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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (67 total).

Jivanjee P, Brennan E, Gonzalez-Prats MC, Melton R, Hayden-Lewis K. 2016. Promoting positive pathways to adulthood. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, multiple items.

Annotation: These training modules are designed to help direct service providers engage transition age youth (ages 14–29) with serious mental health challenges in services. Each module includes information on key topics, video clips, interactive questions, and a quiz. Topics include partnering with youth and young adults; promoting recovery; increasing cultural awareness and building community support; fostering resilience and family support; promoting cross-cultural and intergenerational relationships; providing individualized and developmentally appropriate services; developing healthy relationships; planning partnerships with providers of other services and collaborating to bridge service gaps; promoting support from family, peers, and mentors; and using evidence-supported practices and individualizing interventions. An accompanying toolkit provides practice scenarios, video segments, role plays, and questions to help participants apply their learning to practice in their local context.

Contact: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University, Portland, OR Web Site: http://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Collaboration, Competency based education, Continuing education, Families, Family support programs, Health services delivery, Mental health, Multimedia, Peer support programs, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resilience, Training, Transition planning, Young adults

Brown LW, Camfield P, Capers M, Cascino G, Ciccarelli M, de Gusmao CM, Downs SM, Majnemer A, Miller AB, Saninocencio C, Schultz R, Tilton A, Winokur A, Zupanc M. 2016. The neurologist's role in supporting transition to adult health care: A consensus statement. Neurology 87(8):835–840, 7

Annotation: This article describes the child neurologist's role in planning and coordinating successful transition from the pediatric to adult health care system for youth with neurologic conditions. Topics include eight common principles that define the child neurologist's role in a successful transition process as outlined by a multidisciplinary panel, the evidence for successful transition models, and areas for future consideration. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Neurology, 1080 Montreal Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55116, Telephone: (651) 695-2717 Secondary Telephone: (800) 879-1960 Fax: (651) 695-2791 E-mail: memberservices@aan.com Web Site: http://www.aan.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Family support services, Financing, Health care systems, Interdisciplinary approach, Leadership, Legal issues, Model programs, Multidisciplinary teams, Neurologic disorders, Program coordination, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Young adults

Wirth B, Kuznetsov A. 2016. Shared plan of care: A tool to support children and youth with special health care needs and their families. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center for Medical Home Implementation; [Portland, ME]: National Academy for State Health Policy, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document for clinicians, families, state Title V programs, and others provides recommendations on suggested content to include in a shared plan of care for children and youth with special health care needs requiring multiple services and supports. It also provides examples of templates and tools for creating a shared plan of care. Topics include what information should be included in a shared plan of care, where a shared plan of care resides, the family's role in shared care planning, and how state agencies can support the use of shared plans of care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Patient/Family-Centered Medical Home, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-7605 Secondary Telephone: (800) 433-9016, ext. 7605 Web Site: https://medicalhomeinfo.aap.org/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Family centered care, Medical home, Model programs, Planning, Role, Service coordination, Special health care needs, State programs, Title V programs, Young adults

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2014. What home visitors can do to help their clients achieve adequate birth spacing and avoid unplanned pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 4 pp. (Briefly)

Annotation: This brief for home visitors and for sites implementing home visiting programs provides information on why pregnancy planning and, in particular, adequate birth spacing matters for the health of both women and infants as well as their families. It also offers simple guidance for home visitors on how to discuss pregnancy planning and spacing as part of home visits. Descriptions of relevant resources are also included.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Family health, Family planning, Home visiting, Infant health, Preconception care, Pregnancy prevention, Prevention programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Women

Kotch JB, ed. 2013. Maternal and child health: Programs, problems, and policy in public health. (3rd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones and Barlett Learning, 532 pp.

Annotation: This text is organized according to fundamental principles of maternal and child health (MCH), covering traditional topics such as family planning; maternal, infant, and child health and development; as well as skills that are applicable across public heath disciplines such as planning, research, monitoring, and advocacy. Additional topics include environmental health, life course, oral health, program monitoring and evaluation, assessment and planning, MCH research, rights and justice, advocacy and policy development. Topics new in this edition include global health and health disparities in MCH and life course theory. Ancillary course materials for instructors are provided.

