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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (155 total).

Select Media. n.d.. Consequences. New York, NY: Select Media, 1 videotape (54 minutes).

Annotation: This videotape looks at the consequences of unplanned adolescent pregnancy in Africa. It offers adolescents the perspective from a different culture on peer pressure, life goals, family relationships, and personal responsibility. The videotape is the story of two honor students, Richard and Rita, who promising futures changes dramatically when Rita becomes pregnant.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Africa, Audiovisual materials, Family relations, Peer pressure, Videotapes

Boston Healthy Start Initiative. n.d.. Outline of BHSI's pilot nurturing program presently funded through the Carnegie Foundation known as Connect the DOTS. Boston, MA: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 33 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes a pilot family nurturing program, in which parents and children attend a series of classes together. In outline form, the manual explains how the pilot program works and how it is implemented, the philosophy and constructs behind the program, the timeline and budget for the program, and an evaluation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Boston Healthy Start Initiative, 1010 Massachusetts Avenue, Second Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 534-5395 Secondary Telephone: (617) 534-9799 Contact Phone: (617) 534-7828 Fax: (617) 534-5358 E-mail: healthystart@bphc.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Boston Healthy Start, Community based services, Community programs, Facilitating services, Family relations, Family support services, Outreach, Parent education programs, Training materials

Family Voices, IMPACT. n.d.. The Affordable Care Act (ACA): Prevention and health promotion for everybody!. Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, IMPACT, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document encourages families to partner with health professionals on getting preventive health services and to take a lead role in promoting health at home and where they live, work, and play. Topics include how information sharing between families and health professionals can promote child health, the Affordable Care Act's preventive health services for children, the Bright Futures initiative, and tips for a healthy lifestyle. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Family Voices, IMPACT, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.E., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-impact.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bright Futures, Child health, Children, Families, Family centered care, Health care reform, Health promotion, Parent professional relations, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Preventive health services, Public private partnerships, Special health care needs

CrossBear S, LeGore S. n.d.. Family involvement in child-serving systems and the need for cross-system collaboration. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief reviews what has been accomplished to date in the development of the family voice in all child-serving systems including substance abuse, mental health, child welfare, juvenile justice, trauma support, education, and primary care. The review indicates what needs to occur to create true cross-systems collaboration supporting family involvement, so that youth and their families can fully access the service and supports they need to obtain and maintain optimum health.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Collaboration, Families, Family centered care, Health care systems, Interagency cooperation, Parent professional relations, Service coordination, Service delivery systems

National Child Traumatic Stress Network and Center for Resilient Families. n.d.. A guide to forming advisory boards for family-serving organizations. Minneapolis, MN: Center for Resilient Families, 12 pp.

Annotation: This document presents things to think about as an organization considers how an advisory board might enhance the values it provides. Topics include goals, types of boards (families only, families and providers), size of the board, board terms, member recruitment, preparing and orienting board members, structuring meetings, and empowering family partners.

Contact: Center for Resilient Families, Institute for Translation Research, University of Minnesota, 1100 Washington Avenue S, Minneapolis, MN 55415, Web Site: https://itr.umn.edu/crf/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Advisory committees, Community participation, Family relations

American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health. 2017. Pediatricians love babies and they love baby teeth!. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, 3 items.

Annotation: These resources provide information to help parents of infants ask their pediatrician about how they can partner to ensure that the infant’s mouth is healthy. The resources discuss how to care for an infant’s teeth before they erupt. The resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Campaign for Dental Health, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 E-mail: fluoride@aap.org Web Site: http://www.ilikemyteeth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family centered care, Health literacy, Infants, Multimedia, Oral health, Parent professional relations, Pediatric care, Preventive health services, Primary care, Spanish language materials

U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. 2016–. Guide to improving patient safety in primary care settings by engaging patients and families. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, multiple items.

