Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (40 total).

Kessel R. n.d.. Diagnostic and Followup Project for Native American Children in Wisconsin with Special Health Care Needs = WINGS Project [Final report]. Madison, WI: Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin at Madison , 42 pp.

Annotation: This project was part of an ongoing effort to identify and address issues related to developmental disabilities among Native American children in Wisconsin to assure that proper diagnostic and followup services are provided to this population. Tribes, State and local agencies, and volunteer organizations were involved in a collaborative effort to design and establish a long-term, community-based, high quality program in each tribal community in Wisconsin to serve the special health care needs of Native American children. The two main goals of the project were to: (1) Become an integral part of the tribal service systems, and (2) improve those systems in such a way that they address both the needs of developmentally disabled children and the issues related to the prevention of disabilities. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-161941.

Keywords: American Indians, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

Fond M, Kendall-Taylor N, Volmert A, Pineau MG, L’Hôte E. 2017. Seeing the spectrum: Mapping the gaps between expert and public understandings of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Manitoba. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an empirically-based framing strategy for communicating about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Contents include a set of principles reflecting expert understanding of what fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is, how alcohol affects fetal development, why women consume alcohol while pregnant, what the effects of FASD are, and how FASD can be prevented and addressed. The report also describes shared but implicit understandings, assumptions, and patterns of reasoning that shape how the public thinks about FASD, points at which expert and public understandings overlap and diverge, and key challenges in communicating about FASD. Recommendations are included.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Beliefs, Communication, Culturally competent services, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prevention services, Research, Trauma care

National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2016. A report on the status of fetal and infant mortality review in the United States 2015 = U.S. fetal and infant mortality review: 2015 status report. Washington, DC: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, 25 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a national survey of state and local Fetal and Infant Mortality (FIMR) coordinators about their FIMR team structure, process, and activities. Contents include information about operations at the local level to examine medical, nonmedical, and systems-related factors and circumstances contributing to fetal and infant deaths. Information about FIMR and child death review collaboration is also included. Survey results are provided in a set of tables following the narrative. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Fatality Review and Prevention, c/o Michigan Public Health Institute, 1115 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (800) 656-2434 Secondary Telephone: (517) 614-0379 Fax: (517) 324-6009 E-mail: info@childdeathreview.org Web Site: https://www.ncfrp.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, Community based services, County programs, Fetal death, Infant death, Infant death review committees, Injury prevention, Local initiatives, Outcome and process assessment, Program coordination, Systems development, Teamwork

Currie J, Zivin JSG, Meckel K, Neidell MJ, Schlenker W. 2013. Something in the water: Contaminated drinking water and infant health. Cambridge, Ma: National Bureau of Economic Research, 30 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18876)

Annotation: This paper provides estimates of the effects of in utero exposure to contaminated drinking water on fetal health. The study examined birth records and drinking water testing results for the state of New Jersey from 1997 to 2007 to compare outcomes across siblings who were potentially exposed to differing levels of harmful contaminants from drinking water while in utero. Topics include an overview of research on air and water pollution on fetal development; study methodology and its difficulties; a discussion of maternal characteristics of mobility and education during the study; exposure to water contamination and its effects on low birth weight, prematurity, and other birth outcomes; and conclusions on further research.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Environmental exposure, Fetal development, Infant health, New Jersey, State surveys, Water pollution

Jackson County Prenatal Task Force. 2013. 2013 strategic action plan. Jackson, MI: Jackson County Prenatal Task Force, 6 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines goals, outcome measures, and strategies to reduce infant mortality and improve infant health in Jackson County, Mississippi. Contents include data on infant mortality, adolescent and unintended pregnancy, racial disparities, prenatal care, smoking during pregnancy, infant death due to positional asphyxia, and infant sleep position and environment. The plan presents strategies to improve women's sexual health and experience of care before, during, and after pregnancy, as well as strategies to reduce the number of infant deaths due to positional asphyxia.

