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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (27 total).

Utah Children. 2016. Measures of child well-being in Utah. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Children, annual.

Annotation: This annual statistical summary provides information on the health, education, safety, and economic security of children in Utah. The introduction includes general demographic information about the state and presents a long-range view of what factors contribute to a family's well-being. Analytical essays are included for each category of data reviewed and the statistics are presented in tables by county with state totals. This publication continues "Key Facts," which was published between 1990 and 1994.

Contact: Voices for Utah Children, 747 East South Temple, Suite 100, Salt Lake City, UT 84102, Telephone: (801) 364-1182 Secondary Telephone: (877) 445-2447 Fax: (801) 364-1186 E-mail: karen@utahchildren.org Web Site: http://www.utahchildren.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child safety, Children, Data, Demographics, Education, Family economics, Health status, Socioeconomic factors, Utah

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2015. The health and well-being of children in rural areas: A portrait of the nation. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 61 pp. (The national survey of children's health)

Annotation: This chartbook presents data from the National Survey of Children's Health. Contents include indicators of the health and well-being of children, including oral health status; a discussion of supportive and risk factors in the family environment; and a discussion of aspects of neighborhoods that may support or threaten families and children on the national level within high-risk subpopulations for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Supplemental data tables on child health status, health care, school and activities, a child's family, and a child's and family's neighborhood are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Family economics, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health status, National surveys, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Risk factors, Rural population, Schools, Socioeconomic status, Statistical data

Iowa Department of Public Health. 2014–. Parentivity. Des Moines, Iowa Department of Health,

Annotation: This web-based community for parents provides personalized content to reduce family risks and optimize parenting resourcefulness, family resilience, child growth, and school readiness. The website is designed to recognize early warning signs of risk in areas of health, prenatal care, parenting skills, family functioning, and child development and will alert parents and recommend supportive resources and strategies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Iowa Department of Public Health, 321 East 12th Street, Des Moines, IA 50319-0075, Telephone: (515) 281-7689 Secondary Telephone: (866) 227-9878 E-mail: https://www.idph.iowa.gov/Contact-Us Web Site: http://www.idph.iowa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child development, Child health, Community development, Domestic violence, Family economics, Family support programs, Home visiting, Injury prevention, Parenting, Program coordination, Public private partnerships, School readinesss

Sell K, Zlotnik S, Noonan K, Rubin D. 2010. The effect of recession on child well-being: A synthesis of the evidence by PolicyLab, the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Washington, DC: First Focus, 41 pp.

Annotation: This research paper synthesizes evidence of the effects of recession on child well-being. It examines four domains – health, food security, housing stability, and maltreatment – and reviews the relationship of each to the well-being of children during periods of economic downturn. Included are key findings indicating that it can takes years for families to bounce back to their previous income levels after a recession but that public programs play a role in blunting the negative impacts.. The paper presents trend data over time and provides lessons learned from prior recessions in efforts to foster more informed policy making related to child well being.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Data, Economic factors, Family economics, High risk children, Housing, Nutrition, Policy development, Research, Trends

Bernard D, Banthin J. 2009. Family-level expenditures on health care and insurance premiums among the U.S. nonelderly population, 2006. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 24 pp. (MEPS research findings no. 29)

Annotation: This report uses estimates from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to examine family level expenditures on health care services and health insurance premiums in the U.S. across different health insurance plans and sizes of non-elderly families. The report includes extensive data tables.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Family economics, Health care costs, Health insurance, National surveys

Every Mother and Rich Winter Design and Multimedia. 2008. Business case for breastfeeding: Steps for creating a breastfeeding friendly worksite. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 1 resource kit (5 items)

Annotation: This 5-piece resource kit is intended for employers, human resource managers, expectant and new parents, and health professionals interested in encouraging businesses and public agencies to establish, maintain, and expand lactation support programs for their employees. The five components include 1) a business case for breastfeeding; 2) easy steps to supporting breastfeeding employees; 3) a toolkit with resources for building a lactation support program; 4) an employees guide to breastfeeding and working; and 5) an outreach marketing guide. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Business, Costs, Economics, Family support programs, Infant health, Policy development, Women's health, Working mothers, Workplace health promotion

Ruhm CJ. 2004. How well do parents with young children combine work and family life?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 23 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 10247)

