Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups and Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services. 2016. Sharing child information to coordinate early childhood special education (ECSE) referrals: Guidance for clinics and schools. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups; Roseville, MN: Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for clinics and schools on the roles and responsibilities of medical providers and educational professionals in identifying and treating developmental and social-emotional concerns in young children from birth to age 5. Topics include communicating with families; referring for educational and medical evaluation; sharing evaluation results, including information about confidentiality and consent; and shared care planning. A link to a map of trained mental health professionals and a graphic showing a communication feedback loop are included.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups Program, P.O. Box 64882, St. Paul, MN 55164-0882, Telephone: (651) 201-3760 E-mail: health.childandteencheckups@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/ctc Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Clinics, Communication, Confidentiality, Early childhood, Early intervention, Emotional development, Family support, Legal issues, Mental health, Parent consent, Planning, Psychosocial development, Referrals, Role, School districts, Schools, Screening, Young children

John Snow, Inc. [2014]. Patient experience improvement toolkit: A guide for family planning agencies. Boston, MA: John Snow, Inc., 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit provides a step-by-step guide and helpful tools to improve patient experience and increase patient retention and offers simple, actionable advice to make improvements for little or no cost. It provides forms and templates for assessing the patient experience, for improving the clinic's image, and respecting patient privacy, and includes links to training videos.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Family planning clinics, Manuals, Patient care management

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Preconception Health+Health Care Initiative. 2014. National preconception / interconception care clinical toolkit. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, multiple items.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help primary care health professionals individualize their care to best meet their client's overall and reproductive health needs. The toolkit builds on a triaging approach whereby care is based on the likelihood of conception before the next routine primary care visit. Contents include a reproductive life plan assessment and specific clinical recommendations for ten components of routine primary care including family planning guidance, nutrition, infectious diseases and immunizations, chronic disease, medication use, substance use, previous pregnancy outcomes, genetic history, mental health, intimate and partner violence. Each of the ten components provides background information, clinical guidance and tools, client resources, and references. Additional clinician resources include continuing medical education, articles, and news relevant to preconception health care.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine, Center for Maternal and Infant Health, Old Clinic Building, Room 3018, Campus Box 7181, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7181, Telephone: (919) 843-7865 Fax: (919) 843-7865 E-mail: cmih@med.unc.edu Web Site: https://www.mombaby.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Continuing education, Family planning, Health care delivery, Preconception care, Primary care, Reproductive health, Resources for professionals, Women, Women's health

Frost JJ, Zolna MR, Frohwirth L. 2014. Contraceptive needs and services, 2012 update. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report provides estimates of contraceptive needs and services in the United States and of the impact that publicly-funded clinic services in particular have on preventing unintended pregnancy. Estimates are made for the national and state levels. The report highlights the national-level findings and trends, and includes summary tables of national and state data.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Contraception, Data, Family planning, Government financing, Needs assessment, Preventive health services, Trends

Kavanaugh ML, Anderson RM. 2013. Contraception and beyond: The health benefits of services provided at family planning centers. New York, NY: Guttmacher Institute, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes research on the health benefits associated with services provided at family planning facilities, whether directly related to contraceptive care or to benefits resulting from other services received during a family planning visit. Drawing on an extensive literature review conducted in 2012, the report examines the health benefits associated with delaying, planning, and spacing pregnancies; the noncontraceptive health benefits of contraceptive methods (for example, reduced cancer risk and treatment for menstrual-related symptoms and disorders); and the health benefits of receiving noncontraceptive services at Family Planning Clinics. The appendices include a list of the studies and journal articles reviewed.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Clinics, Contraceptive use, Family centered services, Family planning, Health services, Literature reviews, Maternal health, Research

Burlew R, Philliber S, Suellentrop K. 2011. What helps in providing contraceptive services for teens. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 22 pp. (Putting what works to work)

Annotation: This monograph summarizes what is know about evaluated clinic interventions that help to prevent adolescent pregnancy. In addition to providing information about specific, clinic-based programs, the monograph reviews some critical policies and practices that may contribute to an intervention's success. The monograph identifies and describes three categories of most effective programs; discusses specific clinic protocols that appear to improve adolescent contracteptive use, as well as characteristics of successful clinics; and provides a chart identifying and describing programs that have been identified as most effective.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescent sexuality, Community programs, Contraception, Family planning clinics, Intervention, Prevention

Gold RB, Zakheim M, Schulte JM, Wood S, Beeson T, Rosenbaum S. 2011. A natural fit: Collaborations between community health centers and family planning clinics. Washington, DC: George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, Department of Health Policy, Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative, 19 pp. (Policy research brief no. 26)

Annotation: This paper discusses federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) and family planning clinics funded through Title X of the Public Health Service Act and how they stand to benefit from the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2009. The paper describes both FQHCs and family planning clinics and who they serve and delineates the level of increased funding they can expect to receive. FQHCs' and family planning clinics' complementary strengths, the policy environment, and potential collaboration are discussed.

