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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (180 total).

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. n.d.. Bringing it together: Head Start-state collaboration projects. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an introduction to the Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, which involve Head Start in state planning and policy making efforts that affect low income children and families. It includes some fact sheets on the Collaboration Projects, project profiles and contact list, legislation regarding Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, and an excerpt from the report of the Advisory Committee on Head Start Quality and Expansion.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early childhood education, Family support, Head Start, Low income groups, Policy development, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, State initiatives, Statewide planning

Jivanjee P, Brennan E, Gonzalez-Prats MC, Melton R, Hayden-Lewis K. 2016. Promoting positive pathways to adulthood. Portland, OR: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, multiple items.

Annotation: These training modules are designed to help direct service providers engage transition age youth (ages 14–29) with serious mental health challenges in services. Each module includes information on key topics, video clips, interactive questions, and a quiz. Topics include partnering with youth and young adults; promoting recovery; increasing cultural awareness and building community support; fostering resilience and family support; promoting cross-cultural and intergenerational relationships; providing individualized and developmentally appropriate services; developing healthy relationships; planning partnerships with providers of other services and collaborating to bridge service gaps; promoting support from family, peers, and mentors; and using evidence-supported practices and individualizing interventions. An accompanying toolkit provides practice scenarios, video segments, role plays, and questions to help participants apply their learning to practice in their local context.

Contact: Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University, Portland, OR Web Site: http://www.pathwaysrtc.pdx.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Collaboration, Competency based education, Continuing education, Families, Family support programs, Health services delivery, Mental health, Multimedia, Peer support programs, Public private partnerships, Relationships, Resilience, Training, Transition planning, Young adults

Boots SW, Romano G, Hayes G. 2016. Engaging parents, developing leaders: A self-assessment and planning tool for nonprofits and schools. Baltimore, MD: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help schools and other nonprofit organizations evaluate their parent engagement efforts and chart a path toward deeper partnerships with parents and other caregivers. Contents include an assessment and planning tool with instructions on how to use it and how to assess its results. Topics include building a culture of respect, inclusion, and equity; coaching parents; forming partnerships with parents; and partnering with others to serve the whole family. Examples of real-world strategies and programs are also included.

Contact: Annie E. Casey Foundation, 701 Saint Paul Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 547-6600 Fax: (410) 547-6624 E-mail: webmail@aecf.org Web Site: http://www.aecf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Competence, Culturally competent services, Equal opportunities, Family centered services, Leadership, Nonprofit organizations, Parents, Planning, Schools

Brown LW, Camfield P, Capers M, Cascino G, Ciccarelli M, de Gusmao CM, Downs SM, Majnemer A, Miller AB, Saninocencio C, Schultz R, Tilton A, Winokur A, Zupanc M. 2016. The neurologist's role in supporting transition to adult health care: A consensus statement. Neurology 87(8):835–840, 7

Annotation: This article describes the child neurologist's role in planning and coordinating successful transition from the pediatric to adult health care system for youth with neurologic conditions. Topics include eight common principles that define the child neurologist's role in a successful transition process as outlined by a multidisciplinary panel, the evidence for successful transition models, and areas for future consideration. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Neurology, 1080 Montreal Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55116, Telephone: (651) 695-2717 Secondary Telephone: (800) 879-1960 Fax: (651) 695-2791 E-mail: memberservices@aan.com Web Site: http://www.aan.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescents, Family support services, Financing, Health care systems, Interdisciplinary approach, Leadership, Legal issues, Model programs, Multidisciplinary teams, Neurologic disorders, Program coordination, Special health care needs, Transition planning, Young adults

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2016. Intrauterine devices (IUDs): Access for women in the U.S.. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 6 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet reviews the various intrauterine devices (IUDs) approved by the Food and Drug Administration, awareness, use, and availability of IUDs, and key issues in insurance coverage and financing of IUDs in the United States.

