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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (74 total).

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health. 2017. The HRSA strategy to address intimate partner violence 2017-2020. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health, 53 pp.

Annotation: This document presents the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA’s) Office of Women’s Health’s agency-wide collaborative initiative that puts into practice a strategy to address intimate partner violence (IPV). The document is organized into four priority areas describing how HRSA employees can address IPV: (1) train the health care and public health work force to address IPV, (2) develop partnerships, (3) increase access to high-quality IPV-informed health care, and (4) address gaps in knowledge about IPV. For each priority area, objectives, activities, and key outcomes are presented, and lead agencies and collaborators are identified.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health, Parklawn Building, Room 18-46, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-8664 Fax: (301) 443-8587 E-mail: smatoff-stepp@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/WomensHealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Family violence, Federal initiatives, Professional training: Access to health care, Women’s health

Iowa Department of Public Health. 2014–. Parentivity. Des Moines, Iowa Department of Health,

Annotation: This web-based community for parents provides personalized content to reduce family risks and optimize parenting resourcefulness, family resilience, child growth, and school readiness. The website is designed to recognize early warning signs of risk in areas of health, prenatal care, parenting skills, family functioning, and child development and will alert parents and recommend supportive resources and strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child development, Child health, Community development, Domestic violence, Family economics, Family support programs, Home visiting, Injury prevention, Parenting, Program coordination, Public private partnerships, School readinesss

Children's Defense Fund. 2014. The state of America's children. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, irregular.

Annotation: This series of reports is a compilation and analysis of national and U.S. state-by-state data on child population, child poverty, family structure, family income, housing and homelessness, hunger and nutrition, health, early childhood, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and gun violence. Changes in key child and national well-being indicators are included.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Education, Ethnic groups, Family characteristics, Gun violence, High risk groups, Population surveillance, Poverty, Trends

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Intimate partner violence: Resources for victims and families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and web sites about domestic violence, including rape, abuse, incest, teen dating, legal counsel, and services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Battered women, Bibliographies, Child abuse, Domestic violence, Electronic publications, Emotional abuse, Family relations, Family violence, Hotlines, Parent child relations, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse

My Brother's Keeper Task Force. 2014. My Brother's Keeper Task Force report to the president. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report describes progress on a national initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color. The report outlines the building blocks for success across key life stages and presents initial recommendations and areas of opportunity for each of the key milestones. The focus areas include entering school ready to learn, reading at grade level by third grade, graduating from high school ready for college and career, completing postsecondary education or training, entering the work force, reducing violence, and providing a second chance. Cross-cutting areas of opportunity that span all focus areas are also discussed.

Contact: White House, Executive Office of the President, Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent males, Barriers, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Graduation, Juvenile justice, Learning, Life course, Men, Minority groups, Reading, School to work transition, Social factors, Violence prevention, Work family issues, Work force, Young adults

Futures Without Violence. 2013. Health cares about IPV: Intimate partner violence screening and counseling toolkit. San Francisco, CA: Futures Without Violence,

Annotation: This toolkit offers resources to help health care professionals and others identify and support clients facing intimate partner violence. Contents include strategies for preparing a health care practice to start screening; screening and intervention approaches and tools; resources tailored to pediatric, adolescent, or reproductive health care settings; strategies and resources for domestic and sexual violence advocates; and promising practices from the field.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Domestic violence, Emotional abuse, Family violence, Intervention, Physical abuse, Resources for professionals, Screening, Sexual abuse

U.S. Department of Justice, Attorney General's Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence. [2012]. Defending childhood: Protect, heal, thrive—Report of the Attorney General's National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, Attorney General's Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence, 162 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings and recommendations of a task force of leaders dedicated to protecting children from exposure to violence and to healing those who have been exposed. The report presents an overview of the problem and sets forth 10 foundational recommendations; offers a series of additional recommendations to ensure the reliable screening, assessment, and support of children exposed to violence; discusses effectively integrating prevention, intervention, and resilience across systems; and calls for a new approach to juvenile justice.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, 950 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20530-0001, Telephone: (202) 353-1555 E-mail: askDOJ@usdoj.gov Web Site: http://www.justice.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Children, Family support services, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Screening, Service delivery systems, Treatment, Violence, Violence prevention

Futures Without Violence. 2012-. Promising Futures: Best practices for serving children, youth, and parents experiencing domestic violence. San Francisco, CA: Futures Without Violence, multiple items.

