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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (209 total).

Johnson J. n.d.. Parent-Pediatric Partnerships: Strengthening Families to Make the Vulnerable Invincible [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Department of Health, 16 pp.

Annotation: This project was a partnership between families and their medical home to develop a demonstration model for care coordination for environmentally at-risk infants and toddlers in low-income culturally diverse urban and rural settings. The families were being served as part of the eligible population under P.L. 99–457, with an individualized family support plan (IFSP) developed for each family. The target population included many families of different ethnic origins. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, O.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133969.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Children with Special Health care Needs, Cultural Diversity, Families, Family Centered Health Care, Family Support Programs, Hawaiians, Health Promotion, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Low Income Population, PL 99-457, Parents, Preschool Children, Primary Care, Rural Population, Service Coordination, Urban Population

Thomson A, Lauderback E. 2022. Meeting the needs of pregnant and parenting adolescents through home visiting . Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates; Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 10 pp. (National Home Visiting Resource Center innovation roundup brief)

Annotation: This brief highlights home visiting models, affiliates, and initiatives serving the needs of adolescent parents. Examples include Teen Parent Connection: A Healthy Families America Affiliate, Family Spirit, Nurse-Family Partnership, and Show Me Strong (SMSF): A Parents as Teachers Initiative. The brief concludes with key service delivery features for consideration by other programs.

Contact: James Bell Associates, 3033 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 546-3230 Fax: (703) 243-3017 E-mail: info@jbassoc.com Web Site: http://www.jbassoc.com

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Family support services, Home visiting, Parent support programs, Pregnant adolescents

Singleton M, Atukpawu-Tipton G, Joraanstad A. 2022. Advancing equity in home visiting. Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates, 9 pp. (National Home Visiting Resource Center innovation roundup brief)

Annotation: This brief summarizes several initiatives to advance health and/or racial equity in home visiting. Some examples include: Home Visiting Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network 2.0 (HV CoIIN 2.0) Health Equity Collaborative, Michigan Home Visiting Initiative (MHV), and Massachusetts Racial Equity Movement. The brief also highlights the National Leadership Academy for the Public's Health (NLAPH) program.

Contact: James Bell Associates, 3033 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 546-3230 Fax: (703) 243-3017 E-mail: info@jbassoc.com Web Site: http://www.jbassoc.com

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Ethnic groups, Family support services, Health equity, Home visiting, Model programs, Race, Social factors

National Home Visiting Resource Center. 2022. 2022 home visiting yearbook. Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates; Washington, DC: Urban Institute, multiple items

Annotation: This yearbook presents 2021 data on early childhood home visiting and provides an up-to-date look at home visiting in action. The report answers critical questions about where home visiting programs are located; the number of families and children being served by home visiting programs; home visiting models; the staffing of home visiting programs; and what is happening in the states. The yearbook includes data on virtual home visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. The National Home Visiting Resource Center uses model, state, and administrative data sources, along with publicly available information, to present the national home visiting landscape.

Contact: James Bell Associates, 3033 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 546-3230 Fax: (703) 243-3017 E-mail: info@jbassoc.com Web Site: http://www.jbassoc.com

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Family support programs, Home visiting, Maternal health

Peyton S, deMonsabert J. 2021. How state leaders can promote meaningful family engagement at the state and program level. Menlo Park, CA: SRI International, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of research-based practices and policies that state leaders can use to support meaningful family engagement in children's early learning, which ultimately improves child and family outcomes. The document provides links to Federal statutes and policies that require family engagement, evidence-based strategies for promoting family engagement, barriers to fostering family engagement, and problem-solving methods to overcome barriers. In addition, the brief provides examples of successful programs from different states.