Contact: Jackson County Prenatal Task Force, One Jackson Square, 9th Floor, Jackson, MI Telephone: (517) 780-7306 Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Community action, County programs, Fetal death, Goals, Infant care, Infant death, Infant health, Infant mortality, Local initiatives, Measures, Mississippi, Prenatal care, Program development, Program improvement, Strategic plans

Aizer A, Stroud L, Buka S. 2012. Maternal stress and child outcomes: Evidence from siblings. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 35 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18422)

Annotation: This paper estimates the impact of in-utero exposure to stress on the human capital accumulation (years of schooling) of adult offspring using a unique dataset with detailed information on parental characteristics, including prenatal levels of the hormone cortisol (a marker for stress) and offspring outcomes. The authors also explore how prenatal stress interacts with maternal human capital. The paper provides background information on the relationship between stress, cortisol, prenatal conditions, and offspring outcomes; describes the empirical strategy and data, and presents empirical results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational attainment, Fetal development, Hormones, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Poverty, Pregnancy, Research, Statistical data, Stress

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Lifespan Health Services. 2012. PRAMS and ... preconception health. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for Nebraska women provides an explanation of preconception health and why it is important across a woman's lifespan, not just during the reproductive years. Topics include why planning pregnancies is important, use of birth control, health insurance, how tobacco and alcohol use influences birth outcomes; how women can reduce their risks for poor birth outcomes. Statistical data is provided throughout the fact sheet.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Fetal development, Fetal viability, Life cycle, Nebraska, Pregnant women, Risk factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Women', s health

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. 2011. How your baby grows during pregnancy. Washington, DC: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 3 pp. (FAQ)

Annotation: This pamphlet, which is intended for consumers, explains how pregnancy begins, how the fetus grows and develops, how the body changes during pregnancy, and how to calculate a due date. Illustrations of the fetus at each month of pregnancy and of women's bodies during pregnancy are included. The pamphlet also contains a glossary of terms.

Contact: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street S.W., P.O. Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920, Telephone: (202) 638-5577 Secondary Telephone: (202) 863-2518 E-mail: resources@acog.org Web Site: http://www.acog.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Fetal development, Pregnancy, Women', s health

Barry KL, Caetano R, Chang G, DeJoseph MC, Miller LA, O'Connor MJ, Olson, HC, Floyd RL, Weber MK, DeStefano F, Dolina S, Leeks K. 2009. Reducing alcohol-exposed pregnancies: A Report of the National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect. Atlanta, GA: National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies community-level fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) interventions and policies that can prevent fetal alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEDs) and reduce the prevalence of physical, mental, behavioral, and learning disabilities due to prenatal alcohol exposure. Topics also include an epidemiological overview, screening for women at risk, current evidence, prevention interventions, and recommendations and future research directions.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol, Early intervention, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention, Screening, Substance abusing pregnant women

Minnesota Department of Health. 2009. If you are pregnant: Information on fetal development, abortion and alternatives. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, 26 pp.

Annotation: This booklet, which is geared toward pregnant women, provides information on fetal development in 2-week intervals, from implantation to birth. It is illustrated with photographs of a fetus at different stages of developments. The booklet also provides information on the methods of abortion and the medical risks associated with abortion. In addition, the booklet discusses possible emotional side effects of abortion, the possibility of fetal pain, and some common medical risks associated with carrying an infant to term. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, P.O. Box 64975, St. Paul, MN 55164-0975, Telephone: (651) 201-5000 Secondary Telephone: (888) 345-0823 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Consumer education materials, Fetal development, High risk pregnancy, Pregnancy, Spanish language materials

Harrison E, Partelow J, Grason H. 2009. Environmental toxicants and maternal and child health: An emerging public health challenge. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of environmental toxicants with regard to preconception and perinatal health, summarizes efforts to inform women and health care providers, outlines possible strategies for increasing awareness and surveillance efforts, and identifies resources for additional information for public health professionals. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4143, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 502-5450 Fax: (410) 502-5831 Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/wchpc Available from the website.

