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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

Fond M, Kendall-Taylor N, Volmert A, Pineau MG, L’Hôte E. 2017. Seeing the spectrum: Mapping the gaps between expert and public understandings of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder in Manitoba. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute, 49 pp.

Annotation: This report presents an empirically-based framing strategy for communicating about fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Contents include a set of principles reflecting expert understanding of what fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is, how alcohol affects fetal development, why women consume alcohol while pregnant, what the effects of FASD are, and how FASD can be prevented and addressed. The report also describes shared but implicit understandings, assumptions, and patterns of reasoning that shape how the public thinks about FASD, points at which expert and public understandings overlap and diverge, and key challenges in communicating about FASD. Recommendations are included.

Contact: FrameWorks Institute, 1333 H Street, N.W., Suite 700 West, Washington, DC 20005, E-mail: info@FrameWorksInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.FrameWorksInstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol consumption attitudes, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Beliefs, Communication, Culturally competent services, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prevention services, Research, Trauma care

American College of Nurse-Midwives and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [2015]. Alcohol and pregnancy: Tips on why and how to stop drinking. Silver Spring, MD: American College of Nurse-Midwives, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource for pregnant women provides information about drinking alcohol during pregnancy and the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome disorders (FASDs). Topics include some of the behavioral and intellectual disabilities of people with FASDs, what women can do to help themselves stop drinking alcohol, and related organizational resources.

Contact: American College of Nurse-Midwives, 8403 Colesville Road, Suite 1550, Silver Spring, MD 20910, Telephone: (240) 485-1800 Secondary Telephone: (888) MID-WIFE (643-9433) Fax: (240) 485-1818 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.midwife.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Educational materials, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Pregnant women, Prevention, Substance use

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence. 2014. Tools for success: Working with youth with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in the juvenile justice system (rev.). Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence, 1 v.

Annotation: These modules for individuals working with youth in the juvenile justice system provide information and resources on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). Contents include six modules on topics such as FASD basics; behaviors; screening, assessment, and diagnosis; collaborating effectively; and intervention services. Each module ends with a 10-question quiz.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Center for Excellence, 2101 Gaither Road, Suite 600, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (866)786-7327 E-mail: fasdcenter1@ngc.com Web Site: http://www.fascenter.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Continuing education, Criminal justice system, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Intervention, Resources for professionals, Training, Youth

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2013. Addressing fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD): A review of the literature. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1 v.

Annotation: This literature review covers the prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, cost of care, screening women at risk, diagnostics, ARND (alcohol related neurodevelopmental disorder) consensus statement, teratogenic science and the brain, birth outcomes, cognitive and behavioral impact, co-occurrence, efficacy of intervention, research, and regulation and federal legislation.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Literature reviews, Therapeutics

National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 2010. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (upd. ed.). [Rockville, Md]: National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The fact sheet discusses progress in understanding, preventing, and treating the problem since alcohol's ability to cause birth defects was first recognized over three decades ago. Steps for health professionals and women who are pregnant or who are considering becoming pregnant to take to prevent FASD are provided. Research geared toward better preventing and treating FASD in the future is also discussed.

Contact: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, , 5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, Telephone: (301) 443-3860 Fax: (301) 780-1726 E-mail: NIAAAweb-r@exchange.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Birth injuries, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Infant health, Prevention, Reproductive heath, Research, Treatment, Trends

Barry KL, Caetano R, Chang G, DeJoseph MC, Miller LA, O'Connor MJ, Olson, HC, Floyd RL, Weber MK, DeStefano F, Dolina S, Leeks K. 2009. Reducing alcohol-exposed pregnancies: A Report of the National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect. Atlanta, GA: National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report identifies community-level fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) interventions and policies that can prevent fetal alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEDs) and reduce the prevalence of physical, mental, behavioral, and learning disabilities due to prenatal alcohol exposure. Topics also include an epidemiological overview, screening for women at risk, current evidence, prevention interventions, and recommendations and future research directions.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol, Early intervention, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention, Screening, Substance abusing pregnant women

Olson HC, Ohlemiller MM, O'Connor MJ, Brown CW, Morris CA, Damus K. 2009. A call to action: Advancing essential services and research on fetal alcohol spectrum disorders—A report of the National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect. Atlanta, GA: National Task Force on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Effect, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights ten recommendations to improve and expand efforts regarding early identification, diagnostic services, and quality research on interventions for individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) and their families. Also included are action steps, accomplishments of the Task Force, an overview of the strategic plan, an overview of the Center for Excellence, and information about the Interagency Coordinating Committee on fetal alcohol syndrome.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Early intervention, Federal initiatives, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, MCH research, Prevention, Strategic plans, Substance abusing pregnant women