Contact: SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025-3493, Telephone: (650) 859-2000 Web Site: https://www.sri.com

Keywords: Early childhood education, Family centered services, Family health, Family support programs

Gears H, Casau A, Buck L, Yard R. 2021. Accelerating child health care transformation: Key opportunities for improving pediatric care. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report provides practical recommendations for providers, payers, and policy makers to consider in adopting approaches to transform child health care delivery. The report is a product of the Accelerating Child Health Transformation initiative, which works to identify, test, and disseminate a comprehensive and adaptable set of blueprints that can be used to transform child health care services to lead to improved child and family well-being, as well as racial equity. The Center for Health Care Strategies identified three key strategies that are integral to child health care transformation: adopting anti-racist practices and policies to advance health equity; co-creating equitable partnerships with patients, families, and providers; and identifying family strengths and addressing health-related social needs to promote resilience.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 Web Site: http://www.chcs.org

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Family centered services, Family health, Family support programs, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Policy development

National Home Visiting Resource Center. 2021. 2021 home visiting yearbook . Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates; Washington, DC: Urban Institute, multiple items

Annotation: This yearbook presents 2020 data on early childhood home visiting, focusing on where home visiting programs are located, the number of families and children being served by home visiting, home visiting models, and examples of state-level programs. The yearbook includes data on virtual home visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, this updated version uses revised data language with an equity focus. The National Home Visiting Resource Center uses model, state, and administrative data sources, along with publicly available information, to present the national home visiting landscape.

Contact: James Bell Associates, 3033 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 546-3230 Fax: (703) 243-3017 E-mail: info@jbassoc.com Web Site: http://www.jbassoc.com

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Family support programs, Home visiting

Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness. 2020. Home visiting models: Reviewing evidence of effectiveness. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, annual. (OPRE report #2020-126)

Annotation: This fact sheet describes a systematic review of home visiting research to determine which home visiting program models have sufficient evidence to meet U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) criteria for an "evidence-based early childhood home visiting service delivery model." The brief also summarizes the evidence of effectiveness for the 20 program models that met DHHS criteria. Topics include favorable and sustained program impacts on primary and secondary outcome measures and whether or not the model has been replicated.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Family support programs, Home visiting, Maternal health, Measures, Model programs, Outcome evaluation, Parenting, Research, School readiness, Sustainability, Young children

Annie E. Casey Foundation. 2017. Considering culture: Building the best evidence-based practices for children of color. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 16 pp. (Race for results case study series; 4)

Annotation: This case study examines the role of culture in informing and enhancing efforts to provide equity for children of color. Readers will learn how organizations are applying evidence-based practices in culturally relevant ways and how local programs are adopting nontraditional approaches to successfully serve communities of color. Case studies of successful programs include Strong African American Families, an evidence-based program that helps rural African American families strengthen family relationships, improve parenting skills, and develop youth competencies, and Con Mi Madre, which helps young Latinas and their mothers achieve goals for higher education.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Children, Education, Ethnic groups, Evidence-based programs, Family support, Infants, Measures, Neighborhoods, Policy development, Race, Racial groups, Work force, Young children, Youth

Jivanjee P, Brennan E, Gonzalez-Prats MC, Melton R, Hayden-Lewis K. 2016. Promoting positive pathways to adulthood. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, multiple items.

Annotation: These training modules are designed to help direct service providers engage transition age youth (ages 14–29) with serious mental health challenges in services. Each module includes information on key topics, video clips, interactive questions, and a quiz. Topics include partnering with youth and young adults; promoting recovery; increasing cultural awareness and building community support; fostering resilience and family support; promoting cross-cultural and intergenerational relationships; providing individualized and developmentally appropriate services; developing healthy relationships; planning partnerships with providers of other services and collaborating to bridge service gaps; promoting support from family, peers, and mentors; and using evidence-supported practices and individualizing interventions. An accompanying toolkit provides practice scenarios, video segments, role plays, and questions to help participants apply their learning to practice in their local context.