Contact: George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy, 950 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W., Sixth Floor, Washington, DC 20052, Telephone: (202) 994-4100 Web Site: http://publichealth.gwu.edu/departments/health-policy Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Family planning, Family planning clinics, Financing, Health facilities, Legislation, Low income groups, Public policy, Women's health

Butler AS, Clayton EW, eds; Committee on a Comprehensive Review of the HHS Office of Family Planning Title X Program. 2009. A review of the HHS Family Planning Program: Mission, management, and measurement of results. [Washington, DC]: National Academies Press, 179 pp., plus 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This report presents the results of an independent evaluation of the Title X program (which provides grants to public and nonprofit private entities to assist in establishing and operating family planning clinics, training service providers, conducting research, and engaging in community-based education and outreach) performed by a committee convened by the Institute of Medicine. The report provides an overview of family planning in the United States; discusses Title X goals, priorities, and accomplishments; and provides information about program management and administration and collection of data to measure program outcomes.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-13117-9.

Keywords: Education, Family planning, Family planning clinics, Federal programs, Grants, Outreach, Program evaluation, Public Health Service Act, Title X, Research, Training

COSMOS Corporation. 2003. Limited English proficiency as a barrier to family planning services: Final report. Bethesda, MD: COSMOS Corporation, 1 v.

Annotation: This report presents the findings of the Limited English Proficiency as a Barrier to Family Planning Services study. The study reviewed and assessed the language assistance services and activities being provided to limited English proficient individuals in seven Title X-funded family planning clinics. The report includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) study design and methodology, (3), study findings, (4) clinic profiles, (5) focus group findings, (6) recommendations, and (7) references. The report also includes a variety of exhibits such as study questions and estimated costs of language-assistance services. The report concludes with eight appendices.

Contact: COSMOS Corporation, 3 Bethesda Metro Center, Suite 420, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 215-9100 Fax: (301) 215-6969 Web Site: http://www.cosmoscorp.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Family planning clinics, Focus groups, Language barriers, Limited English speakers, Public Health Service Act, Title X, Research

Alan Guttmacher Institute. 2000. Fulfilling the promise: Public policy and U.S. family planning clinics. Washington, DC: Alan Guttmacher Institute, 48 pp.

Annotation: This report for service providers and policymakers reviews how and why the nationwide network of family planning clinics has developed and functions, and outlines some of the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead. The report includes the following sections: (1) introduction; (2) origins of the U.S. family planning clinic network; (3) the role of family planning clinics today; (3) the key role of Title X; (4) challenges and opportunities; (5) references and notes; and (6) tables. Statistical information is presented in numerous charts, graphs, and tables throughout the report.

Contact: Guttmacher Institute, 125 Maiden Lane, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 248-1111 Secondary Telephone: (800) 355-0244 Fax: (212) 248-1951; Washington, D.C. Office (202) 223-5756 E-mail: guttmacher@guttmacher.org Web Site: http://www.guttmacher.org $20; also available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-939253-55-0.

Keywords: Family planning, Family planning clinics, Federal MCH programs, Health care financing, Health services, Public Health Service Act, Title X, Public policy, Reproductive health, Resource centers

Berkowitz SA with Bernstein M. 1979. Final report: Development and testing of modes for delivering nutrition education and counseling to patients in family planning clinics. San Francisco, CA: Development Associates, ca. 200 pp.

Maher SM, O'Brien R. 1979. Integration of nutrition services in family planning clinics: A rationale for the development of a nutrition intervention protocol. Washington, DC: Human Resources Management, ca. 250 pp.

Development Associates. 1978. Work plan: Development and testing of modes for delivering nutrition education and counseling to patients in family planning circles. San Francisco, CA: Development Associates, 113 pp.

Roe DA. 1977. Assessment of need for nutritional counseling as a component of family planning information and education services: Final report. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Division of Nutritional Sciences, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the results of a contract from the Bureau of Community Health Services to investigate and examine the nutritional status of a representative sample of clients of selected family planning clinics and test two models of delivery of nutritional counseling. The project was carried out in Onondaga County (NY) Health Department.

Keywords: Family planning clinics, MCH research, Maternal nutrition, New York, Nutrition counseling

Urban and Rural Systems Associates. 1976. Improving family planning services for teenagers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 120 pp.

Annotation: This report contains the results of surveys of adolescent patients at family planning clinics. Their answers and the aspects of clinics that were most important to them are highlighted, confidentiality, location, and convenience. Copies of the surveys used and a list of related organizations are included.

Contact: Urban and Rural Systems Associates, Pier 1-1/2, San Francisco, CA 94111, Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescent pregnancy, Consumers, Family planning, Family planning clinics, Federal programs, Surveys

Urban and Rural Systems Associates. 1976. Improving family planning services for teenagers: Executive summary. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, 31 pp.

American Public Health Association, Program Area Committee on Population and Public Health. 1968. Family planning: A guide for state and local agencies. New York: American Public Health Association, 154 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist state and local agency personnel faced with the task of developing and administering family planning programs as part of their health services. It is intended to bring together basic information which such personnel should have before starting a program and to acquaint them with additional detailed sources of information and support. The background section discusses what family planning is, how to start a program, fertility and health, public policy, and fertility measurement and related trends. The program section discusses family planning methods, planning for clinical services, educational aspects, and evaluation of family planning programs. The appendices include basic references for state and local agencies, sources of financial support and consultation for family planning activities in the United States, and sources of information about training and a selected list of training centers.

Keywords: Evaluation, Family planning, Family planning clinics, Family planning education, Family planning programs, Fertility, Financing, Health services, Public policy, Training

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.