Annotation: This guide for primary care health professionals provides four strategies they can adopt to improve patient safety, as well as materials to support adoption. Topics include supporting adoption of teach-back, a technique to ensure health care professionals that they have explained medical information clearly so that patients and their families understand what is communicated to them; helping patients and their families prepare for and become more fully engaged in their medical appointments; engaging with patients and caregivers to create a complete and accurate medical list for addressing medication reconciliation and management issues; and the warm handoff, a transfer of care from one clinician to another, where the handoff occurs in front of the patient and family. Contents include implementation guides, interactive learning modules, posters and handouts, fact sheets, sample processes and procedures, staff checklists, and videos.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Family centered care, Health literacy, Participation, Patient care, Physician patient relations, Prevention programs, Primary care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Role, Safety programs

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health and Autism Speaks. 2016. Experience matters: A view into the health and wellbeing of US children and families with autism spectrum disorder. Baltimore, MD: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, 117 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook for families, advocates, policymakers, and researchers provides a national portrait of how children in the United States receive their diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), how their daily lives are impacted, and how their families are doing. Topics include the prevalence of ASD, diagnosing ASD, the child's health, health care and related services, school and social wellbeing, and coping with ASD. The appendices contain information on the ASD data presented in the chartbook including a glossary, a crosswalk of the data sources, methodological information, and guidance for accessing the data. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, E-mail: info@cahmi.org Web Site: https://childhealthdata.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents with special health care needs, Autism, Child health, Child with special health care needs, Coping, Data sources, Diagnosis, Early intervention services, Family health, Prevalence, Relationships, Special health care services, Statistical data

Jivanjee P, Brennan E, Gonzalez-Prats MC, Melton R, Hayden-Lewis K. 2016. Promoting positive pathways to adulthood. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, multiple items.

Annotation: These training modules are designed to help direct service providers engage transition age youth (ages 14–29) with serious mental health challenges in services. Each module includes information on key topics, video clips, interactive questions, and a quiz. Topics include partnering with youth and young adults; promoting recovery; increasing cultural awareness and building community support; fostering resilience and family support; promoting cross-cultural and intergenerational relationships; providing individualized and developmentally appropriate services; developing healthy relationships; planning partnerships with providers of other services and collaborating to bridge service gaps; promoting support from family, peers, and mentors; and using evidence-supported practices and individualizing interventions. An accompanying toolkit provides practice scenarios, video segments, role plays, and questions to help participants apply their learning to practice in their local context.

Contact: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University, Portland, OR Web Site: http://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Collaboration, Competency based education, Continuing education, Families, Family support programs, Health services delivery, Mental health, Multimedia, Peer support programs, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resilience, Training, Transition planning, Young adults

[U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services]. 2016. Serving special populations: Rural areas–Fast facts for assisters. [Baltimore, MD: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services], 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for people who assist health care consumers living in rural areas provides information about health insurance eligibility and enrollment barriers and what assisters can do to bolster education and outreach efforts in rural areas. Scenarios and resources are included.

Contact: U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244, Telephone: (877) 267-2323 Secondary Telephone: (410) 786-3000 Fax: Web Site: https://www.cms.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Communication, Community participation, Costs, Family support services, Health insurance, Outreach, Relationships, Resources for professionals, Rural populations, Transportation, Trust

Demissie Z, Brener ND, McManus T, Shanklin SL, Hawkins J, Kann L. 2015. School health profiles: Characteristics of health programs among secondary schools. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 191 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a biennial survey of middle and high school principals and lead health education teachers to assess school health policies and practices in states, large urban school districts, and territories. Topics include school health education requirements and content, physical education and physical activity, practices related to bullying and sexual harassment, school health policies related to tobacco-use prevention and nutrition, school-based health services, family engagement and community involvement, and school health coordination. Maps, questionnaires, and data files are also available.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Family school relations, Health policy, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program coordination, School health education, School health programs, School health services, School safety, Service coordination, Sexual harassment, Statistics, Surveys, Tobacco use, Trends