Contact: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University, Portland, OR Web Site: http://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Collaboration, Competency based education, Continuing education, Families, Family support programs, Health services delivery, Mental health, Multimedia, Peer support programs, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resilience, Training, Transition planning, Young adults

National Cancer Institute. 2016. Evidence-based cancer control programs (EBCCP). Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute, multiple items.

Annotation: This online, searchable database is designed to provide program planners and public health practitioners with easy and immediate access to evidence-based cancer control interventions and program materials. Program areas include breast, cervical, colorectal, and prostate cancer screening; diet and nutrition; HPV vaccination; informed decision making; obesity; physical activity; public health genomics; sun safety; survivorship/supportive care; and tobacco control.

Contact: National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20892-8322, Telephone: (800) 422-6237 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (301) 402-0555 E-mail: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.cancer.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NIH Pub. No. 12-7617.

Keywords: Breast cancer, Cervical cancer, Colon cancer, Decision making, Disease prevention, Evidence based medicine, Family support programs, Genomics, Human papillomavirus, Informed consent, Nutrition, Obesity, Online databases, Peer support programs, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Preventive health services, Risk factors, Screening, Smoking, Sun exposure, Survivors, Tobacco use, Vaccines

Pergamit M, Gelatt J, Stratford B, Beckwith S, Martin MC. 2016. Family interventions for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 92 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes existing evidence on family intervention strategies for youth experiencing or at risk of homelessness. The report includes a summary of common elements of effective interventions and a discussion of gaps in the evidence base. Key implementation lessons and challenges of implementing family intervention models are also included. The appendices contain information abuot the literature review methodology; key informants; and program descriptions including evidence-based, evidence-informed, promising, and emerging interventions as well as interventions of interest and those with mixed findings.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family support services, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Interventions, Model programs, Youth services

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2016. Medicaid-fee-for-service: State resources vary for helping beneficiaries find providers. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the proportion and characteristics of Medicaid beneficiaries served in fee-for-service arrangements and federal and state resources to help them find participating providers and report related challenges. A discussion of state actions to address access challenges is included. The report addresses medical care and specialty services such as behavioral/mental health care, oral health care, vision care, pharmacies, and ancillary services such as transportation and translation and sign language services.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: GAO-16-809.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Consumer satisfaction, Family support services, Hotlines, Information sources, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Provider participation, Service delivery systems, State programs

Brown LW, Camfield P, Capers M, Cascino G, Ciccarelli M, de Gusmao CM, Downs SM, Majnemer A, Miller AB, Saninocencio C, Schultz R, Tilton A, Winokur A, Zupanc M. 2016. The neurologist's role in supporting transition to adult health care: A consensus statement. Neurology 87(8):835–840, 7

Annotation: This article describes the child neurologist's role in planning and coordinating successful transition from the pediatric to adult health care system for youth with neurologic conditions. Topics include eight common principles that define the child neurologist's role in a successful transition process as outlined by a multidisciplinary panel, the evidence for successful transition models, and areas for future consideration. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Neurology, 1080 Montreal Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55116, Telephone: (651) 695-2717 Secondary Telephone: (800) 879-1960 Fax: (651) 695-2791 E-mail: memberservices@aan.com Web Site: http://www.aan.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Family support services, Financing, Health care systems, Interdisciplinary approach, Leadership, Legal issues, Model programs, Multidisciplinary teams, Neurologic disorders, Program coordination, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Young adults

National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. 2016. Families in crisis: The human services implications of rural opioid misuse. [Rockville, MD]: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, 9 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief discusses the unique rural challenges related to opioid use disorder and the experiences of families in crisis and recommendations for federal action. Topics include the opioid epidemic as a national problem with rural differentials, opioid abuse trends in rural communities, substance abuse and child welfare, the role of federal block grants, and barriers to treatment and services. Opportunities for creating a stronger treatment system for opioid use disorders are also addressed including the role of support services, care coordination and mental health workers to address current shortages in rural communities, increasing the availability of treatment programs, and research. A case study from Indiana is included.