Contact: Jones and Bartlett Learning, 5 Wall Street, Burlington, MA 01803, Telephone: (800) 832-0034 Secondary Telephone: (978) 443-5000 Fax: (978)443-8000 E-mail: info@jblearning.com Web Site: http://www.jblearning.com $92.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-14496-1159-0.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child development, Child health, Environmental health, Family planning, Infant health, Life cycle, MCH programs, MCH research, Maternal health, Oral health, Program development, Program evaluation, Public health, Resource for professionals, Textbooks

Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability. 2013. Autism plan for Georgia. Atlanta, GA: Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a plan for improving access to comprehensive, coordinated health care and related services for children, youth, and adults with autism spectrum disorder and related developmental disabilities in Georgia. The plan addresses the following ten areas of activity: early identification and screening; referral and diagnosis; medical, behavioral health, and dental services; family support; early intervention and preschool services; elementary and secondary education; community services and supports; transition from youth to adult systems; adult services and supports; and emergency preparedness and first responders. For each area, the report provides a definition, quality indicators (problem statements and data drivers), and recommendations (objectives). The report also describes foundational supports considered in developing the recommendations including work force, awareness, informational resources, finances, and policy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Georgia State University School of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 75 Piedmont Avenue, Suite 514, Atlanta, GA 30303, Telephone: (404) 413-1281 Fax: (404) 413-1012 E-mail: cld@gsu.edu Web Site: https://disability.publichealth.gsu.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Autism, Community based services, Comprehensive health care, Diagnosis, Disaster planning, Early intervention, Educational objectives, Family centered care, Family support services, Financial planning, Georgia, Health care delivery, Life course, Policy development, Program coordination, Referrals, Screening, Special health care needs, State programs, Systems development, Transition planning, Work force

Ohio Infant Mortality Task Force. [2012]. Ohio's progress in combating infant mortality. Columbus, OH: Ohio Department of Health, Infant Mortality Task Force, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about Ohio's progress in combatting infant mortality. Topics include the Ohio Collaborative to Prevent Infant Mortality, new initiatives, state budget action, the Ohio Perinatal Quality Collaborative, sleep-related deaths and other unexplained infant deaths, preconception care, and the Medicaid family planning expansion.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-3543 Web Site: http://www.odh.ohio.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Family planning, Financing, Infant death, Infant mortality, Initiatives, Legislation, Medicaid, Ohio, Prenatal care, Prevention, SIDS, Sleep position, Safety, State programs

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2012. Explaining recent trends in the U.S. teen bith rate. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 31 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17964)

Annotation: This paper investigates possible explanations for the large decline in U.S. adolescent childbearing that occurred in the 20 years following the 1991 peak. The authors review previous evidence and the results of new analyses to arrive at a set of observations that are presented in the paper. The methodology and findings are presented.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Racial factors, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent parents, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Contraception, Ethnic factors, Family planning programs, Medicaid, Public policy, Research, Sexuality education, Statistical data, Trends

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2012. State coverage of preventive services for women under Medicaid: Findings from a state-level survey. [Menlo Park, CA]: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 8 pp. (Women's issue brief: An update on women's health policy)

Annotation: This issue brief reviews Medicaid's role in covering preventive care for women, presents key findings related to women's health from a survey of Medicaid officials in all 50 states and the District of Columbia that collected baseline data on state coverage of preventive services before Affordable Care Act implementation (ACA), and discusses implications for women enrolled in Medicaid following the implementation of ACA. The brief provides background and discusses survey findings in the categories of Medicaid coverage of adult preventive services (breast and cervical cancers, reproductive health and family planning, chronic conditions predominantly affecting women, and pregnancy-related services) and the future of Medicaid; ACA, and preventive services.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Breast cancer, Cervical cancer, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Family planning, Health care reform, Health services, Legislation, Low income groups, Medicaid, Pregnancy, Prevention services, Preventive health services, Reproductive health, State programs, Statistical data, Surveys, Women's health

Guttmacher Institute. 2012. State facts about Medicaid and family planning. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute,

