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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (21 total).

Women Deliver. 2014. Invest in girls and women: Everybody wins–The path ahead to sustainable development. New York, NY: Women Deliver, 19 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit presents specific tasks and goals related to maternal and newborn health, family planning and reproductive health, women's health, education, and equality, with the aim of providing global partners with a course of action to advocate for the health and well-being of girls and women. Contents include infographics, data points, and key messages to make the case for investing in girls and women.

Contact: Women Deliver, 584 Broadway, Suite 306, New York, NY 10012, Telephone: (646) 695-9100 Fax: (646) 695-9145 E-mail: info@womendeliver.org Web Site: http://www.womendeliver.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Advocacy, Child health, Data, Education, Family planning, Female children, Goals, International health, Maternal health, Reproductive health, Women's health

White House Council for Women and Girls. 2014. Women and girls of color: Addressing challenges and expanding opportunity. [Washington, DC]: White House Council for Women and Girls, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights federal and other policies, programs, and initiatives that impact women and girls of color in the United States. Topics include health disparities, HIV/AIDS, maternal and child health, nutrition and physical activity, research, sexual and reproductive health, adolescent pregnancy, and workplace safety. Barriers and disparities related to education, economic security, violence, and criminal and juvenile justice are also addressed.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Adolescent females, Barriers, Female children, Initiatives, Policy development, Public policy, Women

Bell K, Terzian MA, Moore KA. 2012. What works for female children and adolescents: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 20 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This research brief examines programs and strategies that work and that do not work for improving health and mental health outcomes for females. A companion brief does the same for males. The brief synthesizes findings from 106 random assignment intent-to-treat evaluations of social interventions that targeted female children, adolescents, and young adults or co-ed interventions that provide separate data for the female subgroup. The brief introduces the problem and discusses interventions that address the following issues: academic achievement, delinquency, mental health, physical health and nutrition, reproductive health and sexuality, self-sufficiency, substance use.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Depression, Female adolescents, Female children, Health, Intervention, Mental health, Nutrition, Programs, Reproductive health, Research, Sexuality, Substance abuse, Young adults

Carbaugh A. 2011. The U.S. Global Health Initiative’s Women, Girls, and Gender Equality Principle: A roundtable discussion. Menlo Park, CA: J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the discussion of a roundtable that took place at the Kaiser Family Foundation in November 2010. The roundtable examined the women, girls, and gender-equality principle of the U.S. Global Health Initiative (GHI). The report introduces the roundtable and presents the principle behind the GHI, discusses the guidance, and presents roundtable key issues.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Female adolescents, Female children, Gender discrimination, Initiatives, International health, Women

National Institute of Mental Health. 2011. Eating disorders. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Mental Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information about eating disorders. The document explains what eating disorders are; discusses the different types of eating disorders including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder; explains how eating disorders are treated, and discusses how males are affected and what is being done to better understand and treat eating disorders.

Contact: National Institute of Mental Health, 6001 Executive Boulevard, Bethesda, MD 20892-9663, Telephone: (866) 615-6464 Secondary Telephone: (301) 443-8431 Fax: (301) 443-4279 E-mail: nimhinfo@nih.gov Web Site: http://www.nimh.nih.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 11-4901.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent males, Anorexia nervosa, Bulimia, Child behavior, Eating disorders, Female children, Male children, Treatment

Bertrand M, Pan J. 2011. The trouble with boys: Social influences and the gender gap in disruptive behavior. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 62 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17541)

Annotation: This paper explores the importance of the home and school environments in explaining the gender gap in disruptive behavior. The authors discuss data used, what drives the gender gap in non-cognitive skills, and why boys raised by single mothers are particularly at risk.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Families, Female children, Income factors, Low income groups, Male children, Mental health, Parent child relations, Research, School role, Single mothers

Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health. [2010]. Strategic plan: 2011-2015. [Phoenix, AZ]: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 3 pp.

