Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (138 total).

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. n.d.. Bringing it together: Head Start-state collaboration projects. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an introduction to the Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, which involve Head Start in state planning and policy making efforts that affect low income children and families. It includes some fact sheets on the Collaboration Projects, project profiles and contact list, legislation regarding Head Start-State Collaboration Projects, and an excerpt from the report of the Advisory Committee on Head Start Quality and Expansion.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early childhood education, Family support, Head Start, Low income groups, Policy development, Program descriptions, Public private partnerships, State initiatives, Statewide planning

Malach R. n.d.. Case Management for Parents of Indian Children with Special Health Care Needs [Final report]. Bernalillo, NM: Southwest Communication Resources, 20 pp.

Annotation: This project provided a model program for American Indian families and the professionals who served them. The program goals were to identify cultural, systemic, institutional, and policy barriers that inhibit Native American family participation in the "Western" health care/case management system; improve case management by facilitating effective communication between Native American families and the non-Native American health care professionals who serve them; and increase Native American family participation in health care policy development and planning forums in order to promote changes that improve services for Native American children and families. Activities included developing a videotape illustrating effective cross-cultural communication strategies for non-Indian health care providers and training an Indian parent advocate to help families seen at IHS special pediatric clinics. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158251.

Keywords: American Indians, Case Management, Chronically Ill, Community-Based Health Care, Coordination of Health Care, Developmentally Delayed/Disabled, Family-Based Health Care, Indian Health Service (IHS), Low income groups, Parents, Rural Population

Johnson J. n.d.. Parent-Pediatric Partnerships: Strengthening Families to Make the Vulnerable Invincible [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Department of Health, 16 pp.

Annotation: This project was a partnership between families and their medical home to develop a demonstration model for care coordination for environmentally at-risk infants and toddlers in low-income culturally diverse urban and rural settings. The families were being served as part of the eligible population under P.L. 99–457, with an individualized family support plan (IFSP) developed for each family. The target population included many families of different ethnic origins. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-133969.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Children with Special Health care Needs, Cultural Diversity, Families, Family Centered Health Care, Family Support Programs, Hawaiians, Health Promotion, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Low Income Population, PL 99-457, Parents, Preschool Children, Primary Care, Rural Population, Service Coordination, Urban Population

Center for Global Policy Solutions. 2016. Overlooked but not forgotten: Social Security lifts millions more children out of poverty. Washington, DC: Center for Global Policy Solutions, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to expand existing research about Social Security's indirect role in lifting children out of poverty by examining the effect on those living in extended households. It documents how the multi-generational impact of Social Security has grown and how it has provided an important and increasing income source across different racial and ethnic groups. Policy implications are included.

Contact: Center for Global Policy Solutions, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 975, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 265-5111 Fax: (202) 265-5118 E-mail: info@globalpolicysolutions.org Web Site: http://globalpolicysolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Ethnic factors, Family income, Federal programs, Intergenerational programs, Policy development. , Poverty, Racial factors, Social Security, Trends

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2016. Medicaid-fee-for-service: State resources vary for helping beneficiaries find providers. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report examines the proportion and characteristics of Medicaid beneficiaries served in fee-for-service arrangements and federal and state resources to help them find participating providers and report related challenges. A discussion of state actions to address access challenges is included. The report addresses medical care and specialty services such as behavioral/mental health care, oral health care, vision care, pharmacies, and ancillary services such as transportation and translation and sign language services.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available at no charge. Document Number: GAO-16-809.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Consumer satisfaction, Family support services, Hotlines, Information sources, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Provider participation, Service delivery systems, State programs

Redd Z, Sacks VH, Anderson Moore K, Gooze R. 2015. Poor, unemployed, and not on welfare: A statistical look at "disconnected families". Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 11 pp.

Annotation: This research brief uses data from the 2011/12 National Survey of Children's Health to provide a statistical look at children in disconnected families in the United States. The brief defines disconnected families as those households with at least one child (from birth to age 17), a household income at or below the federal poverty level, and with the following additional characteristics: (1) no one reported receiving cash assistance or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in the prior 12 months, and (2) no one was employed for at least 50 of the prior 52 weeks. Topics include demographic characteristics, receipt of other public assistance programs, family functioning, and parents' health status. The analysis compares children in disconnected families with children in other poor families, and with all children in families nationally.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Family characteristics, Family health, Health status, Low income groups, Public assistance, Statistical data

Sacks VH, Sticklor L, Murphey D, Anderson Moore K. 2015. Poor, unemployed, and not on welfare: The prevalence of "disconnected families" by state. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 9 pp.