Annotation: This website provides facts about Medicaid and family planning by state. Users may view a fact sheet for each state that includes information about the need for family planning services, the impact of publicly funded services, and the importance of Medicaid in the state. The site can also be searched by the following subjects: abortion, adolescents, contraception, pregnancy, and services and financing. Other related information is also presented.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Abortion, Access to health care, Adolescents, Contraception, Family planning, Financing, Health services, Medicaid, Pregnancy, State programs, Statistical data

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Family Planning. 2011. Title X family planning annual report: Forms and instructions. (Reissue). Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Family Planning, ca. 60 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is intended for family planning services delivery projects authorized and funded under the Population Research and Voluntary Family Planning Programs (Title X of the Public Health Service Act) within the Office of Population Affairs (OPA), describes the requirements for submitting family planning annual reports to OPA. The report includes general instructions, terms and definitions, and forms and instructions. The report concludes with a list of abbreviations and acronyms, one appendix: collecting and tabulating multi-face responses, and a list of references.

Contact: Office of Population Affairs Clearinghouse, P.O. Box 30686, Bethesda, MD 20824-0686, Telephone: (866) 640-7827 Fax: (866) 592-3299 E-mail: info@opaclearinghouse.org Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/opa/order-publications/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Annual reports, Family planning programs, Public Health Service Act, Title X

Burlew R, Philliber S, Suellentrop K. 2011. What helps in providing contraceptive services for teens. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 22 pp. (Putting what works to work)

Annotation: This monograph summarizes what is know about evaluated clinic interventions that help to prevent adolescent pregnancy. In addition to providing information about specific, clinic-based programs, the monograph reviews some critical policies and practices that may contribute to an intervention's success. The monograph identifies and describes three categories of most effective programs; discusses specific clinic protocols that appear to improve adolescent contracteptive use, as well as characteristics of successful clinics; and provides a chart identifying and describing programs that have been identified as most effective.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Contraception, Family planning clinics, Intervention, Prevention

Francisco VT, Cook GB, Sienkiewicz HC, Benhammou M, Langston K, Poillot-Micca M, Wilson S, Sanderson M, Matula D, Tant C. 2011. Promoting community engagement for systems improvement for children and youth with special health care needs: An action planning guide for community-based initiatives (rev. ed.). Greensboro, NC: University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Community Leadership and Mobilization Research Team; Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Children and Youth Branch, 102 pp.

Annotation: This monograph describes the Innovative Approaches (IA) initiative to put North Carolina children, including children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) and their families on a positive trajectory to success. It discusses improvement for community-wide systems of care that will effectively meet the needs of families of CYSHCN resulting in increased family satisfaction with services received and improved outcomes for this population. Topics include action planning, gathering background data and information about CYSHCN and their families, preparing the action plan, prioritizing systems change, and documenting progress and promoting renewal.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Health Education, 437 HHP Building,, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402-617, Telephone: (336) 334-5532 Fax: (336) 256-1158 E-mail: maloten2@uncg.edu Web Site: http://uncg.edu/phe

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Community based services, Family centered services, North Carolina, Program planning, Special health care needs, State programs

Manor, R. 2011. Report to OAPP: Supporting teen families, year five 2009-2010. Milwaukee, WI: Planning Council for Health and Human Services, 122 pp.

Annotation: This final report summarizes the findings of research done on the Supporting Teen Families program in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for Year Five of the project and cumulatively for Years One-Five. This program, developed and implemented by Rosalie Manor Community and Family Services and based on Healthy Start, Hawaii's Statewide Home Visitor Program,works to prevent repeat teen pregnancy using a home visitation model. The goal of the program is to assist adolescent parents in developing assets to form safe, healthy families and to avoid repeat pregnancies. Four outcome areas were tested and analyzed: (1) building strong family relationships, (2) learning strategies to become self-sufficient, (3) learning strategies to stay safe and healthy, and (4) demonstrating responsible family planning behaviors and attitudes.