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Intimate partner violence: Resources for victims and families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and web sites about domestic violence, including rape, abuse, incest, teen dating, legal counsel, and services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Battered women, Bibliographies, Child abuse, Domestic violence, Electronic publications, Emotional abuse, Family relations, Family violence, Hotlines, Parent child relations, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse

National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships. 2014. Partnering with your child's provider. Albuquerque, NM: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, 6 pp. (Tips: Caring for a child with special health care needs)

Annotation: This fact sheet explains how families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) can develop partnerships with their child's doctors and providers to improve health outcomes. It explains how to prepare for an office visit and how to communicate effectively with health providers. Included are resources to help families gather information and make decisions concerning treatment options for their child. The fact sheet also suggests ways to encourage families and providers to become involved in advocacy efforts. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Communication, Family centered care, Parent professional relations, Provider participation, Spanish language materials

Agoratus L. 2014. Affordable Care Act (ACA): Why oral health is important for children with special health care needs and how to access it. Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, 2 pp. (ACA tip sheet)

Annotation: This tip sheet for parents of children with special health care needs provides information about the importance of good oral health care. Topics include finding oral health coverage, resources for families who do not have health insurance, and partnering with oral health professionals.

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Dental care, Families, Family centered care, Health care reform, Health insurance, Oral health, Parent professional relations, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Special health care needs

National Association for the Education of Young Children. 2014. Program administrator's guide to evaluating safe sleep and SIDS reduction practices: Criterion 5.A.12. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help administrators of programs serving infants under age 12 months to focus program improvement efforts on safe sleep and SIDS risk reduction practices. Contents include instructions for administrators; a definition of SIDS and other infant deaths; linking research on SIDS to child care accreditation criteria; and reflective questions and optional related activities on observable safe sleep practices, ongoing monitoring plan, and collaboration with families. Myths and facts, tips on infant sleep hygiene, and related resources are included.

Contact: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1313 L Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 232-8777 Secondary Telephone: (800) 424-2460 Fax: (202) 328-1846 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.naeyc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Collaboration, Family professional relations, Infant death, Infants, Injury prevention, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Research, Resources for professionals, SIDS, Sleep position

Attendance Works. 2014. The power of positive connections: Reducing chronic absence through PEOPLE–Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement. [no place]: Attendance Works, 13 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides recommendations for schools and community partners for preventing chronic absence and outlines key steps for implementing a Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement (PEOPLE) strategy. Topics include identifying students and families most at risk and helping them build positive relationships that promote regular attendance in conjunction with a broader approach to nurturing a school-wide culture of attendance. The appendix offers specific tips to help district, school, and community leaders advance the approach.

Contact: Attendance Works, Web Site: http://www.attendanceworks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Community action, Community participation, Family school relations, Family support, Outreach, Peer support programs, Policy development, Relationships, School age children, School attendance, Students

Hughes D. 2014. A review of the literature pertaining to family-centered care for children with special health care needs. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 32 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes findings from a review of selected research related to family-centered care (FCC) for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Contents include highlights from studies that examine the following components of FCC: family-provider partnerships, coordinated care, racial/ethnic and linguistic barriers, and culturally competent care. It also examines access, unmet need and satisfaction for CSHCN and outcomes of FCC and medical homes.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Families, Family centered care, Health care delivery, Language barriers, Literature reviews, Parent professional relations, Service coordination, Special health care needs

Alliance for a Healthier Generation. 2014. Healthy Schools Program framework of best practices. New York, NY: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document describes complementary approaches to helping schools build healthier environments. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment, health education, physical education and other physical activity programs, nutrition services, health promotion staff, and family and community involvement. Through an assessment tool and a customized action plan, the framework is designed to help schools work toward the Alliance for Healthier Generation's National Healthy Schools Award.

Contact: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, c/o The Clinton Foundation, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (888) KID-HLTH E-mail: info@HealthierGeneration.org Web Site: https://www.healthiergeneration.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health education, Health promotion, Model programs, Nutrition services, Parent participation, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Workplace health promotion

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.