Annotation: This strategic plan for 2011-2015 discusses overarching goals and priorities for the Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health. For each priority, strategies and performance measures are described.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, Bureau of Women's and Children's Health, 150 N. 18th Ave., Suite 320, Phoenix, AZ 85007, Telephone: (602) 364-1400 Fax: (602) 364- 1495 E-mail: sjolans@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/phs/owch/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents with special health care needs, Arizona, Child health, Children with special health care needs, Female adolescents, Health services, Hearing disorders, Hearing screening, Hearing tests, Injury prevention, Obesity, Pregnancy, Prevention, Reproductive health, Transition to independent living, Women's health

Fuentes L, Bayetti Flores V, Gonzalez-Rojas J. 2010. Removing stigma: Towards a complete understanding of young Latinas' sexual health. New York, NY: National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews recent research on adolescent sexuality and reproductive health, sets forth a reproductive justice framework for advancing the sexual health of Latina adolescents, and describes policy approaches that make healthy decisions possible and rewarding, so Latinas and all women can have healthy adolescent years, avoid pregnancy and birth when they want to, and have healthy pregnancies and children when and if they choose to become mothers.

Contact: National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, 50 Broad Street, Suite 1825, New York, NY 10004, Telephone: (212) 422-2553 Fax: (212) 422-2556 E-mail: NLIRH@LatinaInstitute.org Web Site: http://www.latinainstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Female children, Hispanic Americans, Pregnancy prevention, Reproductive health, Sexual health, Young women

Concept Systems, Inc. 2010. A summit for action: The health of women and girls beyond 2010--Summary of discussion and recommendations. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Coordinating Committee on Women's Health, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report offers a summary of the July 2010 summit of government, academia, health services, consumers, research, and advocacy groups to identify opportunities and strategies to advance the status of the health of women and girls beyond 2010. Priorities in nine areas are discussed: eliminate access barrier; deliver prevention; mobilize knowledge for health; teach healthy lifestyle skills; promote wellness; marshal collective action; communicate informed policies; conduct, translate, and apply research; and integrate health systems and services. Additional topics include workforce, funding and resources, and health care reform.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Task forces, Conferences, Female children, Heath planning, Needs assessment, Strategic plans, Women, Women's health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. [2009]. Action steps for improving women's mental health. Washington, DC: Office on Women's Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report proposes a series of action steps that can be taken to promote change and support progress to improve the mental and overall health of women and girls. The action steps use a public health approach that addresses the mental health needs and concerns of women and girls.A rationale for the action steps is provided, along with a description of the methodology and objectives. Lists of programs and tools for adults and youth are included.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Community programs, Diagnosis, Female children, Mental health, Prevention, Treatment, Women's health

Altarum Institute. 2009. Bodyworks evaluation final report. [Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This evaluation final report provides information about Bodyworks, a program designed to help parents and caregivers of girls ages 8-17 improve family eating and physical activity habits. The program focuses on parents as role models and provides them with hands-on tools to make small, specific changes to prevent obesity and help maintain a healthy weight. The evaluation provides background information and discusses the purpose of the program and discusses the evaluation purpose and design, the process evaluation, outcomes for parents and caregivers and for girls.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Child behavior, Child health, Families, Female children, Nutrition, Obesity, Parents, Physical activity, Prevention, Program evaluation, Programs, Weight loss, Weight management

Kay JF, Jackson A. 2008. Sex, lies and stereotypes: How abstinence-only programs harm women and girls. New York, NY: Legal Momentum, 62 pp.

Annotation: This report explores issues from a roundtable meeting of experts from a range of disciplines to discuss abstinence-only programs and their particular impact on women and girls. In addition, broader academic research and original research contributed to the report. Topics include reviews of abstinence-only funding and history; domestic abstinence-only programs in practice; specific harm to women and girls, such as reinforcing stereotypes, increasing health risks, and violating human rights; how exporting the abstinence-only agenda fails women and girls internationally; and issues in looking ahead.

