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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (41 total).

Martinez M, Rider F, Cayce N, Forsell S, Poirier J, Hunt S, Crawford G, Sawyer J. 2013. A guide for father involvement in systems of care. Washington, DC: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information about the importance of fathers in the lives of their children and identifies potential consequences of non-involvement. The guide also offers strategies for systems and families to help fathers become more involved. Topics include statistics about the presence or absence of fathers in their children's lives, why children need fathers to be actively involved, ways for systems of care to best support fathers' involvement in individual- and family-service plans, how systems of care can involve fathers in all dimensions of development, different cultural perspectives on fatherhood, the role of young fathers, grandfather involvement, and the role of fathers in the child welfare system.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Child development, Child welfare agencies, Cultural factors, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Grandparents, Parenting skills, Service delivery systems

Solomon-Fears C. 2013. Fatherhood initiatives: Connecting fathers to their children. Washington, DC: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report briefly examines the role of the child support enforcement agency in fatherhood programs and discusses initiatives to promote and support father-child interaction outside the parents’ relationship. The appendix contains a legislative history of federally funded Responsible Federal Fatherhood Programs.

Contact: Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service, 101 Independence Avenue, S.E., Washington, DC 20540-7500, Fax: Web Site: http://www.loc.gov/crsinfo Available from the website.

Keywords: Child support, Fathers, Federal programs, Parent child relations

Office of Head Start, National Center on Parent, Family and Community Engagement, Early Head Start National Resource Center, Head Start Resource Center. 2013. Head Start father engagement birth to five programming guide. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Head Start, 68 pp.

Annotation: This guide addresses serving expectant fathers and fathers of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers and is designed for all Head Start staff. Other service providers who work with fathers, including teachers, home visitors, or parent leaders, may also find the guide useful. The guide is divided into three parts: (1) the foundations of father engagement programming, (2) program impact areas of father engagement, and (3) a toolkit. Related resources also are included. This new resource builds on the Office of Head Start's Parent, Family and Community Engagement Framework.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Father child relations, Fathers, Head Start, Paternal behavior, Program development, Young children

Berger LM, McLanahan S,. 2012. Child wellbeing in two-parent families: Influences of parental characteristics, relationships, and behaviors. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 43 pp. (Fragile families working paper: 11-13-FF)

Annotation: This paper examines differences in child outcomes by family type, defined by the marital and biological status of parents who live with a child. The paper investigates the extent to which differences in cognitive skills and behavior problems among 5-year-olds living in different types of families are associated with differences in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors between family types. The authors then decompose the mean difference between family types in each outcome into the proportion explained by differences between family types in characteristics, relationships, and behaviors and the proportion explained by differences between family types in the influence of these factors on outcomes. Methods and results are presented.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Families, Fathers, Marital status, Mothers, Parent child relations, Research, Statistical data, Young children

Scott ME, Steward-Streng NR, Manlove J, Moore KA. 2012. The characteristics and circumstances of teen fathers: At the birth of their first child and beyond. Child Trends, 6 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief presents a statistical portrait of adolescent fathers' characteristics at the time of their first child's birth; their union status (i.e., married, cohabiting, or not in a relationship) at the birth; their subsequent experience fathering a child, if any; and their residential status at birth and in young adulthood (i.e., whether they were living with their children).

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Age factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Fathers, Parent child relations, Public policy, Racial factors, Single parents, Statistical data, Young adults

Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Fathers and home visiting: What do we know?. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast May 1, 2012, focuses on improving outcomes for mothers and children by studying the potential contributions of fathers. Questions include What is known about fathers’ involvement in home visiting and the impact on family outcomes? Which models have increased fathers’ participation and how? What questions remain unanswered? Panelists on this webinar discuss these issues and recommend concrete strategies that have shown success in their communities.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Family support services, Father child relations, Fathers, Home visiting

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. [2011]. SCBIBS (Black infants better survival). (Columbia, SC): South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control,

Annotation: This website, which is geared toward black parents, provides information to help improve the health and well being of black children in South Carolina and their families. The site is divided into the following categories: black women, caring for infants, facts for fathers, health professionals, and dispelling myths. In each category, links are provided to information about topics that can help improve health, reduce risk for morbidity and mortality, and answer common questions.

Contact: South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, 2600 Bull Street, Columbia, SC 29201, Telephone: (803) 898-3432 Fax: (803) 898-3323 E-mail: info@dhec.sc.gov Web Site: http://www.scdhec.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Blacks, Child health, Consumer education materials, Families, Fathers, Health, Health status disparities, Infant development, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low income groups, Nutrition, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Parents, Physical activity, Prevention, Risk factors, South Carolina, Women's health

Texas Office of the Attorney General. 2011. Maps for new dads (rev.). Austin, TX: Texas Office of the Attorney General, 55 pp.

Annotation: This guide for new fathers explains how to take care of a new baby. It includes a prenatal checklist to help fathers know what to expect before the baby is born, guidelines on supporting and maintaining a healthy partnership with the baby's mother, and advice on being a responsible father after the baby is born. The guide addresses common concerns and fears, basic care of a newborn, and the importance of ongoing involvement in your baby's life. Included are hands-on activities and notes intended to help fathers become responsible parents. The guide is available in English and Spanish. Supplemental materials include a guide for making a mobile to hang over the baby's crib, posters, and other brochures.

