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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 15 (15 total).

Findlay S. 2016. Paid family and medical leave. Bethesda, MD: Health Affairs, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines issues related to paid family or medical leave including laws governing employee benefits. Contents include characteristics of paid family and medical leave laws in California, New Jersey, New York, and Rhode Island. Topics include maximum and minimum length of paid leave, employee eligibility, benefit amount, waiting period, and funding mechanism. Opportunities to finance paid family and medical leave for all working people in the United States are also discussed. Links to related resources are provided.

Contact: Health Affairs, Project HOPE: The People-to-People Foundation, 7500 Old Georgetown Road, Suite 600, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 656-7401 Fax: (301) 654-2854 Web Site: http://www.healthaffairs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Employee benefits, Family leave, Financing, Legislation, Work family issues

National Partnership for Women and Families. 2014. Expecting better: A state-by-state analysis of laws that help new parents (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: National Partnership for Women and Families, 75 pp.

Annotation: This report documents workers' rights under state laws and the progress that states have made in promoting the economic security of expecting and new parents. It also includes a snapshot of state policies that more broadly assist family caregivers -- both parents and workers overall -- in addressing the needs of their children and other family members.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2600 Fax: (202) 986-2539 E-mail: info@nationalpartnership.org Web Site: http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/PageServer Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Family support, Parental leave, Policy, Policy analysis, Reports, State initiatives, State legislation, Working parents

National Partnership for Women and Families. 2014. Guide to the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA): Questions and answers (7th ed.). Washington, DC: National Partnership for Women and Families, 36 pp.

Annotation: This guide explains the provisions of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and how the FMLA protects jobs and health insurance. Requirements, remediation, and other leave laws and protections are discussed. The guide is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: National Partnership for Women and Families, 1875 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 986-2600 Fax: (202) 986-2539 E-mail: info@nationalpartnership.org Web Site: http://www.nationalpartnership.org/site/PageServer Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Employee benefits, Family leave, Legislation, Paternal leave, Public policy, Spanish language materials, Work family issues

Kossen J. 2013. Building a secure and healthy start: Family leave in the early years. Washington, DC: Zero To Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the importance of providing family leave for working parents of infants and young children. The report provides statistical information, discusses current family leave policy, provides policy recommendations, and discusses relevant research.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family leave, Infants, Parental leave, Parents, Public policy, Research, Working parents, Young children

Smith K, Schaefer A. 2012. Who cares for the sick kids?: Parents' access to paid time to care for a sick child. Durham, NC: Carsey Institute, 5 pp. (Issue brief no. 51)

Annotation: This brief analyzes employed parents’ access to five or more paid sick days annually to care for a sick child. Using data from the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce collected by the Families and Work Institute, the authors analyze differences in access between employed mothers and fathers by demographic and work-related characteristics. They report on the percentage of employed parents lacking access to paid sick days for care of children; the differences in reported work satisfaction based on the availability of leave; and the differences in the amount of work mothers and fathers report missing to care for a sick child. Figures and tables show who is responsible for the sick child among married employees the percentage of employed parents who lack access to different kinds of care; and the percentage of workers lacking access to leave based on select characteristics such as education, income level.

Contact: Carsey Institute, University of New Hampshire, 73 Main Street, Huddleston Hall G05B, Durham, NH 03824, Telephone: (603) 862-2821 Fax: (603) 862-3878 Web Site: http://www.carseyinstitute.unh.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Employee benefits, Family leave, National surveys, Statistics, Work family issues

Ochshorn S, Skinner C. 2012. Building a competitive future right from the start: How paid leave strengthens 21st century families. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 27 pp.

Annotation: This paper provides a brief history of paid family leave policy in the United Sates and abroad; synthesizes what is known about paid leave and its impact on family and civic life; and offers a set of recommendations for policymakers, public health and early childhood stakeholders, business leaders, and federal, state, and local education agencies.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Family leave, Infants, Public health, Public policy, Working parents, Young children

Zigler E, Muenchow S, Ruhm CJ. 2012. Time off with baby: Making the case for paid care leave. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 173 pp.

Annotation: This book, which focuses on the importance of paid parental leave after the birth of an infant, weighs the implications of existing research on child health and development along with what is known about the economic impact of parental leave policies as they have evolved in other nations and in the United States. The book defines various types of leave—maternity, paternity, parental, family, and newborn care. It discusses who receives parental leave and why or why not, who benefits from unpaid job protection under the Family and Medical Leave Act, and to what extent private firms are providing these types of leave for the care of infants or newly adopted children. Other practical issues, policy options, and financing mechanisms are also discussed.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $34.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 9781934019979.

Keywords: Adopted children, Adoption, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Economic factors, Families, Family leave, Fathers, Financing, Infants, Legislation, Mothers, Parental leave, Parents, Public policy, Working parents

Fass S. 2009. Paid leave in the states: A crticial support for low-wage workers and their families. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines existing state paid-leave policies, which some states have enacted in the absence of a federal policy. The brief discusses research on the benefits of family leave and describes the federal Family and Medical Leave Act. It then examines the strengths and limitations of existing state-level policies, with a focus on California, which in 2002 became the first state to enact paid family leave. The brief concludes with recommendations for state policymakers considering paid family leave, with an emphasis on how these policies could be crafted to best serve the needs of low-wage workers and their families.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Public policy, California, Families, Family leave, Federal programs, Legislation, Low income groups, Research, State programs, Working parents

Johnson TD. 2008. Maternity leave and employment patterns of first-time mothers: 1961-2003. Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau, 19 pp. (Current population reports, P70-113)

Annotation: This report examines trends in maternity leave and the employment patterns of women who gave birth to their first child between January 1961 and December 2003. The first section of the report analyzes trends in women's work experience prior to the birth of their first child and the factors associated with employment during pregnancy. Changes are placed in the historical context of the enactment of family-related legislation during the last quarter of the 20th century. The second section identifies the maternity leave arrangements used by women before and after the birth of their first child and the shifts that have occured in the mix of leave arrangements that are used. The third section discusses how rapidly mothers return to work after the birth of their first child and the factors related to the length of time they are absent from the labor force.

