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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (28 total).

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

Attendance Works. 2014. The power of positive connections: Reducing chronic absence through PEOPLE–Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement. [no place]: Attendance Works, 13 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides recommendations for schools and community partners for preventing chronic absence and outlines key steps for implementing a Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement (PEOPLE) strategy. Topics include identifying students and families most at risk and helping them build positive relationships that promote regular attendance in conjunction with a broader approach to nurturing a school-wide culture of attendance. The appendix offers specific tips to help district, school, and community leaders advance the approach.

Contact: Attendance Works, Web Site: http://www.attendanceworks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Community action, Community participation, Family school relations, Family support, Outreach, Peer support programs, Policy development, Relationships, School age children, School attendance, Students

Alliance for a Healthier Generation. 2014. Healthy Schools Program framework of best practices. New York, NY: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document describes complementary approaches to helping schools build healthier environments. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment, health education, physical education and other physical activity programs, nutrition services, health promotion staff, and family and community involvement. Through an assessment tool and a customized action plan, the framework is designed to help schools work toward the Alliance for Healthier Generation's National Healthy Schools Award.

Contact: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, c/o The Clinton Foundation, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (888) KID-HLTH E-mail: info@HealthierGeneration.org Web Site: https://www.healthiergeneration.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health education, Health promotion, Model programs, Nutrition services, Parent participation, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Workplace health promotion

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2013. The health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native children: Parental report from the National Survey of Children's Health, 2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 77 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook presents indicators of the health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native children based on the perception of their parents or primary caregivers. Contents include indicators of child health status, health care use, school and activities, family, and neighborhood. National-, regional-, and state-level data are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Children, Data, Environmental health, Family relations, Health care utilization, Health status, National surveys, Participation, Physical activity, School to work transition

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health and SHAPE America. 2013. National framework for physical activity and physical education. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, 3 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a multi-component approach by which school districts and schools use all opportunities for students to be physically active; meet the nationally-recommended 60 minutes of physical activity each day; and develop the knowledge, skills, and confidence to be physically active for a lifetime. The document presents components of a comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) to include quality physical education as the foundation; physical activity before, during, and after school; staff involvement; and family and community engagement Resources to support CSPAPs such as cross-cutting documents, data sources, assessment and policy tools, and topical resources are also included.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: After school programs, Community participation, Comprehensive programs, Family centered services, Family school relations, Interdisciplinary approach, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School age children, School districts, School health programs, Schools

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2013. Results from the School Health Policies and Practices Study 2012. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 147 pp.

Annotation: This report provides state- and district-level data on each of the following eight components of the Coordinated School Health (CSH) model: health education, physical education, health services, mental health and social services, nutrition services, healthy and safe school environment, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement. Screenings, notifications, and referrals for oral health problems are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community participation, Data sources, Family school relations, Health education, Health services, Mental health, Nutrition services, Physical education, Policy analysis, Prevalence, Prevention programs, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Social services, Trends, Workplace health promotion

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2012. Parent engagement: Strategies for involving parents in school health. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adolescent and School Health, 27 pp.

Annotation: This guide describes strategies schools can take to increase parent engagement in promoting positive health behaviors among students. Contents include parent engagement in schools, how the strategies were developed, why parent engagement in schools is important, and how school staff can increase parent engagement in school health. The guide includes examples of ways school staff can connect with parents, provide parent support, communicate with parents, provide volunteer opportunities, support learning at home, encourage parents to be part of decision making at school, and collaborate with the community. Solutions for common challenges to sustaining parent engagement are also discussed.

Contact: National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatits, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop K-29, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, Telephone: 800-232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Family centered services, Family school relations, Parent participation, Parent support services, Parents, School health, Strategic planning

Demissie Z, Brener ND, McManus T, Shanklin SL, Hawkins J, Kann L. 2011-. School health profiles 201_: Characteristics of health programs among secondary schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, biennial.

Annotation: This report summarizes a biennial survey of middle and high school principals and lead health education teachers to assess school health policies and practices in states, large urban school districts, and territories. Topics include school health education requirements and content, physical education and physical activity, practices related to bullying and sexual harassment, school health policies related to tobacco-use prevention and nutrition, school-based health services, family engagement and community involvement, and school health coordination. Maps, questionnaires, and data files are also available.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Family school relations, Health policy, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program coordination, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety, Service coordination, Sexual harassment, Statistics, Surveys, Tobacco use, Trends

National School Boards Association. 2011. Families as partners: Fostering family engagement for health and successful students. Alexandria, VA: National School Boards Association, 11 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides an overview of family engagement as it relates to school health and student achievement. It discusses school health policies, practices, and strategies that school boards and public education administrators can use to effectively engage families. Sidebars provide inks to additional tools and resources such as sample family engagement policies, evidence-based practices, and family engagement surveys.