Contact: Texas Office of the Attorney General, P.O. Box 12548, Austin, TX 78711-2548, Telephone: (512) 936-1737 Fax: (512) 469-3157 Web Site: http://www.oag.state.tx.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Child rearing, Consumer education materials, Father child relations, Fathers, Infant care, Parenting, Paternal behavior, Prenatal care, Spanish language materials

Berger LM, McLanahan SS. 2011. Child wellbeing in two-parent families: How do characteristics and relationships matter?. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 50 pp. (Fragile Families working paper: WP11-13-FF)

Annotation: This paper examines the role of individual and family characteristics and relationships, with regard to differences in well-being for children living with their biological mother and either their biological father or a social father. It investigates cognitive skills and externalizing behavior problems for 5-year-olds; the importance of mother, father, and child characteristics; mother-father relationships and co-parenting; mother-child relationships; and father-child relationships.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child development, Cognitive development, Families, Father child relations, Mother child relations, Parenting, Relationships, Parent child relations, Young children

Cobb-Clark DA, Tekin E. 2011. Fathers and youth's delinquent behavior. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 48 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17507)

Annotation: This paper analyzes the relationship between having one or more father figures in a young person's life and the likelihood that he or she will engage in delinquent criminal behavior. The paper focuses on the distinctions between the roles of residential and non-residential, biological fathers as well as stepfathers, and reports on differences observed based on the presence or absence of a father figure and on the gender of the child. The data analyzed in the study comes from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health administered by the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website after free registration.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Behavior development, Fathers, Juvenile delinquency, Longitudinal Research, Outcome evaluation, Parent child relations

Bond J, Cunningham S, Xang E, George Ph, Lu M, Perry E, Parker W, Scarborough K, Div M, Warren R. 2010. It takes two to tango: Defining the role of fathers. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief discusses the impact that men and fathers have on pregnancy and birth outcomes, and it considers how that role is often overlooked or not acknowledged. It highlights comments from experts in the field about how to define the role of father and what that means. The brief outlines key strategies and recommendations on how to further engage and include men in programs and policies related to women and children.

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1325 G Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.nationalhealthystart.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family relations, Father child relations, Fathers, Parenting

Public Broadcasting System, This Emotional Life . 2010. Early moments matter: Small steps, long-lasting effects. [Seattle, WA]: Vulcan Productions, 7 items.

Annotation: This toolkit for parents, families and child services professionals introduces ways in which parents and caregivers can help their infants build secure attachments, examines challenges encountered in the process, and provides suggestions on how challenges may be overcome. The toolkit includes a 30 minute DVD, a quick-reference guide answering attachment and parenting questions, three informational brochures and tips printed on a magnet and a bookmark. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Early Moments Matter, Web Site: http://www.earlymomentsmatter.org $10, plus $2.50 shipping and handling.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Bonding, DVDs, Family life education, Fathers, Infant health, Maternal mental health, Mothers, Multimedia, Newborn infants, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Spanish language materials

Minkovitz CS. [2007]. Fathers, maternal depressive symptoms, and parenting [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University, Population and Family Health Sciences, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a project to assess whether father involvement influences the relation of maternal depressive symptoms and maternal depression with maternal parenting and children's well-being. Report contents include an introduction into the nature of the research problem, the purpose, scope, and methods of the investigation, and the nature of the findings; a review of the literature; the study design and methods; detailed findings; a discussion and interpretation of findings; and policy implications. References conclude the report [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family relations, Father child relations, Fathers, Final reports, MCH research, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Parent participation, Postpartum depression

Rosenberg J, Wilcox WB. 2006. The importance of fathers in the healthy development of children. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Child Abuse and Neglect, 118 pp. (Child abuse and neglect user manual series)

Annotation: This manual, written for child protective services caseworkers, discusses child abuse and neglect and examines how to strengthen the roles of fathers within their children's lives and their own. Topics of the first section include (1) recognizing the value of fathers to children; (2) appreciating the importance of fathers to the case planning and service provision process; (3) understanding the issues unique to working with fathers; (4) effectively involving fathers in all aspects of case management, from assessment through case closure; and (5) working successfully with fathers in a wide range of family situations and structures. Section two provides examples of fatherhood programs and federal fatherhood initiatives. Endnotes are provided along with appendices including a glossary of terms, resource listings of selected national organizations concerned with fatherhood and child maltreatment, state telephone numbers for reporting child abuse, a cultural competence self-assessment questionnaire, tips for dads, and components instrumental in building a healthy marriage.