FASD Regional Training Centers, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. [2008]. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders: Competency-based curriculum development guide for medical and allied health education and practice. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, ca. 280 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This purpose of this curriculum development guide is to enhance the knowledge and skills of health care providers to recognize and prevent fetal alcohol spectrum (FAS) disorders by aiding in the development of educational programs and materials. The guide is organized by three types of learning outcomes: competencies, learning goals, and learning objectives, allowing educators or trainers to select goals and objectives appropriate for participants' learning needs and skill levels, along with university or organization criteria. Chapter contents include seven competency topics: foundation; screening and brief interventions; models of addiction; biological effects of alcohol on the fetus; screening, diagnosis, and assessment of FAS; treatment across the lifespan for persons with FASDs; and ethical, legal, and policy issues.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, CD-ROMs, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Fetal development, Prenatal addiction, Prenatal care, Professional education, Resources for professionals, Screening, Substance abusing pregnant women

Minnesota Department of Health, Maternal Child Health - Community and Family Health. 2007. Smart Women Smart Choices: iParty Smarter.com. St. Paul, MN: Maternal Child Health - Community and Family Health, Minnesota Department of Health,

Annotation: This Web site is a free self-guided change program designed for Minnesota women between the ages of 19 and 24 who are sexually active and drink alcohol, even at moderate levels or just once in a while, or may be concerned about the effects of alcohol on their lives. Women ages 25-45 may also participate. Information is provided on the goals of the program, what women will get out of the program, how the program works, and program steps. Also discussed is how drinking contributes to risky behaviors and fetal alcohol syndrome.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Division of Community and Family Health, MN Telephone: (651) 201-3589 E-mail: health.cfhcommunications@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/cfh Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcoholic beverages, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Minnesota, Pregnant women, Risk taking, Self help programs, State programs, Women, Young women

U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2006. Partnership to Prevent Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders: Public education program manual. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 118 pp., plus 2 CD-ROMs.

Annotation: The print and CD editions of this program manual contain pretested research-based plans, strategies, and communications tools to develop public awareness about the dangers of alcohol consumption to the developing fetus. Chapter contents include partnership mobilization and program planning, provider involvement, materials dissemination, program evaluation, and pilot program descriptions. Appendices include materials and images, a glossary of terms, contact information, and references. The CD edition also provides four case studies that describe how the program was implemented and adapted by four pilot communities; links directly to Web-based resources; and provides PDF files of the communications tools. The CD supplement provides production source sfiles for the communications tools to allow graphic designers and commercial printers to create additional materials.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: HHS Pub. No. SMA-4013.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, CD-ROMs, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Pregnant women, Program development, Public awareness materials, Spanish language materials, Training materials

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. 2004. Better safe than sorry: Preventing a tragedy. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism,

Annotation: This online curriculum is designed to promote education about alcohol-related birth defects and their prevention. The curriculum is aimed at middle and high school students and is flexible with respect to the amount of class time available for the curriculum. Classroom activities include viewing a 15-minute videotape, conducting a hands-on experiment, playing games, and other activities. The subject matter may be integrated into science, health, language arts, or math classes, and the curriculum meets the National Science Education Standards for Science Content Standards. The curriculum includes teacher preparation materials in the form of fact sheets, videotapes, transparencies, and a PowerPoint presentation with Internet links to informational sites. Worksheets and suggestions for topics of discussion are included, as well.

Contact: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, , 5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, Telephone: (301) 443-3860 Fax: (301) 780-1726 E-mail: NIAAAweb-r@exchange.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: . Pregnancy, Congenital abnormalities, Curricula, Educational materials, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Prevention

Evans L, Jewett T, Powell C, Thompson Smith B. 2004. Fetal alcohol syndrome: A parents guide to caring for a child diagnosed with FAS. Winston-Salem, NC: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, 37 pp.

Annotation: This book, which is geared toward parents who have a child with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) or with brain damage due to alcohol exposure, provides information about FAS. The book provides an overview of FAS; describes how FAS may affect infants, children, and adolescents during different developmental periods; discusses how to care for and advocate for a child with FAS; discusses issues associated with school for children with FAS; and provides resources.