Contact: Legal Momentum, 395 Hudson Street, New York, NY 10014, Telephone: (212) 925-6635 Web Site: http://www.legalmomentum.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Abstinence, Federal initiatives, Female children, Reproductive health, Sexual behavior, Sexual health, Sexuality education, Women's health, Women's rights

American Psychological Association, Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls. 2007. Report of the APA Task Force on the Sexualization of Girls. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report examines and summarizes psychological theory, research, and clinical experience addressing the sexualization of girls. The report defines sexualization and addresses how the prevalence and effects of sexualization may vary among girls from different ethnic, socioeconomic, religious, and family backgrounds, as well as among girls of different sexual orientations. The authors discuss (1) examples of sexualization in society and in cultural institutions, as well as interpersonally and intrapsychically; (2) evidence suggesting that sexualization has negative consequences for girls and for the rest of society; and (3) positive alternatives that may help counteract the influence of sexualization. Recommendations for research, practice, education, training, policy, and public awareness are presented. The report concludes with a list of references and media-literacy resources.

Contact: American Psychological Association, 750 First Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20002-4242, Telephone: (202) 336-5500 Secondary Telephone: (800) 374-2721 Fax: (202) 336-6069 E-mail: mis@apa.org Web Site: http://www.apa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Ethnic factors, Female children, Income factors, Mass media, Sexual identity, Sexuality

Steingraber S. 2007. The falling age of puberty in U.S. girls: What we know, what we need to know. San Francisco, CA: Breast Cancer Fund, 72 pp.

Annotation: This report examines five topics related to early puberty in U.S. females. Part 1 looks at the harmful impacts of early puberty, including a potential link to breast cancer. Part 2 explores time trends in puberty both in the United States and abroad. Part 3 examines the regulation of puberty. Part 4 looks at the insights offered by evolutionary biology. Party 5 explores the various possible causes for the declining age of puberty in U.S. girls. Part 6 proposes recommendations for research and action based on current evidence.

Contact: Breast Cancer Fund, 1388 Sutter Street, Suite 400, San Francisco, CA 94109, Telephone: (866) 760-TBCF Secondary Telephone: (415) 346-8223 Web Site: http://www.BreastCancerFund.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Breast cancer, Breastfeeding, Female children, Obesity, Precocious puberty, Prematurity, Research, Television, Trends

Sen G, Ostlin, P, George A. 2007. Unequal, unfair, ineffective and inefficient: Gender inequity in health—Why it exists and how we can change it. Bangalore, India: Indian Institute of Management Bangalore; Stockholm, Sweden: Karolinska Institutet , 127 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on gender inequities in health and how these inequities affect girls and women, as well as men. The report discusses the evidence base; gender as a key determinant of health; what we know about gendered structural determinants; norms, values, and practices; differences in exposure and vulnerability; the politics of the health care system; health research; and the way forward.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Female adolescents, Female children, Health care systems, International health, Men's health, Research, Women's health

Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport. 2007. Developing physically active girls: An evidence-based multidisciplinary approach. Minneapolis, MN: Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, 108 pp. (2007 Tucker Center research report)

Annotation: This report discusses the physiological, psychological, and sociological dimensions and impact of physical activity in the lives of young girls. It summarizes an original report addressing the same topic created 10 years prior to this, and provides an overview of the research and implications of this report's key findings. The report concludes with recommendations for best practices.

Contact: Tucker Center for Research on Girls and Women in Sport, University of Minnesota, 203 Cooke Hall, 1900 University Avenue, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455, Telephone: (612) 625-7327 E-mail: info@tuckercenter.org Web Site: http://education.umn.edu/tuckercenter/default.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Female children, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Recreation

Schoenberg J, Salmond K, Fleshman P. 2006. The new normal?: What girls say about healthy living . New York, NY: Girl Scouts of the USA, 116 pp., exec. summ. (36 pp.).