Annotation: This website is designed to assist domestic violence (DV) programs in enhancing their services for infants, children, and adolescents who have experienced DV. The website provides access to a searchable database of evidence-based interventions and promising practices for serving children and youth exposed to DV.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Domestic violence, Family support programs, Infants, Children, Model programs

Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Linking Project Connect with home visiting models to tackle domestic violence. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast January 24, 2012, highlightes the multi-pronged approach of Project Connect at both the national and state levels and provides information for providers, advocates, and state leaders to structure effective home visiting programs. Panelists discuss how Project Connect curriculum and associated tools increase the capacity of home visiting programs to respond effectively with a research-informed approach to addressing domestic violence.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Domestic violence, Family support services, Home visiting, Prevention, Screening

Children's Defense Fund. 2012. The state of America's children handbook. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report presents key data on the health and well being of children across the United States. It provides information and statistics in areas such as child nutrition, poverty, family income, housing, health status, education, and juvenile justice, and presents tables that compare how children are faring in each state. Included are statistics based on the age, race, and ethnicity of children. Comparisons between the state of children in America and those in other industrialized nations are also provided. The report is intended to help inform and enable those who care about children to effectively stand up and advocate for them.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child health, Child nutrition, Child welfare, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Education, Family characteristics, Gun violence, High risk groups, Population surveillance, Poverty, Statistics

Maschinot B, Cohen J. 2012. Supporting babies and families impacted by caregiver mental health problems, substance abuse, and trauma: A community action guide. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 87 pp.

Annotation: This community action guide describes the experiences of a woman and her infant daughter to point out resources that service providers, advocates, and health professionals can use to better understand and respond to the needs of families and children with problems related to mental health, substance abuse, and trauma. The guide also presents information, resources, and tips to foster unified communities that are responsive to families' needs. Topics include the importance of the birth-to-age-5 developmental stage, threats to resilience, levels of stress in young children and families, protective factors, a strategic framework for action, and moving forward. Brief descriptions of successful programs are included.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SMA-12-4726.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children, Community programs, Domestic violence, Families, Family support services, High risk groups, Infants, Mental health, Parent support services, Resilience, Resource materials, Stress, Substance abuse, Vulnerability, Young children

Serna P. 2011. Adolescent suicide prevention program manual: A public health model for Native American communities. Waltham, MA: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, 52 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes the Adolescent Suicide Prevention Program, why the program was developed, how it was created, and how it was maintained from 1989 to 2005. Contents include information about the program's history and components. Topics include assessment; planning; capacity and staffing; building partnerships; planning for evaluation; clinical intervention; family violence prevention; school-based prevention programs; community education, awareness, and training; social services; surveillance; record-keeping and data analysis; evaluation; and sustainability.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Contact E-mail: pserna@nccbs.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family violence, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Data analysis, Data collection, Injury prevention, Intervention, Model programs, Needs assessment, Outreach, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning, Public health education, Public private partnerships, School health programs, Suicide prevention, Surveillance, Sustainability, Systems development

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2010. Women's health highlights: Recent findings. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 28 pp. (Program brief)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of recent findings from a cross-section of Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)-supported research projects on conditions especially important to women's health. Examples of topics included in the brief are cardiovascular disease, cancer screening and treatment, reproductive health, women and medications, and prevention. For each topic, facts are presented and then elaborated upon. The studies from which the facts are drawn are identified by author names, journal in which the study appears, and (in some cases) AHRQ grant or contract number.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ pub. no.10-P005.

Keywords: AIDS, Access to health care, Alternative medicine, Cancer, Cardiovascular diseases, Costs, Family planning, HIV, Homelessness, Hysterectomy, Osteoporosis, Pregnancy, Prevention, Reproductive health, Research, Screening, Treatment, Violence, Women's health, Working women

Pew Center on the States. 2010. The case for home visiting: Strong families start with a solid foundation. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief describes the benefits of a home visiting program in providing information and services to new parents and families throughout pregnancy and their child's first three years. Topics include the importance of prenatal care, safe and stable housing, counseling for tobacco or substance abuse, domestic violence prevention, as well as advice on building positive, loving relationships with their children.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Counseling, Domestic violence, Families, Family support services, Home visiting, Parent child relations, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Substance abuse prevention

Gewirtz AH. 2010. Homeless shelters, permanent/supportive housing, and transitional housing. North Bethesda, MD: Safe Start Center, 8 pp. (Moving from evidence to action; issue brief no. 6)

Annotation: This issue brief translates emerging research and program practice into action steps for providers to design and implement programs that meet the needs of children who are exposed to violence and living in homeless shelters or supportive or transitional housing. The brief aims to build the capacity of housing and homelessness service providers to offer sensitive, timely, and appropriate interventions that enhance children's safety, promote their resilience, and ensure their well-being. The brief includes case scenarios and analyses and a discussion of signs and symptoms of exposure to violence, impact of exposure to violence on children, working with families who live in homeless shelters or supportive or transitional housing, evidence-based practices, building the infrastructure, and special considerations.

Contact: Safe Start Center, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 5515 Security Lane, Suite 800, North Bethesda, MD 20852-5007, Telephone: (800) 865-0965 E-mail: info@safestartcenter.org Web Site: http://www.safestartcenter.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Domestic violence, Families, Family violence, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Interpersonal violence, Intervention, Research, Safety, Service delivery, Violence, programs

Child Welfare Information Gateway and FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. 2007. Promoting healthy families in your community: 2007 resource packet. Washington, DC: Child Welfare Information Gateway, 64 pp.