Annotation: This report examines trends in labor force involvement, household structure, and some activities that may complicate the efforts of parents with young children to balance work and family life. It considers whether employer policies mitigate or exacerbate these difficulties and provides comparisons between U.S. policies and those of other industrialized countries, and it speculates on some possible sources and effects of the differences. Additional topics include changes in labor supply, time investments, employer benefits, family leave policies, maternal employment and child care. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures grouped together at the end of the report. The report also includes a reference list.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative policy, Child care, Employer benefits, Employer initiatives, Families, Family economics, Family leave, Family support, Work family issues, Working mothers, Working parents, Young children

Vogel CA, Boller K, Faerber J, Shannon JD, Tamis-LeMonda CS. 2003. Understanding fathering: The Early Head Start study of fathers of newborns. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on answering questions about (1) who low-income fathers are, (2) what their level of involvement with their families and children is, and (3) how and why involvement changes over time. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following chapters: (1) the study of fathers and newborns, (2) fathers' involvement with their children through the first year of life, (3) how fathers interact with their 6- and 14-month-old children, (4) factors associated with fathers' involvement with their children, and (5) summary, program recommendations, and next steps. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the report. Two appendices include analyses of father-child interactions at 6 and 14 months and lessons for data collection.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Early Head Start, Families, Family economics, Father child relations, Fathers, Head Start, Low income groups, Newborn infants, Parent participation, Research

Committee on the Consequences of Uninsurance; Institute of Medicine. 2002. Health insurance is a family matter. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 278 pp.

Annotation: This book analyzes the effects being uninsured can have on the health, finances, and general well-being of the family. It also examines the health of uninsured children and pregnant women to see whether they also receive less care and suffer worse health outcomes than those who are insured. Chapter topics include a discussion of what constitutes a family; how families obtain health insurance; how insurance transitions over the family life cycle; financial characteristics and behavior of uninsured families; family well-being and health insurance coverage and health-related outcomes for children, pregnant women, and newborns. The appendices include: (1) a conceptual framework for evaluating the consequences of uninsurance for families; (2) an overview of public health insurance programs; and (3) a review of research on access, utilization, and outcomes for children, pregnant women, and infants. An executive summary, conclusion section, and references are also provided.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 0-309-08518-7.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Family economics, Health insurance, Health insurance programs, Infants, Pregnant women, Uninsured persons

Better Homes Fund. 1999. Homeless children: America's new outcasts. Newton, MA: Better Homes Fund, 54 pp. (A public policy report)

Annotation: This report for policymakers and the media offers an account of the daily struggles of America's homeless children and their families and offers solutions, both short- and long-term. The report is divided into three parts. Part one address the effects of homelessness on children's physical and mental health, their families, and their struggle with school. Part two concentrates on the impact on society of large numbers of homeless children and families and the trend towards an increase in those numbers. Part three offers recommendations for immediate action in the areas of health, hunger, mental health, educational and vocational support, family separation, and violence prevention. Long-term recommendations discuss the need to develop an adequate supply of decent affordable housing and maximizing poor families' economic resources. The report concludes with endnotes, further readings, and appendices offering research methodology used and information about the Better Homes Fund.

Contact: Better Homes Fund, 181 Wells Avenue, Newton, MA 02459, Telephone: (617) 964-3834 Fax: (617) 244-1758 Web Site: http://www.tbhf.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-9672165-0-8.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Economic factors, Family economics, Homelessness, Housing, Hunger, Violence

Minkovitz CS, Baldwin KM, Silver GB. 1998. The social context of women's health. [Baltimore, MD]: Johns Hopkins University, Women's and Children's Health Policy Center, 4 pp. (Perinatal and women's health: issue summary; no. 1)

Annotation: This is a summary of a paper written to highlight policy and program areas needing to be addressed to ensure the continuous improvement of health care and services related to perinatal and women's health over the coming decade. The paper discusses population growth and composition by race and ethnicity of women, their educational attainment, employment, reproduction, family composition, household economic status, financial access to health care, and the caregiving role of women. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Employment, Family characteristics, Family economics, Policy development, Population dynamics, Program development, Reproduction, Women, Women's health

U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion. 1996-. Expenditures on children by families: annual report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, annual. (Miscellaneous publication; 1528)

Annotation: This report contains estimates on the costs of raising children; it includes estimates for traditional husband-wife and single-parent families. It is based on data derived from the 1990-1992 Consumer Expenditure Survey and other surveys, updated to the current year using the Consumer Price Index. It includes a discussion of the data and the methodology used to calculate the costs of child rearing as presented here. Estimates are presented by age of child, family income, and region of residence; categories of expenditures include housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, child care and education, and miscellaneous. Earlier editions of this report have been called "USDA Estimates of the Cost of Raising a Child."

