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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

Sherman B. n.d.. Home-Based Support Services for Chronically Ill Children and Their Families [Final report]. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, 35 pp.

Annotation: This project sought to demonstrate that a system of reimbursable, cost-effective, home-based support services can be implemented for families with chronically ill children. The project objectives were to facilitate the provision of home-based care for chronically ill children through the following activities: (1) Developing a regional network of medically skilled respite providers; (2) establishing self-help mutual support groups for chronically ill children and their parents and siblings; (3) training professionals, paraprofessionals, and volunteers; and (4) disseminating project findings and recommendations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158699.

Keywords: Arthritis, Asthma, Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Congenital Heart Disease, Cystic Fibrosis, Families, Feeding Disorders, Hemophilia, Home-Based Health Care, Kidney Disease, Leukemia, Low income groups, Muscular Dystrophy, Nurses, Respiratory Technologies, Respite Care, Sick Kids (Need) Involved People (SKIP), Sickle Cell Disease, Support Groups, Tay-Sachs Disease, Ventilator Dependence

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Infant Health Program. 2012. Maternal and infant health priorities and opportunities in home visiting. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 12 pp.

Annotation: This resource is a printout of presentation slides that provide information about maternal and infant health priorities and opportunities in home visiting. The presentation discusses opportunities for preventing premature birth. obesity, and maternal depression in the context of home visiting, Best practices for safe sleep, infant illness care, and infant feeding problems are also discussed.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Depression, Feeding disorders, Health care, Home visiting, Infant feeding, Infant health, Mental health, Obesity, Postpartum depression, Preterm birth, Prevention, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position, Women's health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2005. Bodywise handbook: Eating disorders information for middle school personnel. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 21 pp.

Annotation: This handbook provides information specifically directed to adults who work with students in grades 5-7 addressing the signs and symptoms of eating disorders, steps to take when concerned about students, and ways to create a school environment that discourages disordered eating. It also discusses how eating disorders and disordered eating impact learning, mental and physical health issues, the importance of early detection, and how members of all ethnic and cultural groups are vulnerable. Definitions of conditions are provided and teaching materials included.

Contact: National Women's Health Information Center, 8270 Willow Oaks Corporate Drive, Fairfax, VA 22031, Telephone: (800) 994-9662 Secondary Telephone: (888) 220-5446 Fax: (703) 560-6598 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Anorexia nervosa, Behavior disorders, Bulimia, Eating disorders, Educational materials, Feeding disorders, Middle schools

Singer L. 2003. Psychosocial sequelae of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and very low birthweight: Phase 2—Final report. Cleveland, OH: Case Western Reserve University, Department of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a study focusing on the long-term developmental and family sequelae outcomes of very low birth weight children with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). It addresses whether infants with BPD would exhibit more developmental problems, using standard measures of growth, intellect, motor, and language development; whether parents would show higher degrees of depressive symptoms and stress; and whether infants would show more deviant and maladaptive feeding behavior. Report sections include the nature, purpose, scope, and methods of the research problem; a review of the literature; an outline of the study design and methods; a presentation of findings; and a discussion of findings and recommendations for policy implications and further research. Also provided are a list of products developed and references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Family relations, Feeding disorders, Final reports, Low birthweight infants, MCH research, Prematurity

Story M, Stang J, eds. 2000. Nutrition and the pregnant adolescent: A practical reference guide. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Center for Leadership, Education, and Training in Maternal and Child Nutrition, 247 pp.

Annotation: This book focuses on clinical application of current knowledge on adolescent pregnancy emphasizing assessment, management, counseling approaches, and strategies to promote dietary change and adequate weight gain. It is written for health professionals and educators involved in the care of pregnant adolescents. Topics covered include adolescent development, nutritional needs and eating behavior, nutrition assessment, interviewing, counseling, prenatal education, and postpartum care.

Contact: University of Minnesota School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, West Bank Office Building, 1300 S. Second Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454-1015, Telephone: (612) 624-1818 Fax: (612) 624-0315 Contact E-mail: kosiak@epi.umn.edu Web Site: http://sph.umn.edu/epi Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHM035.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent pregnancy, Eating behaviors, Feeding disorders, Interviews, Nutrition, Nutrition assessment, Postpartum care, Pregnancy counseling, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant adolescents, Prenatal education

Kessler DB, Dawson P, eds. 1999. Failure to thrive and pediatric undernutrition: A transdisciplinary approach. Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company, 620 pp.