Contact: U.S. Census Bureau, 4600 Silver Hill Road, Washington, DC 20233, Telephone: (301) 763-4748 E-mail: webmaster@census.gov Web Site: http://www.census.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Employment, Family leave, Legislation, Mothers, Pregnancy, Statistical data, Trends, Working mothers

Ray R, Gornick JC, Schmitt J. 2008. Parental leave policies in 21 countries: Assessing generosity and gender equality. Washington, DC: Center for Economic Policy and Research, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the major national policies of 21 high-income economies as of June 2008. The report focuses on two aspects of parental leave policies: (1) the level of support provided to parents and (2) the degree to which leave policies promote an egalitarian distribution between mothers and fathers of the time devoted to child care. The report concludes with best practices culled from the 21 national experiences.

Contact: Center for Economic and Policy Research, 1611 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20009, Telephone: (202) 293-5380 E-mail: cepr@cepr.net Web Site: http://www.cepr.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Families, Family leave, Fathers, International programs, Model programs, Mothers, Parental leave, Public policy, Working parents

Ruhm CJ. 2004. How well do parents with young children combine work and family life?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 23 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 10247)

Annotation: This report examines trends in labor force involvement, household structure, and some activities that may complicate the efforts of parents with young children to balance work and family life. It considers whether employer policies mitigate or exacerbate these difficulties and provides comparisons between U.S. policies and those of other industrialized countries, and it speculates on some possible sources and effects of the differences. Additional topics include changes in labor supply, time investments, employer benefits, family leave policies, maternal employment and child care. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures grouped together at the end of the report. The report also includes a reference list.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Child care, Employer benefits, Employer initiatives, Families, Family economics, Family leave, Family support, Work family issues, Working mothers, Working parents, Young children

Drummond M, Seid R. 2001. Caring for infants and toddlers: Issues and ideas–a guide for journalists and policymakers. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 34 pp.

Annotation: This guide for journalists and policymakers is designed to give up-to-date information and resources about how American families care for their young children. The guide includes fact sheets on: (1) the changing demographics and caregiving needs of the American workforce; (2) the importance of high-quality care for young children; (3) existing government and private sector support for families; and (4) promising strategies for improving parental leave and child care. The guide also includes contact information for experts in child care and early childhood development, and a list of helpful organizations and Web sites. Statistical data are presented in chart and table formats throughout the publication.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early childhood development, Employer initiatives, Family leave, Federal initiatives, Infant care, Military, Model programs, Public private partnerships, State initiatives, Statistical data, Toddlers, Working mothers, Working parents, Young children

David and Lucile Packard Foundation. 2001. Caring for infants and toddlers. Los Altos, CA: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 157 pp., exec. summ. (7 pp.). (The future of children; v. 11, no. 1, Spring/Summer 2001)

Annotation: This issue of "The Future of Children" focuses on the daily care of the nation's youngest children -- those between birth and age three. The articles discuss the developmental needs of infants and toddlers, review the findings of recent child care studies, examine public opinion surveys, summarize the ways in which employers and governments try to help parents with infants to manage employment and caregiving, and describe recent innovations that seek to improve the care that these most vulnerable children receive. Case studies provide information on family and medical leave, child care within the family, military child care, Early Head Start for Low-Income Families, the Starting Points initiative, and a program in California.

Contact: David and Lucile Packard Foundation, 343 Second Street, Los Altos, CA 94022, Telephone: (650) 948-7658 E-mail: https://www.packard.org/contact-us Web Site: https://www.packard.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infants, California, Case studies, Child care, Child care services, Child development, Early Head Start, Employer initiatives, Family leave, Federal initiatives, International programs, Military, Program descriptions, Public opinion, Public private partnerships, State programs, Surveys, Toddlers, Young children

U.S. General Accounting Office. 1990. Children's issues: A decade of GAO reports and recent activities. Washington, DC: U.S. General Accounting Office, 57 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an annotated bibliography of reports by the General Accounting Office (GAO) in the areas of child care, child welfare and social services, education, health, housing, income security, nutrition, youth employment and training, and other child and family issues. Activities of GAO are also described.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO/HRD-90-162.

Keywords: Adolescent employment, Child care, Child health, Child welfare, Education, Family income, Housing, Nutrition, Parental leave, Social services, Training

U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 1990. Work and family patterns of American women: The family life cycl: 1985 [and] Maternity leave arrangements: 1961-85. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, 57 pp. (Current population reports. Special studies series; P23-165)

Annotation: The papers in this report focus on some of the social, demographic, and economic consequences of the expanding roles for women in U.S. society. The first paper, The Family Life Cycle: 1985, shows trends in the frequency and timing of marriage, divorce, remarriage, and fertility across several generations of women. The second paper, Maternity Leave Arrangements: 1961-85, presents research on factors associated with childbearing and labor force participation.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov $6.00.

Keywords: Work force, Divorce, Fertility, Marriage, Parental leave, Role, Women, Work family issues

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.