Annotation: This report describes a study that examined both attitudinal and behavioral issues that inform girls' health and emotial well-being (e.g., body image, diet, exercise, sources of health-related information). The report, which includes an executive summary, discusses the following research findings: (1) incidence of overweight in the sample, (2) aspiring to be normal healthy, (3) girls and body image, (4) tension between awareness and behavior, (5) girls and physical activity, (6) the influential role of mothers, and (7) communicating with girls. The report also includes conclusions and recommendations, references and resources, an online survey for girls and adolescents and one for parents, a focus group discussion guide, and endnotes. The executive summary is also available in Spanish.

Contact: Girl Scouts of the USA, 420 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10018-2798, Telephone: (800) 478-7248 Secondary Telephone: (212) 852-8000 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.girlscouts.org executive summary available from the website; full report available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent children, Adolescent health, Body image, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child health, Communication, Female adolescents, Mothers, Obesity, Physical activity, Spanish language materials

Schoenberg J, Salmond K, Fleshman P. 2004. Weighing in: Helping girls be healthy today, healthy tomorrow. New York, NY: Girl Scout Research Institute, 33 pp. (Research review)

Annotation: This report identifies key research trends for children and adolescents in the areas of health, nutrition, and physical activity as they relate to child obesity and weight issues. The report also focuses on gender and cultural issues in the research, especially with regard to girls' body image. The main social environments in which girls participate are explored, as is the role of media and marketing. Conclusions and next steps, references, and resources are included.

Contact: Girl Scouts of the USA, 420 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10018-2798, Telephone: (800) 478-7248 Secondary Telephone: (212) 852-8000 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.girlscouts.org $3.50, plus shipping and handling; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Adolescent health, Body image, Child health, Cultural factors, Female children, Marketing, Mass media, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Research, Trends

Mullin-Rindler N. 2003. Relational aggression and bullying: It's more than just a girl thing. Wellesley, MA: Wellesley Centers for Women, 25 pp. (Working papers; no. 408)

Annotation: This paper looks at some recent assumptions that have been made about girls and relational aggression. The paper refutes both the premise that aggression among girls is a new phenomenon and the notion that relational aggression is unique to girls. In addition, the paper offers concrete strategies based in research and developmentally appropriate practice that can be used to improve aspects of school climate that perpetuate aggression and reduce its prevalence in elementary and middle schools.

Contact: Wellesley Centers for Women, Wellesley College, 106 Central Street, Wellesley, MA 02481, Telephone: (781) 283-2500 Fax: (781) 283-2504 E-mail: wcw@wellesley.edu Web Site: http://www.wcwonline.org $10.00, plus shipping and handling of $4.00.

Keywords: Adolescents, Aggression, Bullying, Children, Elementary school, Females, Interpersonal relations, Middle school, Relationships, Research

Schoenberg J, Riggins T, Salmond K. 2003. Feeling safe: What girls say. [New York, NY]: Girl Scouts of the USA, 124 pp., exec. summ. (23 pp.).

Annotation: This report addresses question about what safety means to girls, what it takes to make them feel safe, and why feeling safe matters. These questions include (1) how do girls define safety?, (2) what do girls consider safe and unsafe situations?, (3) how does feeling unsafe impact quality of life issues?, and (4) what strategies do girls use to cope with physically and emotionally unsafe situations? The report is divided into the following sections: (1) defining safety, (2) experiencing safety, (3) relationships, trust, and safety, (4) safety and everyday functioning, (5) group experiences, and (6) coping, resources, and solutions. Implications of the information are also discussed. Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report. The report incudes three appendices: (1) methodology, (2) moderator's guide and homework assignment, and (3) questionnaire. References and resources are included, as well.

Contact: Girl Scouts of the USA, 420 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10018-2798, Telephone: (800) 478-7248 Secondary Telephone: (212) 852-8000 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.girlscouts.org Summary available from the website; contact publisher for full report.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent females, Adolescent mental health, Child attitudes, Child mental health, Female children, Relationships, Safety, Trust

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.