Contact: Organization of Teratology Information Specialists, 5034A Thoroughbred Lane, Brentwood, TN 37027, Telephone: (866) 626-6847 Secondary Telephone: (615) 649-3087 E-mail: ngreer@otispregnancy.org Web Site: http://otispregnancy.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Advocacy, Child development, Consumer education materials, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Infant development, School adjustment

Hennepin County Community Health Department. 2002. Healthy babies: The provider's role in fetal alcohol syndrome prevention. Minneapolis, MN: Hennepin County Community Health Department, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes and analyzes information from a study conducted to determine whether health professionals in Hennepin County, Minnesota, discuss alcohol use with women of childbearing age. The report includes the following sections: (1) a model for clinical prevention and intervention, (2) phase one: provider prenatal alcohol screening survey, (3) phase two: provider focus group research, (3) summary, and (4) a call to action. A reference list is also included. Four appendices include the prenatal alcohol screening survey, selected survey results, coding schemes for variables in multiple regression analyses, and a prenatal care provider focus group discussion guide.

Contact: Hennepin County Human Services and Public Health Department, 525 Portland Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55415, Telephone: (612) 348-4111 E-mail: HSPH.FrontDoor.Screening@co.hennepin.mn.us Web Site: http://hennepin.us/hsphd Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Focus groups, Health personnel, Intervention, Minnesota, Pregnancy, Questionnaires, Research, Substance abusing pregnant women, Surveys

Howard JM, Martin SE, Mail PD, Hilton ME, Taylor ED. 1996. Women and alcohol: Issues for prevention research. Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 361 pp. (Research monograph 32)

Annotation: This book addresses alcohol use and abuse among women. The chapters discuss patterns and trends in women's drinking, the inheritance of alcoholism, research issues in the prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome and alcohol-related birth defects, gender differences in alcohol involvement in children and adolescents, parenting interventions to prevent alcohol and other drug use among children, women's drinking practices and problems from a life span perspective, drinking and driving among women, women's alcohol use and their violent victimization, occupational culture and drinking in women, the effects of alcoholism on the labor market, alcohol consumption and female sexuality, and future directions for psychosocial and prevention research on women and alcohol.

Contact: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, , 5635 Fishers Lane, MSC 9304, Bethesda, MD 20892-9304, Telephone: (301) 443-3860 Fax: (301) 780-1726 E-mail: NIAAAweb-r@exchange.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: NIH 96-3817.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Alcoholism, Congenital abnormalities, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Impaired driving, Personnel, Prevention, Research, Sexuality, Women

AIMS Media. 1992. Alcohol and pregnancy: Fetal alcohol syndrome and fetal alcohol effects. Chatsworth, CA: AIMS Media, 1 videotape (20 minutes), 1 flyer (1 p.).

Annotation: This videotape is intended to be a tool for the prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome/fetal alcohol effects. It covers physical, mental, and behavioral abnormalities of children who have fetal alcohol syndrome or fetal alcohol effects. It briefly covers ways in which alcohol causes such abnormalities; and, at the end, strongly advises against alcohol intake during pregnancy. It includes numerous interviews and photographs of affected children that serve to illustrate the range and extent of abnormalities. For some of these, the caregiver (usually accompanied by the child) or affected child describes the child's problems. Two women tell about the adverse effects of their drinking during pregnancy; both are African American. After the first one admits that she didn't know that what she was doing was harmful, a warning label is displayed with audio indicating that information about the danger is right on the label of all alcoholic beverages. Other than advice to say 'No' to alcohol for the sake of the baby, methods of dealing with an alcohol problem are not addressed. The videotape is intended for high school to adult audiences.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Audiovisual materials, Fetal alcohol effects, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Personal narratives, Videotapes

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration, Office for Substance Abuse Prevention. 1992. Identifying the needs of drug-affected children: Public policy issues. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Substance Abuse Prevention, 168 pp. (OSAP prevention monograph; 11)

Annotation: This monograph contains the papers presented at the Issue Forum on Drug-Exposed Children Ages 2 to 5 held in November, 1990. The forum was held to determine the needs of drug-exposed children between the ages 2 to 5, and to develop intervention strategies. The forum focused on their special physical and psychological needs that need attention prior to their entering the public school system. Participants brought together expertise from the medical, child welfare, psychosocial, developmental, legal, and political and advocacy disciplines; and the topics considered also ranged across these disciplines. A list of the participants and the schedule from the forum are included.

Keywords: Child development, Drug affected children, Drug affected children, Educational factors, Fetal alcohol effects, Health services, Public policy, Social consequences

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.