Annotation: This research brief uses data from the 2011/12 National Survey of Children’s Health to quantify the population of children in disconnected families in each state, and to describe the extent to which these families access other public assistance programs. The brief defines disconnected families as those households with at least one child (from birth to age 17), a household income at or below the federal poverty level, and with the following additional characteristics: (1) no one reported receiving cash assistance or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in the prior 12 months, and (2) no one was employed for at least 50 of the prior 52 weeks.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Family characteristics, Family health, Health status, Low income groups, Public assistance, Statistical data

First Focus. 2015. Big ideas: Pioneering change–Innovative ideas for children and families. Washington, DC: First Focus, 153 pp.

Annotation: This compilation of 14 papers outlines ways to create opportunities for families in poverty. Topics include include emerging two-generation policies, using housing rules to tackle education inequalities for minority children, the costs of raising children, implementing a child allowance program, Roth IRAs and savings accounts for children, community schools and educational equity, higher-education tax spending, coordinating health care with home visits for new families, a policy agenda to expand economic opportunity, immigration decisions and children, systems of care to address the needs of commercially sexually exploited youth, and practices and policies to reduce the burden of childhood asthma.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Child health, Equal opportunities, Families, Family centered care, Intergenerational programs, Low income groups, Minority groups, Models, Organizational change, Policy development, Poverty, Service delivery, Systems development, Vulnerability, Youth

DeNavas-Walt C, Proctor BD. 2014. Income and poverty in the United States: 2013. Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 61 pp. (Current population reports; P60-249)

Annotation: This report presents data on income and poverty in the United States based on information collected in the 2014 and earlier Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplements. The report contains two main sections: one focuses on income and the other on poverty. Each section presents estimates by characteristics such as race, Hispanic origin, nativity, and region. Other topics, such as earnings and family poverty rates are included only in the relevant section.

Contact: U.S. Census Bureau, 4600 Silver Hill Road, Washington, DC 20233, Telephone: (301) 763-4748 E-mail: webmaster@census.gov Web Site: http://www.census.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Ethnic factors, Family income, Geographic factors, Poverty, Statistical data, Surveys

Gross BJ, Turner W, Machledt D. 2014. Advocate's guide to MAGI (upd.). Washington, DC: National Health Law Program, 71 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This document describes the modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) methodology for evaluating eligibility for health care affordability program applicants and enrollees. It also provides guidance on implementing and governing the methodology. Topics include Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) populations and eligibility categories subject or exempted from MAGI, determination of countable income, household composition in the marketplace vs. Medicaid/CHIP, household scenarios, MAGI conversion for Medicaid and CHIP, state options for the transition to MAGI-based eligibility systems, and MAGI and the single streamlined application. An accompanying webinar, The World According to MAGI, covers the ins-and-outs of the rules by working through hypothetical family scenarios.

Contact: National Health Law Program, 1441 I Street, N.W., Suite 1105, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 289-7724 E-mail: nhelp@healthlaw.org Web Site: http://www.healthlaw.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Applications, Children, Eligibility determination, Families, Family income, Federal initiatives, Health care reform, Health insurance, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State programs

Murphey D, Bandy T, Moore KA, Cooper PA. 2014. A fifteen-year (1997-2012) profile of children's overall health: National and state estimates, by family income level. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 8 pp.

Annotation: This report provides estimates on the proportion of children reported by parents to be in "very good" or "excellent" health, between 1997 and 2012. The report also examines trends in health status for children from birth to age 17, nationally and across states, and across family income-levels.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Data, Family income, Health status, Low income groups, Poverty, Research, Trends

Hernandez DJ, Napierala JS. 2014. Mother's education and children's outcomes: How dual-generation programs offer increased opportunities for America's families. New York, NY: Foundation for Child Development, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report documents the need for dual-generation strategies for families with low income and education levels to assure strong educational outcomes and upward economic mobility. The report describes the following three components of a comprehensive dual-generation strategy: high-quality early childhood education (pre-kindergarten through third grade); sectoral job training leading to a certificate, credential, or degree for high-wage/high-demand jobs; and wrap-around family and peer support services. Additional topics include results of an analysis of 13 economic, education, and health indicators, which highlight disparities in the well-being experienced by children with four different levels of mother's education. Opportunities for federal, state, and local governments are included.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Child health, Early childhood education, Educational attainment, Family support services, Government role, Intergenerational programs, Low income groups, Mothers, Statistical data, Vocational education, Work force

Kenney GM, Anderson N, Long SK, Dubay L, McMorrow S, Clemans-Cope L, Karpman M, Wissoker D. 2014. Taking stock: Health insurance coverage for parents under the ACA in 2014. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 11 pp. (Health reform monitoring survey)

Annotation: This brief uses data from the Health Reform Monitoring Survey to examine changes in health insurance coverage for parents living with their dependent children. Topics include distribution of uninsured parents by Medicaid expansion states, by family income, and by region. Geographic and health characteristics of uninsured parents are also discussed.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Family income, Geographic regions, Health insurance, Health status, Medicaid, Parents, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: , Preventive health services, Uninsured persons