Contact: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, 5600 Fishers Lane, 17W59D, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-0835 Fax: (301) 443-2803 Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/rural/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Child welfare, Crisis intervention, Drug addiction, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Health care systems, Health policy, Interagency cooperation, Mental health, Opiates, Policy development, Program coordination, Rural population, Service coordination, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Substance use disorders, Systems development, Work force

National Cancer Institute. 2015–. Adolescents and young adults with cancer. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources provide information about cancer in adolescents and young adults ages 15–39. Topics include types of cancers in young people, finding a doctor and hospital, treatment choices, coping and support, after treatment, and organizations serving adolescents and young adults. Reports, research, literature, and a quiz are also available.

Contact: National Cancer Institute, 6116 Executive Boulevard, Suite 300, Bethesda, MD 20892-8322, Telephone: (800) 422-6237 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (301) 402-0555 E-mail: cancergovstaff@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://www.cancer.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescents, Cancer, Consumer education materials, Disease management, Family support services, Financial support, Peer support programs, Research, Resources for professionals, Special health care needs, Young adults

American Academy of Family Physicians. 2015. Breastfeeding support and resources toolkit: A healthy start for your youngest patients. Leawood, KS: American Academy of Family Physicians, multiple items.

U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development. 2015. Early childhood self-assessment tool for family shelters (upd.). Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Early Childhood Development, 20 pp.

Annotation: This tool for shelter staff members contains recommendations and information on how family shelter environments, programming, policies, and staff can support early childhood safety and development. The tool contains recommendations for making shelter facilities safe and developmentally appropriate for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in five areas: health and safety, wellness and development, work force standards and training, programming, and food and nutrition. The tool categorizes recommendations by the estimated amount of resources requires. Links to references referenced in the tool and an action plan form are also included.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary and Interdepartmental Liaison for Early Childhood Development, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9200 Fax: (202) 205-4891 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/about Available from the website.

Keywords: Child safety, Community action, Community health services, Early childhood development, Families, Family support programs, Homelessness, Infants, Nutrition, Policy development, Preschool children, Program development, Self evaluation, Shelters, Standards, Toddlers, Training, Work force

University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit. 2015. The Parent-Child Assistance Program (PCAP): Prevention & intervention with high-risk mothers and their children. Seattle, WA: Washington State Department of Social and Health Services, Division of Behavioral Health and Recovery, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes a program to prevent and/or reduce the risk of maternal alcohol and drug abuse by providing home visitation and intervention over a 3-year period by trained and supervised case managers. Contents include a description of the program goals, approach, client outcomes, and eligibility criteria. Topics include helping mothers build and maintain healthy independent family lives, assuring that children are in safe and stable homes, and preventing future births of alcohol and drug-exposed children.

Contact: University of Washington Health Sciences Administration, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, Fetal Alcohol and Drug Unit, 180 Nickerson Street, Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98109, Telephone: (206) 543-7155 Fax: (206) 685-2903 Contact E-mail: granttm@uw.edu Web Site: http://depts.washington.edu/fadu Available from the website.

Keywords: Alcohol abuse, Alcohol use during pregnancy, Case management, Child safety, Drug abuse, Family support programs, Fetal alcohol effects, High risk children, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Referrals, Risk factors, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment services, Washington, Women

Iowa Department of Public Health. 2014–. Parentivity. Des Moines, Iowa Department of Health,

Annotation: This web-based community for parents provides personalized content to reduce family risks and optimize parenting resourcefulness, family resilience, child growth, and school readiness. The website is designed to recognize early warning signs of risk in areas of health, prenatal care, parenting skills, family functioning, and child development and will alert parents and recommend supportive resources and strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child development, Child health, Community development, Domestic violence, Family economics, Family support programs, Home visiting, Injury prevention, Parenting, Program coordination, Public private partnerships, School readinesss

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.