Contact: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2400 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, Telephone: (650) 854-9400 Secondary Telephone: (202) 347-5270 Fax: (650) 854-4800 Web Site: http://www.kff.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptive devices, Costs, Family planning, Financing, Health insurance

Wirth B, Kuznetsov A. 2016. Shared plan of care: A tool to support children and youth with special health care needs and their families. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center for Medical Home Implementation; [Portland, ME]: National Academy for State Health Policy, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document for clinicians, families, state Title V programs, and others provides recommendations on suggested content to include in a shared plan of care for children and youth with special health care needs requiring multiple services and supports. It also provides examples of templates and tools for creating a shared plan of care. Topics include what information should be included in a shared plan of care, where a shared plan of care resides, the family's role in shared care planning, and how state agencies can support the use of shared plans of care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Resource Center for Patient/Family-Centered Medical Home, American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-7605 Secondary Telephone: (800) 433-9016, ext. 7605 Web Site: https://medicalhomeinfo.aap.org/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Family centered care, Medical home, Model programs, Planning, Role, Service coordination, Special health care needs, State programs, Title V programs, Young adults

Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups and Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services. 2016. Sharing child information to coordinate early childhood special education (ECSE) referrals: Guidance for clinics and schools. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups; Roseville, MN: Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for clinics and schools on the roles and responsibilities of medical providers and educational professionals in identifying and treating developmental and social-emotional concerns in young children from birth to age 5. Topics include communicating with families; referring for educational and medical evaluation; sharing evaluation results, including information about confidentiality and consent; and shared care planning. A link to a map of trained mental health professionals and a graphic showing a communication feedback loop are included.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups Program, P.O. Box 64882, St. Paul, MN 55164-0882, Telephone: (651) 201-3760 E-mail: health.childandteencheckups@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/ctc Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Clinics, Communication, Confidentiality, Early childhood, Early intervention, Emotional development, Family support, Legal issues, Mental health, Parent consent, Planning, Psychosocial development, Referrals, Role, School districts, Schools, Screening, Young children

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2016. Sexual and reproductive health care best practices for adolescents and adults. New York, NY: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide for health care professionals in multiple settings describes best practices for sexual and reproductive health, with a focus on contraceptive care and the prevention, screening, and testing of sexually transmitted infections (STI) and HIV. Contents include information about leading with a sexual and reproductive justice approach; policy and practice recommendations; and best practices specific to the primary care and prenatal, labor and delivery, and postpartum care settings. Additional contents include tools and resources on topics such as contraception care and provision, STI and HIV prevention and treatment, adolescent health care, patient-centered care and the sexual and reproductive justice framework, LGBTQ health care, intimate partner violence and reproductive coercion, health insurance access, and financial assistance and device reimbursement.

Contact: New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 2 Lafayette Street, 20th Floor, CN-65, New York, NY 10007, Telephone: (212) 676-2188 E-mail: http://www.nyc.gov/html/mail/html/maildoh.html Web Site: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/index.page Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Contraception, Contraceptive use, Culturally competent services, Family planning, Health promotion, Preventive health services, Primary care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Reproductive health, Service integration, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2015. Medical home modules for pediatric residency education. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 51 pp.

Annotation: This series of five case-based, educational modules on key medical home principles is designed to be incorporated into existing curriculum by residency program directors and faculty. Collectively, the modules educate residents about characteristics and benefits of the patient‐ and family‐centered medical home, care coordination, care planning, transition to adult care and team-based care.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Coordination, Family centered care, Medical home, Patient care teams, Pediatric care, Planning, Professional education, Transitions

John Snow, Inc. [2014]. Patient experience improvement toolkit: A guide for family planning agencies. Boston, MA: John Snow, Inc., 1 v.

Annotation: This toolkit provides a step-by-step guide and helpful tools to improve patient experience and increase patient retention and offers simple, actionable advice to make improvements for little or no cost. It provides forms and templates for assessing the patient experience, for improving the clinic's image, and respecting patient privacy, and includes links to training videos.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Family planning clinics, Manuals, Patient care management

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, The INFO Project. 2014. A user's guide to Popline keywords. (10th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, The INFO Project, irregular.