Moore KA, Sacks VH. 2014. Profiles of adolescents who are not in good health. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 13 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief uses data from the 2011/2012 National Survey of Children's Health to examine the characteristics of adolescents whose parents rated their health as fair or poor, and compares those with the characteristics of adolescents who are described by their parents to be in better health. Contents include findings on adolescent health status by state and by race/ethnicity. The brief also presents information on the characteristics of adolescents' families and neighborhoods by adolescent health status. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Comparative analysis, Ethnic factors, Family characteristics, Family income, Health insurance, Health status, Individual characteristics, Neighborhoods, Special health care needs, Weight

Wall T, Nasseh K, Vujicic M. 2014. Fewer Americans forgoing dental care due to cost. Chicago, IL: American Dental Association, Health Policy Institute, 7 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief presents findings from an analysis of National Health Interview Survey data for the period 2000-2013 on cost-related barriers to oral health care. The analysis examines trends in percentages of people who needed but did not obtain select health care services and of those who indicated cost as a barrier to receiving needed oral health care. Data are presented by age and by household income.

Contact: American Dental Association, Health Policy Institute, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611-2678, Telephone: (312) 440-2500 Web Site: http://www.ada.org/en/science-research/health-policy-institute Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adults, Barriers, Children, Comparative analysis, Costs, Dental care, Family income, Needs assessment, Oral health, Statistical data, Trends

Pew Charitable Trusts, Home Visiting Campaign. 2013. Expanding home visiting research: New measures of success. [Philadelphia, PA]: Pew Charitable Trusts, Home Visiting Campaign, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights key findings from research conducted to build evidence needed to inform policymakers' decisions related to home visiting and to advance effective practice in home visiting programs. The brief also identifies opportunities for program improvements in states and for further study. Findings are presented in the following areas: lasting benefits of home visiting, for whom is home visiting effective, the importance of focused program content and of measurement, and what it means to be evidence-based.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Families, Family support services, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Public policy, Research, State programs, Young children

Johnston J and Stratus. 2013. Putting children first: Scenarios for the future of children's health and well being in the U.S.. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 35 pp. (Report)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the process by which scenarios about the future of children's health and well-being were created for a forum of philanthropists and children' health experts held in Aspen, CO, in July 2012. The report shares the scenarios, which paint four different portraits of how the state of children's health and well-being could evolve over the next several decades. The report also shares insights and implications that emerged from participants' interactions with the scenarios at the forum, as well as how these scenarious might be used to empower new actions and strategies for transforming the future of children's health and well-being.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child development, Child health, Economic factors, Educational factors, Families, Family support services, Health services, Low income groups, Social factors, Social services, Trends

Michalopoulos C, Duggan A, Knox V, Filene JH, Lee H, Snell EK, Crowne S, Lunquist E, Corso PS, Ingels JB. 2013. Revised design for the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program evaluation. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 101 pp. (OPRE report 2013-18)

Annotation: This report describes plans for a national evaluation of the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program (MIHOPE), a program launched in 2011 by the Administration for Children and Families and the Health Resources and Services Administration within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Contents include an overview, background on home visiting and goals for the evaluation, an overview of the proposed evaluation design, a sampling plan for the evaluation, the implementation study, the impact analysis and analysis of health systems outcomes, and the economic evaluation.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Costs, Families, Family support services, Federal programs, Health systems, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, Program evaluation, Social services, Women's health

Gwaltney MK, Goodson B, Walker DK. 2013. Cross-site evaluation of SAMHSA's Project Launch initiative: Key findings in the first year. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation, 64 pp. (OPRE report # 2013-59)

Annotation: This document describes the activities of the first year of Project Launch, a program whose primary objective is to promote the social, emotional, behavioral, and physical health and cognitive development of young children from birth to 8 years of age. The project has 24 grantees in three cohorts to work with a pilot community for five years, pursuing dual goals of improving systems and services. The document describes the components of the program and the process of the evaluation of the first year.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Communities, Community programs, Families, Family support services, Health promotion, Infants, Initiatives, Low income groups, National programs, Prevention, Program evaluation, Public health, Service delivery systems, State programs, Young children

Bandy T, Andrews KM, Moore KA. 2012. Disadvantaged families and child outcomes: The importance of emotional support for mothers. Child Trends, 9 pp. (Research-to-results brief)

Annotation: This research brief focuses on the link between the level of support that mothers facing social and economic disadvantages receive in raising their children and their children's development. The brief provides background on the challenges faced by children from socially and emotionally disadvantaged families, describes the analysis the authors conducted, and presents findings.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent development, Adolescents, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Child development, Children, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Family support, High risk groups, Income factors, Low income groups, Mental health, Mothers, Research, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.