guide for using the Cultural and Linguistic Competence Organizational Assessment instrument for fetal and infant mortality review programs. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 27 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance on using an accompanying self-assessment instrument to evaluate the cultural and linguistic competence of fetal and infant mortality review programs (FIMRs). It describes the benefits, values, and principles of self-assessment for organizations; the nature of the instrument; and a recommended four-phase approach to organizational self-assessment. It also provides answers to frequently asked questions; definitions of key terms; and a process for community engagement in self-assessment, including a focus group protocol. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Cultural competence, Cultural diversity, Fetal death, Guidelines, Health promotion, Infant death review, Infant mortality, Local programs, Low income groups, Mental health, Underserved communities

Urban Indian Health Institute. 2009. Fact sheet: Fetal and infant deaths and perinatal periods of risk among American Indians and Alaska Natives in Washington. Seattle, WA: Urban Indian Health Institute, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet compares the rate of all races of infants and American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) infants who die before their first birthdays and describes the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) Project which looked at the data for deaths between 2000 and 2004 to better understand these rates. It includes a discussion of preventable deaths and opportunities for change.

Contact: Urban Indian Health Institute, Seattle Indian Health Board, P.O. Box 3364, Seattle, WA 98114, Telephone: (206) 812-3030 Fax: (206) 812-3044 E-mail: info@uihi.org Web Site: http://www.uihi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, State data, Washington

March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation. 2008. Miscarriage. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes, (Quick reference and fact sheets)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides a description of miscarriage, outlines what is known about why it occurs, symptoms, treatment, tests, causes of repeat miscarriage, recovery times, and how long a woman should wait before attempting another pregnancy. References are provided.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com .

Keywords: Fetal death, Fetal mortality, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy loss, Spontaneous abortion

National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program. 2008. Fetal and infant mortality review manual: A guide for communities. (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program, 169 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides communities interested in developing a new Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) Program, or continuing an existing FIMR program, with a step-by-step guide for implementing FIMR and making systems change happen for women, infants, and familles through FIMR. Contents include a description of the FIMR process, laying the groundwork, building community support and collaboration, abstracting medical records and conducting the home interview, basic team building and group process concepts for FIMR programs, the role of the case review team, the role of the community action team, taking stock of the FIMR process, and other maternal and child case review and related processes and the opportunities for collaboration. Standard definitions for reporting selected perinatal health statistics, and a glossary of terms, diagnoses and procedures is also included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review Program, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, S.W.***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 863-2587 E-mail: nfimr@acog.org Web Site: http://www.nfimr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death review, Collaboration, Fetal death, Infant death review, Infant mortality, Investigations, Manuals, Neonatal death, Program development, Surveillance

Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department, Community Health Services, Office of Assessment. 2008. Mobilizing communities to action: Perinatal periods of risk (PPOR) approach to infant mortality in Hamilton County, TN 2001-2005. Chattanooga, TN: Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department, 41 pp.

Annotation: This report examines historical and current trends in infant mortality, low birthweight, and prematurity in Chattanooga and Hamilton County, Tennessee, describes the Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) analysis of 2001-2005 data, and provides recommendations for action.

Contact: Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department, 921 East Third Street, Chattanooga, TN 37403, Telephone: (423) 209-8000 Secondary Telephone: (423) 209-8229 Web Site: http://health.hamiltontn.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Fetal mortality, Infant mortality, Local surveys, State surveys, Tennessee

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.