Contact: Planning Council for Health and Human Services, 1243 North 10th Street, Suite 200, Milwaukee, WI 53205, Telephone: (414) 224-0404 E-mail: http://planningcouncil.org/contact.php Web Site: http://planningcouncil.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Family planning services, Family support services, Final reports, Home visiting, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention services, State programs, Wisconsin

Serna P. 2011. Adolescent suicide prevention program manual: A public health model for Native American communities. Waltham, MA: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, 52 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes the Adolescent Suicide Prevention Program, why the program was developed, how it was created, and how it was maintained from 1989 to 2005. Contents include information about the program's history and components. Topics include assessment; planning; capacity and staffing; building partnerships; planning for evaluation; clinical intervention; family violence prevention; school-based prevention programs; community education, awareness, and training; social services; surveillance; record-keeping and data analysis; evaluation; and sustainability.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Contact E-mail: pserna@nccbs.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family violence, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Data analysis, Data collection, Injury prevention, Intervention, Model programs, Needs assessment, Outreach, Prevention programs, Program descriptions, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning, Public health education, Public private partnerships, School health programs, Suicide prevention, Surveillance, Sustainability, Systems development

Guttmacher Institute. 2010. State Medicaid family planning eligibility expansions. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 3 pp. (State policies in brief)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about state Medicaid family planning eligibility expansions. The fact sheet offers background on the topic and includes highlights of different states' policies on eligibility.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Eligibility, Family planning, Income factors, Low income groups, Medicaid, Postpartum care, Reproductive health, State programs, Women's health

U.S. Office of Population Affairs. 2010. Reproductive health and Healthy People 2020. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Office of Population Affairs, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights the 62 Healthy People 2020 objectives that the Department of Health and Human Service's Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion determined most directly address reproductive health. The objectives are divided into eight topic areas: access to health services; adolescent health; education and community-based programs; family planning; HIV; immunization and infectious diseases; maternal, infant, and child health; and sexually transmitted diseases.

Contact: U.S. Office of Population Affairs, , 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (204) 453-2800 Fax: (204) 453-2801 E-mail: opa@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/opa Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Child health, Communicable diseases, Community programs, Disease prevention, Education, Family planning, HIV, Health promotion, Healthy People 2020, Immunization, Infant health, Reproductive health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Women's health

Butler AS, Clayton EW, eds; Committee on a Comprehensive Review of the HHS Office of Family Planning Title X Program; Institute of Medicine. 2009. A review of the HHS Family Planning Program: Mission, management, and measurement of results. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 468 pp., brief (4 pp.).

Annotation: This report examines the goals, management and administration, and program evaluation system of theTitle X family planning program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Department of Health and Human Services, Family planning programs, Federal programs, Program evaluation

James CV, Salganicoff A, Thomas M, Ranji U, Lillie-Blanton M, Wyn R. 2009. Putting women's health care disparities on the map: Examining racial and ethnic disparities at the state level. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 104 pp.

Annotation: This report assesses the status of women in the 50 states and the District of Columbia in three dimensions: health, access and utilization, and social determinants. The first three chapters present data on the prevalence and rates for 25 indicators encompassed by these dimensions for women in various racial and ethnic groups, as well as state-level disparity scores. The fourth chapter presents state-level data on 8 indicators reflecting state policies and payment for Medicare and family planning, and health care work force availability. Each chapter begins with a description of the dimension and the indicators contained within it and provides a description of each indicator and highlights of findings.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Ethnic factors, Family planning, Low income groups, Medicare, Public policy, Racial factors, Social factors, State programs, Statistical data, Women's health

Butler AS, Clayton EW, eds; Committee on a Comprehensive Review of the HHS Office of Family Planning Title X Program. 2009. A review of the HHS Family Planning Program: Mission, management, and measurement of results. [Washington, DC]: National Academies Press, 179 pp., plus 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This report presents the results of an independent evaluation of the Title X program (which provides grants to public and nonprofit private entities to assist in establishing and operating family planning clinics, training service providers, conducting research, and engaging in community-based education and outreach) performed by a committee convened by the Institute of Medicine. The report provides an overview of family planning in the United States; discusses Title X goals, priorities, and accomplishments; and provides information about program management and administration and collection of data to measure program outcomes.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-13117-9.

Keywords: Education, Family planning, Family planning clinics, Federal programs, Grants, Outreach, Program evaluation, Public Health Service Act, Title X, Research, Training

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.