Annotation: This resource discusses assessment and intervention techniques, the medical and developmental consequences of pediatric undernutrition, interdisciplinary teamwork and service coordination, and nutrition and feeding issues from medical care and child development to community planning and advocacy. Also discussed are numerous difficulties associated with inadequate nutrition in children younger than age 3, including developmental delays, medical conditions that impair growth, and cognitive deficits. The book also addresses nonmedical issues including the feeding relationship, nutrition, cultural diversity, working with families, and infant mental health. Clinically related appendices provide scales for assessing childhood feeding disorders and emotional health, growth charts, diet records, and clinical questionnaires.

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-348-3.

Keywords: Assessment, Child development, Child mental health, Child nutrition, Children, Cognitive development, Cultural diversity, Early childhood development, Failure to thrive, Feeding, Growth charts, Infant nutrition, Interdisciplinary cooperation, Intervention, Nutrition disorders, Pediatrics, Questionnaires, Records, Service coordination

Academy for Educational Development, LINKAGES Project. 1999. Recommended feeding and dietary practices to improve infant and maternal nutrition. Washington, DC: LINKAGES Project, Academy for Educational Development, 28 pp.

Annotation: This report provides guidelines for feeding practices to improve the nutrition of infants, ages 0-6 months and 6-24 months, and also dietiary practices to improve the nutrition of adolescent girls and women of reproductive age. The document provides technical justification for the guidelines and also identifies and discusses determinants of nutritional status.

Contact: FHI 360 , 359 Blackwell Street, Suite 200, Durham, NC 27701, Telephone: (919) 544-7040 Fax: (919) 544-7261 E-mail: communicationsmail@aed.org Web Site: http://www.fhi360.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health status, Barriers, Breastfeeding, Delayed childbearing, Dietary guidelines, Family planning, Feeding, Infant nutrition, Intervention, Low birth weight, Maternal health, Maternal nutrition, Nutrition disorders, Physical activity, Premature infants, Prenatal nutrition

Porges S. 1998. Regulatory Disorders and Developmental Outcomes: [Final report]. College Park, MD: University of Maryland at College Park, 53 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the project was to identify during infancy the measurable precursors of severe behavioral and emotional disorders. The study recruited 80 infants with regulatory disorders and 80 normal peers (matched for socioeconomic status, minority group status, presence or absence of father in home, number of children in family, and parenting stress). The regulatory disordered infants and control infants were assessed at 9 months and followed at 24 and 36 months. A comprehensive battery was administered at each assessment point. Mothers completed questionnaires on child temperament, child behavior problems, parenting stress, and demographic information. At 36 months, children received an evaluation to assess behavioral and emotional difficulties. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB2000-106684.

Keywords: Affective Disorders, Behavior Disorders, Feeding Disorders, Infant Health Care, Infants, MCH Research, Preschool children, Regulatory Disorders, Research, Research, Sensory Impairments, Sleep Disorders, Toddlers

Horsley JW, Allen ER, Daniel PW. 1996. Nutrition management of school age children with special needs: A resource manual for school personnel, families, and health professionals = Nutrition management of handicapped and chronically ill school children: A resource manual for school personnel, families and health professionals. (2nd ed.). Richmond, VA: Virginia Department of Health and Virginia Department of Education, 93 pp.

Annotation: This manual, a product of an interagency project between the Virginia Departments of Health and Education, is a guide for parents and professionals on the management of nutrition problems of school children with special needs. It helps school personnel plan nutrition services for students who have special health needs or are chronically ill. The information included facilitates the management of special diets and the expansion of nutrition education in the school curriculum. It includes information on these topics: common nutrition problems and interventions during the school day; dietary considerations of specific conditions and related factors; and nutrition goals and objectives for the individualized education program. Dietary considerations and sources of information and/or nutrition education materials for the following conditions are discussed: cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, diabetes mellitus, Down syndrome, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, phenylketonuria, seizure disorders, spina bifida, constipation, feeding abnormalities, and tube feeding. Nine case studies are presented. The appendix includes information on lunch menu ideas for special diets, nutritious snacks, textural modifications, arthritis diet and drugs, complications of tube feeding, and PKU diet free foods. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHI113.