Contact: National School Boards Association, 1680 Duke Street, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 838-6722 Fax: (703) 683-7590 E-mail: info@nsba.org Web Site: http://www.nsba.org

Keywords: Academic achievement, Education, Family school relations, Parent child relations, Parent participation, School health, School linked programs

National Center on Parent, Family and Community Engagement. 2011. Family engagement and ongoing child assessment. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Head Start, 12 pp.

Annotation: This set of documents outlines how information that Head Start programs collect about children's learning and development can be used with families. The documents identify strategies that support the development of staff-parent relationships, and provide guidance to staff on sharing information with families. Additional topics include questions programs might ask to assess their parent and family engagement activities and how data can be used to support a child's learning from birth through school entry.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Confidentiality, Data, Families, Family centered services, Family school relations, Head Start, Legal responsibility, Outcome and process assessment

Mayer G, Kuklierus A. 2010. What to do for teen health. Whittier, CA: Institute for Healthcare Advancement, 163 pp. (Easy to read, easy to use)

Annotation: This book is written for parents and others caring for adolescents, explaining the body changes occurring at this stage, recognizing signs of trouble, and providing information on when and where to get help. It is written using simple language in an easy-to-read style and is illustrated with drawings that reinforce the information it contains. Section topics include tips on how to deal with emotional and physical changes such as growth and development, self-esteem, friends, school, sports, depression, dating and sex, driving, smoking, alcohol, drugs and safety issues. A glossary and an index are also included.

Contact: Institute for Healthcare Advancement, 501 South Idaho Street, Suite 300, La Habra, CA 90631, Telephone: (562) 690-4001 Secondary Telephone: (800) 434-4633 Fax: (562) 690-8988 E-mail: info@iha4health.org Web Site: http://www.iha4health.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-9701245-2-X.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent mental health, Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Consumer education materials, Family school relations, Low literacy materials, Parent child relations, Parenting, Physical development, Safety

Kugler EG. 2009. Partnering with parents and families to support immigrant and refugee children at school. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 15 pp. (Issue brief no. 2)

Annotation: This paper summarizes how the recent influx of immigrant and refugee children has changed the dynamics of classrooms in America, describes the impact of the refugee and immigration experience on students, and examines the role of the family and how to partner with families for improved student mental health. It also presents summary descriptions of 15 model programs developed by the Caring Across Communities grant initiatives.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Cultural competence, Demography, Families, Family school relations, Mental health, Migrants, Model programs, School age children, School role

Action for Healthy Kids. 2008. Progress or promises?: What's working for and against healthy schools. [Skokie, IL]: Action for Healthy Kids, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report presents perspectives gathered by interview of school administrators, parents, educators, nutrition and health professionals, wellness advocates, federal and local government agencies, community groups, school board members, students, and others on the progress towards implementing healthy eating and physical activity programs in schools and the deficits that remain after five years of work by Action for Healthy Kids and like-minded groups at the national, state, and grassroots levels. In addition to perceptions of healthy eating and physical activity programs, the report assesses the growth of public awareness about school wellness, stakeholder roles and activities, and resources. The report identifies gaps to be addressed in future initiatives.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: https://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community programs, Disease prevention, Exercise, Family school relations, Health education, Health promotion, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Programs, School health education, School lunch programs

Davidson JC. 2008. What's right for kids II: Building healthy nutrition and physical activity environments at school. Madison, WI: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes best practices that school nutrition and wellness leaders have implemented in Wisconsin to positively impact student achievement. It also provides tools to define and support an environment that promotes healthy eating and activity. It addresses the characteristics and activities of a successful wellness team, how parents promote a healthy school environment, physical activity and healthy eating, how students can be involved in the process, healthy eating and good nutrition, and how to evaluation local wellness policies.

Contact: Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, 125 South Webster Street, Madison, WI 53707-7841, Telephone: (608) 266-8960 Secondary Telephone: (800) 441-4563 Web Site: http://dpi.state.wi.us/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Communities, Community programs, Families, Family school relations, Food consumption, Nutrition, Nutrition programs, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention, Schools, Wisconsin