Contact: U.S. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (202) 260-5140 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child development, Child protective services, Child protective services, Community programs, Cultural competence, Family relations, Family relations, Father child relations, Fathers, Federal programs, Hotlines, Resources for professionals

Carlson M, McLanahan S, Brooks-Gunn J. 2005. Unmarried but not absent: Fathers' involvement with children after a nonmarital birth. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 29 pp. (Working paper no. 05-07-FF)

Annotation: This paper investigates the level and predictors of fathers' involvement with children approximately 3 years after a nonmarital birth. The authors examine the frequency of fathers' spending time with their child, their engagement in various father-child activities, and their help with household tasks. The authors also examine differences in fathers' involvement by parents' relationship status at the child's birth. The paper, which includes an abstract, discusses previous research, data and methods, bivariate results, and regression results. A discussion is included. Statistical information is presented in tables grouped together at the end of the paper. References are included.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Parents, Relationships, Single fathers, Single mothers, Single parents

Carlson MJ. 2005. Family structure, father involvement and adolescent behavioral outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, 29 pp. (Working paper no. 05-10)

Annotation: This paper uses data on biological fathers' relationships with their adolescent children to assess whether father involvement mediates the relationship between family structure (i.e., father absence) and four measures of adolescent behavior. The paper, which includes an abstract, discusses theoretical perspectives and previous research, data and methods, and results. Three tables appear at the end of the paper. A discussion and references are included.

Contact: Princeton University, Bendheim-Thoman Center for Research on Child Wellbeing, Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 Fax: (609) 258-5804 E-mail: crcw@opr.princeton.edu Web Site: http://crcw.princeton.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, Relationships, Research

Texas Office of the Attorney General. 2005. Parenting two-gether: Birth to 12 months. Austin, TX: Texas Office of the Attorney General, 134 pp.

Annotation: This booklet, which is geared toward new single fathers, addresses questions and concerns that new fathers may have. It discusses the benefits of establishing legal fatherhood and why it's important to be involved in a child's life, and it provides ideas for building a strong, loving connection to the child, steps for strengthening the relationship with the other parent, information on establishing legal paternity, and information on the value of involved fathers.

Contact: Texas Office of the Attorney General, P.O. Box 12548, Austin, TX 78711-2548, Telephone: (512) 936-1737 Fax: (512) 469-3157 Web Site: http://www.oag.state.tx.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Consumer education materials, Father child relations, Fathers, Infant behavior, Infant care, Infant feeding, Infants, Newborn infants, Paternity, Relationships, Single fathers

National Fatherhood Initiative. [2004]. Family structure, father closeness, and delinquency. Gaithersburg, MD: National Fatherhood Initiative, 29 pp.

Annotation: Using both a bivariate regression model and several multiple regression models, this paper sets out to test the hypothesis that family structure has a significant impact on the level of risk of adolescent delinquency even when controlling for other factors that encourage or inhibit delinquent acts. The paper also explores why family structure is important in determining delinquency in adolescents, and, specifically, it explores the role of "father closeness, " both in accounting for the importance of an intact family as an inhibitor of delinquency and as an important factor inhibiting delinquency in its own right. The paper includes an executive summary. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper concludes with a list of references.

Contact: National Fatherhood Initiative, 101 Lake Forest Boulevard, Suite 360 , Gaithersburg, MD 20877, Telephone: (301) 948-0599 Fax: (301) 948-4325 Web Site: http://www.fatherhood.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, High risk adolescents, Juvenile delinquency, Juvenile delinquents, Risk factors

National Fatherhood Initiative. [2004]. Family structure, father closeness, and drug abuse. Gaithersburg, MD: National Fatherhood Initiative, 29 pp.

Annotation: Using both a bivariate regression model and several multiple regression models, this paper sets out to test the hypothesis that family structure has a significant impact on the level of risk of adolescent drug use even when controlling for other factors that encourage or inhibit delinquent acts. The paper also explores why family structure is important in determining drug use in adolescents, and, specifically, it explores the role of "father closeness, " both in accounting for the importance of an intact family as an inhibitor of drug use and as an important factor inhibiting drug use is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper concludes with a list of references.

Contact: National Fatherhood Initiative, 101 Lake Forest Boulevard, Suite 360 , Gaithersburg, MD 20877, Telephone: (301) 948-0599 Fax: (301) 948-4325 Web Site: http://www.fatherhood.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Families, Father child relations, Fathers, High risk adolescents, Risk factors, Substance abuse

Foster LK, Gerould P. 2004. Fathers' impact on children's nutrition. Sacramento, CA: California Research Bureau, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is based on input from focus groups and research, looks at the relationship between fathers and children as it relates to children's nutrition. The report offers several options for policymakers that focus on targeting and outreach to fathers. The report, which includes an executive summary, also contains the following sections: (1) nutrition as a public policy issue, (2) fathers' involvement with their children, (3) fathers, children, and food, (4) food assistance resources, (5) a note about physical activity, (6) options for action, (7) bibliography, and (8) endnotes. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report. The report includes black-and-white drawings.

Contact: California Research Bureau, California State Library, 900 N Street, Suite 300, Sacramento, CA 94237-0001, Telephone: (916) 445-3551 Secondary Telephone: (916) 653-7843 Fax: (916) 654-5829 E-mail: crb@library.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.library.ca.gov/crb/index.html Available from the website. Document Number: CRB 04-002.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Fathers, Food banks, Low income groups, Obesity, Outreach, Parent child relations, Physical activity, Public policy, Supplemental food programs

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.