Annotation: This information packet was written to support child maltreatment prevention efforts by describing strategies and activities that promote protective factors. It is written for service providers, to encourage and support them as they engage and partner with parents to protect, nurture, and promote the healthy development of children. The packet includes suggestions for enhancing each of the five protective factors in families; tip sheets in English and Spanish for providers to use when working with parents and caregivers on specific parenting challenges; strategies for sharing the message about child abuse prevention in communities; and information about child abuse and neglect.

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Community based services, Family support programs, Parent support services, Parenting, Prevention, Program development, Violence prevention

Children's Trust Fund. 2007. The Nurturing Families Network policy and practice manual. [Hartford, CT]: Children's Trust Fund, 1 v.

Annotation: This manual provides guidance for a statewide network of neighborhood-based community centers and caring family professionals serving Connecticut's first-time parents. The program addresses the challenges they face and works to identify those at risk of harming their children and reducing the incidence and severity of abuse and neglect. Topics include issues in becoming parents and issues addressing poverty, social isolation, mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence. Contents of the manual are divided into four sections. Section one describes the Nurturing Families Network (NFN) and research and evaluation. Section two provides detail on the NFN program development and implementation; staffing requirements; job descriptions; professional development and training; clinical supervisions; and programs in nurturing connections, home visiting, and the nurturing parents group. The third section discusses working with agencies that mandate services, such as the Department of Children and Families. The final section provides documentation tools and contact information for resources throughout Connecticut.

Contact: Children's Trust Fund, 410 Capitol Avenue, Third Floor, Hartford, CT 06106, Telephone: (860) 418-8765 Fax: (860) 418-8780 E-mail: ctf@po.state.ct.us Web Site: http://www.ct.gov/ctf/site/default.asp Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Community programs, Connecticut, Domestic violence, Family centered services, Family support, Manuals, Prevention programs, Professional training, Program descriptions, Training materials

Sorvari C, Smith S. [2005]. Healthy Start impact report: 2001-2005—Healthy Birth Initiative II: Multnomah County Healthy Start. [Portland, OR]: Multnomah County Health Department, 53 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report describes phase II of a Healthy Start program to eliminate disparities in perinatal health in areas around northeast Portland, Oregon, from 2001-2005. Program elements include reducing high rates of infant mortality and low birth weight rates among African Americans, increasing the rates of early entry into prenatal care for pregnant Hispanic women, increasing male involvement activities, and family violence screening. Report contents include an overview of racial and ethnic disparity focused on by the project; descriptions of project implementation, management and governance; the impact of the project; a local evaluation; and the fetal and infant mortality review. Additional contents of the report include sample products developed during the project period, forms including project data, coverage of the program by local media, and local evaluation study reports. A brochure and a videotape are included as project product samples. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Blacks, Family violence, Final reports, Healthy Start, Hispanic Americans, Infant mortality, Low birth weight, MCH research, Oregon, Prenatal care, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Screening

Brindis C, Valderrama LT, Park J, Hair E, Cleveland K, Cochran S. 2005. Towards meeting the needs of adolescents: An assessment of federally funded adolescent health programs and initiatives within the Department of Health and Human Services. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center; Washington, DC: Child Trends, ca. 175 pp.

Annotation: This report aims to provide a picture for program managers and policymakers and to help shape future efforts as they make the most effective use of resources in meeting the needs of adolescents, their families, and their communities. The report ascertains what progress has been made at the federal level to meet the needs of adolescents in the following content areas: health and well-being, fitness, family and peer relationships, school environment, smoking, alcohol use, and violence. The report answers four questions about federal efforts to improve adolescent health: (1) is there a national policy that addresses the promotion of adolescent health?, (2) is the Department of Health and Human Services making an effort to create healthier environments for adolescents through a multi-level approach?, (3) what is the status of evaluations of federally funded adolescent health programs?, and (4) what can we learn from existing evaluations of programs that seek to influence adolescent health outcomes? Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report and in an appendix. Five appendices include an expanded methodology, tables, program resources, a bibliography, and program references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau].

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Alcohol consumption behavior, Communities, Families, Family relations, Federal programs, Final reports, Physical fitness, Public policy, Relationships, Schools, Smoking, Violence

Bosland J. 2005. Strengthening America's families: An agenda for municipal leaders. Washington, DC: National League of Cities, Institute for Youth, Education, and Families, 42 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on municipal leaders' role in strengthening American's families. Part 1 of the paper discusses how mayors, city council members, and other key city leaders can help mobilize, organize, and lead family-strengthening efforts focused on local families and the neighborhoods in which they live. Part 2 offers a set of strategies for launching and sustaining efforts to strengthen families. Part 3 looks more closely at some specific things city leaders can do to help create important connections for families. The paper contains a wide range of practical ideas for how municipal action can strengthen families.

Contact: National League of Cities, 1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 550, Washington, DC 20004-1763, Telephone: (877) 827-2385 Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.nlc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, City government, Communities, Community programs, Domestic violence, Early childhood development, Education, Employment programs, Families, Family support, Health, Housing, Local government, Neighborhoods, Nutrition, Safety, School age child care

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.