Knitzer J, Lefkowitz J. 2006. Pathways to early school success: Helping the most vulnerable infants, toddlers, and their families. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 37 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on the challenges of helping infants and toddlers whose earliest experiences, environments, and relationships expose them to high levels of stress. The brief describes 10 strategies that programs and communities can take to ensure that these infants and toddlers and their families are connected to sufficiently intensive supports to place them on a path to early school success.The brief, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following main sections: (1) setting the context (definiing vulnerability; the rationale for paying special attention to vulnerable infants, toddlers, and families), (2) appropriate intervention goals, (3) 10 strategies to help infants, toddlers, and families at high risk for poor outcomes, and (4) moving forward (principles to guide policy, practice, and advocacy). The brief includes three appendices: (1) Vulnerable Infants, Toddlers, and Families Conference participant list, (2) contact information for resources, and (3) additional national resources.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Families, Family support services, High risk children, High risk infants, Infant development, Infant health, Intervention, Parent child relations, School readiness, Stress, Vulnerability

Brindis C, Valderrama LT, Park J, Hair E, Cleveland K, Cochran S. 2005. Towards meeting the needs of adolescents: An assessment of federally funded adolescent health programs and initiatives within the Department of Health and Human Services. San Francisco, CA: National Adolescent Health Information Center; Washington, DC: Child Trends, ca. 175 pp.

Annotation: This report aims to provide a picture for program managers and policymakers and to help shape future efforts as they make the most effective use of resources in meeting the needs of adolescents, their families, and their communities. The report ascertains what progress has been made at the federal level to meet the needs of adolescents in the following content areas: health and well-being, fitness, family and peer relationships, school environment, smoking, alcohol use, and violence. The report answers four questions about federal efforts to improve adolescent health: (1) is there a national policy that addresses the promotion of adolescent health?, (2) is the Department of Health and Human Services making an effort to create healthier environments for adolescents through a multi-level approach?, (3) what is the status of evaluations of federally funded adolescent health programs?, and (4) what can we learn from existing evaluations of programs that seek to influence adolescent health outcomes? Statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report and in an appendix. Five appendices include an expanded methodology, tables, program resources, a bibliography, and program references. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau].

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Alcohol consumption behavior, Communities, Families, Family relations, Federal programs, Final reports, Physical fitness, Public policy, Relationships, Schools, Smoking, Violence

Weiss HB, Faughnan K, Caspe M, Wolos C, Lopez ME, Kreider H. 2005. Taking a closer look: A guide to online resources on family involvement. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Family Research Project, 49 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide contains annotated Web links to recent (published in 2000 or afterwards) research, information, and tools about family involvement, including parenting practices to support children's learning and development, home-school relationships, parent leadership development, and collective engagement for school improvement and reform. The guide is divided into the following seven sections: (1) knowledge development, (2) professional development, (3) standards, (4) programs, (5) tools, (6) convening, and (7) special initiatives. Each section includes an annotated list of resources with a description of the resource and a link to where it can be found on the Web. The resources in each section are also grouped into content areas that share a common theme or type of publication, and there is a brief description for each section. The resource guide includes one appendix that lists the organizations included in the guide in alphabetical order and notes the sections where the organizations can be found.

Contact: Global Family Research Project™, Third Sector New England, 89 South Street, Boston, MA 02111, E-mail: info@GlobalFRP.org Web Site: http://www.GlobalFRP.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Families, Family school relations, Initiatives, Internet, Parenting, Programs, Resource materials, Schools, Standards

Blum R. 2005. School connectedness: Improving students' lives. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Population and Family Health Sciences, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the importance of school connectedness for children who move frequently, especially children from military families. The report discusses the value of school connectedness, how individuals create school connectedness, how school environments create school connectedness, school culture and connectedness, and strategies warranting further research. References and additional readings are also provided.

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Population, Family, and Reproductive Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room E4527, Baltimore, MD 21205, Telephone: (410) 955-3384 Fax: (410) 955-2303 E-mail: pmartin@jhsph.edu Web Site: http://www.jhsph.edu/dept/pfrh/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Family school relations, Child mental health, Children, Military, Schools

Schor EL, ed. 2004. Caring for your school-age child: Ages 5 to 12. New York, NY: Bantam Books, 1 v.

Annotation: This book provides information parents need to take care of children between the ages of 5 and 12. It designed to help the parents prepare their children for the world outside of the home. The book includes 60 chapters organized in these parts: promoting health and normal development, nutrition and physical fitness, personal and social development, behavior and discipline, emotional problems and behavior disorder, family matters, children in school, chronic health problems, and common medical problems. The book treats topics into two ways: it includes chapters which provide background information to help the parents develop a context for the problems their children face, and it contains chapters targeted to particular problems which provide specific suggestions for dealing with them. This book is the second of a three-volume series developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics and Feeling Fine Programs.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $29.95 plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Behavior, Behavior disorders, Child development, Child health, Child nutrition, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Developmental stages, Discipline, Emotional development, Family relations, First aid, Parenting, Parenting skills, Physical fitness, Psychosocial development, School adjustment, School age children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.