Annotation: This thesaurus contains the vocabulary used to index and search the POPulation information onLINE database, POPLINE, the world's largest database of population, family planning, and related health issues information, both published and unpublished, containing over 300, 000 citations with abstracts available both online and in CD-ROM format. The thesaurus comprises an alphabetic listing of POPLINE keywords, showing the hierarchies for each term and a permuted display of the terms.

Contact: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 111 Market Place, Suite 310, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 659-6300 Fax: (410) 659-6266 E-mail: info@jhuccp.edu Web Site: http://www.jhuccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Demographics, Family planning, Population, Thesauri

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

Women Deliver. 2014. Invest in girls and women: Everybody wins–The path ahead to sustainable development. New York, NY: Women Deliver, 19 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit presents specific tasks and goals related to maternal and newborn health, family planning and reproductive health, women's health, education, and equality, with the aim of providing global partners with a course of action to advocate for the health and well-being of girls and women. Contents include infographics, data points, and key messages to make the case for investing in girls and women.

Contact: Women Deliver, 584 Broadway, Suite 306, New York, NY 10012, Telephone: (646) 695-9100 Fax: (646) 695-9145 E-mail: info@womendeliver.org Web Site: http://www.womendeliver.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Advocacy, Child health, Data, Education, Family planning, Female children, Goals, International health, Maternal health, Reproductive health, Women's health

Sonfield A, Hasstedt K, Gold RB. 2014. Moving forward: Family planning in the era of health reform. Washington, DC: Guttmacher Instititute, 52 pp.

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2014. The U.S. government and international family planning and reproductive health: Statutory requirements and policies. Menlo Park, CA: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation, 3 pp.

McAllister J. 2014. Achieving a shared plan of care with children and youth with special health care needs: An implementation guide. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 58 pp.

Annotation: This report, and accompanying implementation guide, recommend core content of a comprehensive and integrated plan of care for children with special health care needs, and the steps necessary to create and share a plan of care. Contents include the principles for successful use of a shared plan of care, the plan of care model, and a step-by-step approach to the shared plan of care. Topics include recognizing families' needs and strengths, building essential partnerships, constructing and implementing a plan of care, and ten steps toward implementation. A slide show is also available.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Comprehensive health care, Family centered care, Patient care planning, Service integration, Special health care needs, Young adults

Gavin L, Moskosky S, Carter M, Curtis K, Glass E, Godfrey E, Marcell A, Mautone-Smith N, Pazol K, Tepper N, Zapata L. 2014. Providing quality family planning services: Recommendations of CDC and the U.S. Office of Population Affairs. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report Recommendations and Reports 63(4):1-54,

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. 2014. What home visitors can do to help their clients achieve adequate birth spacing and avoid unplanned pregnancy. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 4 pp. (Briefly)

Annotation: This brief for home visitors and for sites implementing home visiting programs provides information on why pregnancy planning and, in particular, adequate birth spacing matters for the health of both women and infants as well as their families. It also offers simple guidance for home visitors on how to discuss pregnancy planning and spacing as part of home visits. Descriptions of relevant resources are also included.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Family health, Family planning, Home visiting, Infant health, Preconception care, Pregnancy prevention, Prevention programs, Unplanned pregnancy, Women

Kaye K, Gootman JA, Ng AS, Finley C. 2014. The benefits of birth control in America: Getting the facts straight. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 37 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines the benefits to women, men, children, and society of pregnancy planning and the use of birth control in particular. Topics include reduced unplanned pregnancy and abortion, improved maternal and infant health, improved family well-being, advancement in women's education and employment, and benefits to society.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-082-6.

Keywords: Abortion, Contraception, Costs, Educational attainment, Employment, Family health, Family planning, Infant health, Maternal health, Unplanned pregnancy

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.