Keywords: Cerebral palsy, Children with special health care needs, Constipation, Cystic fibrosis, Diabetes mellitus, Down syndrome, Enteral nutrition, Epilepsy, Feeding disorders, Individualized education programs, Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, Nutrition, Phenylketonuria, School food services, Spina bifida

Singer L. 1995. Psychosocial sequelae of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and very low birthweight. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 6 pp. (Research roundtable summary; no. 9)

Annotation: This report summarizes a Maternal and Child Health Bureau funded project presented at a seminar June 27, 1995. The study focuses on the developmental and family sequelae of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and the medical and social complications of prematurity and very low birthweight. It addresses whether infants with BPD would exhibit more developmental problems, using standard measures of growth, intellect, motor, and language development; whether parents would show higher degrees of depressive symptoms and stress; and whether infants would show more deviant and maladaptive feeding behavior. The report ends with reaction to the project and a list of publications. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Photocopy available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia, Developmental disabilities, Families, Feeding disorders, Low birthweight infants, MCH research, Prematurity

American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health. 1988. Guidelines for health supervision II. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 159 pp.

Annotation: This manual presents selected approaches for pediatricians and other child health professionals in caring for children and families whose health and adaptation are thought to be in the normal range. This notebook incorporates biomedical, developmental, and psychosocial information. For each checkup, it suggests questions to ask the parent, factors to look for in examining the child, immunizations, and anticipatory guidance to offer the parents. Supplementary information is given on common issues including self-comforting behaviors, feeding behavior in infancy and early childhood, toilet training, sleep problems, temper tantrums, management of the difficult infant and child, single parenting, and dysfunctional parenting. The manual emphasizes open communication and therapeutic alliance between the physician and the patient and his or her family.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $30.00 (includes 160-page spiral bound manual and 22 spiral-bound cue cards).

Keywords: Adolescent health, Behavior, Behavior problems, Child development, Child health, Children, Dysfunctional families, Feeding, Health services, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Parents, Pediatrics, Physician patient relations, Preventive health services, Psychosocial development, Single parents, Sleep disorders, Stress, Tantrums, Toilet training

Ross Laboratories. 1979. Dietary modifications in disease: Mental and physical disabilities. Columbus, OH: Ross Laboratories, 21 pp.

Annotation: This document focuses on the nutritional management of children and adults with mental or physical disabilities. Major nutritional problems with Down syndrome and cerebral palsy patients are highlighted. Guidelines for feeding, and nutritional assessment are presented.

Contact: Ross Laboratories, Consumer Relations, 625 Cleveland Avenue, Columbus, OH 43215-1724, Telephone: (800) 227-5767 Secondary Telephone: (614) 624-7485 Contact Phone: (614) 227-3333 Web Site: http://www.ross.com Price unknown.

Keywords: Down syndrome, Cerebral palsy, Children with special health care needs, Feeding disorders, Nutrition

Davison WC, Levinthal JD. 1969. The compleat pediatrician: Practical, diagnostic,therapeutic and preventive pediatrics for the use of general practitioners, pediatricians, interns, and medical students. (9th ed.). Durham, NC: Duke University Press, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This book describes a wide range of pediatric conditions and other issues related to pediatric care, including respiratory conditions, nutritional and abdominal conditions; skin, contagious, and exanthem conditions; circulatory, metabolic, and glandular conditions; urogenital conditions; bone, joint, and muscle conditions; laboratory tests, feeding, diets, nursing, and therapy; growth and development; history, and physical exam; and chemotherapy and drugs.

Keywords: Bone diseases, Breastfeeding, Cardiovascular diseases, Child development, Child health, Communicable disease, Diet, Drug therapy, Feeding, Growth monitoring, Joint diseases, Medicine, Metabolic diseases, Muscular diseases, Nutrition, Pediatric care, Pediatrics, Physical examination, Respiratory disorders, Skin diseases, Tests, Urogenital diseases

Spock B, Huschka M. 1939. The psychological aspects of pediatric practice. Reprinted from Practitioners Library of Medicine and Surgery 13(?):757-808. 1938, 52 pp.

Annotation: This booklet, which is geared toward pediatricians, includes psychological aspects of pediatric practice, including feeding problems, psychogenic vomiting, thumb sucking, nail biting, speech disorders, constipation, anxiety, compulsions, difficulties at school, and other topics. The booklet strives to provide pediatricians with tools to help manage psychological problems in infants and children.

Keywords: Children, Compulsive behavior, Constipation, Eating disorders, Feeding disorders, Infants, Mental health, Nail biting, Pediatric practice, School failure, School phobia, Speech disorders, Thumb sucking, Vomiting

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.