Keywords: Fetal development, Pregnant women, Reproduction, Toxicology

FASD Regional Training Centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. [2008]. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Competency-based curriculum development guide for medical and allied health education and practice. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ca. 280 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This purpose of this curriculum development guide is to enhance the knowledge and skills of health care providers to recognize and prevent fetal alcohol spectrum (FAS) disorders by aiding in the development of educational programs and materials. The guide is organized by three types of learning outcomes: competencies, learning goals, and learning objectives, allowing educators or trainers to select goals and objectives appropriate for participants' learning needs and skill levels, along with university or organization criteria. Chapter contents include seven competency topics: foundation; screening and brief interventions; models of addiction; biological effects of alcohol on the fetus; screening, diagnosis, and assessment of FAS; treatment across the lifespan for persons with FASDs; and ethical, legal, and policy issues.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, CD-ROMs, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prenatal addiction, Prenatal care, Professional education, Resources for professionals, Screening, Substance abusing pregnant women

Cardone I, Gilkerson L, Wechsler N. 2008. Teenagers and their babies: A perinatal home visitor's guide. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 163 pp.

Annotation: This book provides home visitors with examples on how to help expectant and new adolescent parents build deep and enduring bonds of attachment with their baby. Methods and strategies based on Community-Based Family Administered Neonatal Activities are discussed in a step-by-step review of how to implement a research-validated, structured intervention plan. Examples from six prenatal and one postnatal home visits describe techniques and activities designed to help build the strong mother-child relationships that prevent child abuse and strengthen the self-confidence and competence of young families. The appendices include resources on pregnancy and newborn infants , as well as information on fetal movement and newborn behavior, hearing, behavioral states, touch, smell and taste, vision, and a postnatal home visiting guide.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $29.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-934019-16-0.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Early intervention services, Fetal development, Home visiting, Mother child relations, Newborn infants, Pregnancy, Pregnant adolescents, Training materials

National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program. 2008. Fetal and infant mortality review manual: A guide for communities. (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review Program, 169 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides communities interested in developing a new Fetal and Infant Mortality Review (FIMR) Program, or continuing an existing FIMR program, with a step-by-step guide for implementing FIMR and making systems change happen for women, infants, and familles through FIMR. Contents include a description of the FIMR process, laying the groundwork, building community support and collaboration, abstracting medical records and conducting the home interview, basic team building and group process concepts for FIMR programs, the role of the case review team, the role of the community action team, taking stock of the FIMR process, and other maternal and child case review and related processes and the opportunities for collaboration. Standard definitions for reporting selected perinatal health statistics, and a glossary of terms, diagnoses and procedures is also included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Fetal-Infant Mortality Review Program, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, S.W.***DEFUNCT***, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 863-2587 E-mail: nfimr@acog.org Web Site: http://www.nfimr.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child death review, Collaboration, Fetal death, Infant death review, Infant mortality, Investigations, Manuals, Neonatal death, Program development, Surveillance

U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2006. Partnership to Prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Public education program manual. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 118 pp., plus 2 CD-ROMs.

Annotation: The print and CD editions of this program manual contain pretested research-based plans, strategies, and communications tools to develop public awareness about the dangers of alcohol consumption to the developing fetus. Chapter contents include partnership mobilization and program planning, provider involvement, materials dissemination, program evaluation, and pilot program descriptions. Appendices include materials and images, a glossary of terms, contact information, and references. The CD edition also provides four case studies that describe how the program was implemented and adapted by four pilot communities; links directly to Web-based resources; and provides PDF files of the communications tools. The CD supplement provides production source sfiles for the communications tools to allow graphic designers and commercial printers to create additional materials.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: HHS Pub. No. SMA-4013.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, CD-ROMs, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Pregnant women, Program development, Public awareness materials, Spanish language materials, Training materials

Clear the Air. [2005]. Mercury and the developing brain. Washington, DC: Clear the Air, 18 pp.

Annotation: This paper explains the sources of mercury in the environment and how people are exposed. It describes physical changes that occur in the developing brain due to mercury exposure during pregnancy and how these changes later translate into learning difficulties in school. Endnotes are provided.

Contact: Clear the Air, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Fifth Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 887-1715 Fax: (202) 887-8877 E-mail: info@cleartheair.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Brain damage, Child health, Environmental exposure, Fetal development, Hazardous materials, Infant development, Learning disabilities

Harris AC. 2005. The pregnancy journal: A day-to-day guide to a healthy and happy pregnancy. (Rev. ed.). San Francisco, CA: Chronicle Books, 205 pp.

Annotation: This spiral-bound diary for expectant parents provides helpful tips, information on baby's development, and blank space for notes during days of the nine-month cycle of pregnancy. It includes guidelines on healthy eating and lifestyle choices; describes common symptoms of pregnancy during each stage of development; and asks the expectant mother how she is feeling in terms of her mood, energy, and appetite. It also provides tips for expectant mothers who are past full term; provides space for documenting details about labor and delivery; and encourages new parents to write down details about their newborn infant. Simple illustrations and inspirational quotations about children and parenting are provided throughout.

Contact: Chronicle Books, Web Site: http://www.chroniclebooks.com/ $19.95, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: , Fetal development, Personal narratives, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Self care

Creasey RK, Resnik R. 2004. Maternal-fetal medicine: Principles and practice. (5th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: W. B. Saunders Company, 1362 pp.

Annotation: This textbook provides reference material in both the clinical and basic sciences in maternal-fetal medicine. The text is divided into three parts: early fetal development and the environment; fetal diagnostic and treatment modalities; and maternal and fetal pathophysiology. Normal and abnormal growth and development of the fetus, normal and abnormal labor and delivery, problems of pregnancy and problems of neonates are covered.

Contact: Elsevier, Health Sciences Division, 1600 John F. Kennedy Boulevard, Suite 1800, Philadelphia, PA 19103-2822, Telephone: (215) 239-3900 Fax: (215) 239-3990 Web Site: http://www.us.elsevierhealth.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Fetal development, Medical reference books, Newborn infants, Pregnancy, Prenatal diagnosis, Textbooks

Baldwin S. 2004. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Florida resource guide [rev. ed.]. Tallahassee, FL: Florida Department of Health, Florida Department of Children and Families, and Florida State University Center for Prevention and Early Intervention Policy, 68 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide provides information to help families and health professionals understand fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Section 1 defines FAS and other alcohol-related effects and explains the latest terminology. Section 2 explains how and when alcohol consumption affects fetal development. Section 3 includes 10 facts about FAS pertaining to prevalence, causes, and common myths. Section 4 highlights two diagnostic tools used to identify individuals with FAS. Section 5 describes the effects of FASD and provides cognitive, behavioral, educational, and health care intervention strategies for those working with individuals with FASD and compares several screening instruments currently used to identify women at risk for prenatal alcohol consumption. The resource section provides a list of FASD resources.

Contact: SAMHSA Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence, 2101 Gaither Road, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (866) 786-7327 E-mail: patricia.getty@samhsa.hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.fasdcenter.samhsa.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Diagnosis, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Genetic screening, Neonatal screening, Pregnancy, Primary care, Risk factors, Screening tests

Evans L, Jewett T, Powell C, Thompson Smith B. 2004. Fetal alcohol syndrome: A parents guide to caring for a child diagnosed with FAS. Winston-Salem, NC: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, 37 pp.

Annotation: This book, which is geared toward parents who have a child with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or with brain damage due to alcohol exposure, provides information about FAS. The book provides an overview of FAS; describes how FAS may affect infants, children, and adolescents during different developmental periods; discusses how to care for and advocate for a child with FAS; discusses issues associated with school for children with FAS; and provides resources.

Contact: Organization of Teratology Information Specialists, 5034A Thoroughbred Lane, Brentwood, TN 37027, Telephone: (866) 626-6847 Secondary Telephone: (615) 649-3087 E-mail: ngreer@otispregnancy.org Web Site: http://otispregnancy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Advocacy, Child development, Consumer education materials, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Infant development, School adjustment

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.