Contact: U.S. Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 3101 Park Center Drive, Room 1034, Alexandria, VA 22302-1594, Telephone: (703) 305-7600 Fax: (703) 305-3300 E-mail: infocnpp@cnpp.usda.gov Web Site: http://www.cnpp.usda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child rearing, Family economics, Parents, Single parents, Statistics

Young KT, Davis K, Schoen C. 1996. The Commonwealth Fund survey of parents with young children. New York, NY: Commonwealth Fund, 132 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a survey taken of 2,000 families with children under three to determine how the health care system can help them insure the health and development of their children. The introduction describes the purpose and methodology of the survey, and presents and discusses the findings on these topics: early hospital discharge patterns, the promotion of breast feeding, the provision of information regarding early childhood development, parents' access to pediatric information and services, stress factors affecting child rearing, the role of parental emotional and mental health, financial pressures, and the parents' preparedness for parenting. Appendices provide profiles of selected parents; and survey charts, highlights, and data tables.

Contact: Commonwealth Fund, One East 75th Street, New York, NY 10021, Telephone: (212) 606-3800 Contact Phone: (212) 535-0400 Fax: (212) 606-3500 E-mail: info@cmwf.org Web Site: http://www.commonwealthfund.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Child rearing, Early childhood development, Family characteristics, Family economics, Financial support, Knowledge level, Length of stay, Parenting skills, Parents, Physician parent relations, Statistics, Surveys, Young children

Pollock S. 1996. Will the dollars stretch?: Teen parents living on their own—Virtual reality through stories and check-writing practice. Buena Park, CA: Morning Glory Press, 94 pp.

Annotation: This book uses four fictional scenarios to demonstrate some of the difficulties adolescent parents may encounter managing their family finances. Each scenario assumes the characters have limited incomes, and the book makes its points by having the reader maintain the character's checkbook in each scenario. The book explores the costs associated with caring for children when family finances are limited; it emphasizes the need for adolescents to make realistic life choices including delaying parenthood until they are financially prepared.

Contact: Morning Glory Press, 6595 San Haroldo Way, Buena Park, CA 90620-3748, Telephone: (888) 612-8254 Fax: (888) 327-4362 E-mail: info@morningglorypress.com Web Site: http://www.morningglorypress.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-885356-12-9.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Educational materials, Family economics, Fiction, Low income groups, Single mothers

Schmittroth L, ed. 1995. Statistical record of women worldwide. (2nd ed.). Detroit, MI: Gale Research, 1047 pp.

Annotation: This statistical summary presents data that reflect the condition of women, their lives, and their opportunities throughout the world. The preface describes the intent, methodology, and organization of the volume, and provides information on its use. It includes published and non-published data from governmental and non-governmental sources. The individual tables provide source information; a complete list of sources consulted is also included, and detailed indexes are provided. The range of topics covered are: attitudes and opinions; business and economics; crime, law enforcement, and legal justice; domestic life; education; health and medical care; income, spending, and wealth; labor, employment, and occupations; the military; population and vital statistics; public life; religion; sexuality; and sports and recreation.

Contact: Cengage Learning, P.O. Box 6904, Florence, KY 41022-6904, Telephone: (800) 354-9706 Fax: (800) 487-8488 E-mail: esales@cengage.com Web Site: http://www.cengage.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8103-8872-3.

Keywords: Attitudes, Business, Careers, Costs, Crime, Criminal justice system, Data, Demographics, Economic factors, Education, Employment, Family economics, Family income, Family life, Government, Health, Health services, International data, Labor, Law enforcement, Military, Political systems, Religion, Sex role, Sexuality, Sports, Vital statistics, Women, Women's rights

Phillips D, Bridgman A, eds., and Board on Children and Families. 1995. New findings on children, families, and economic self-sufficiency: Summary of a research briefing. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 30 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on how children are affected by changes in family income and how child care may influence families' efforts to attain self sufficiency. The report is organized around four questions: how do transitions into and out of welfare affect children's development; what role does child care play in parents' attempts to move toward self-sufficiency; do child care subsidies help or hinder low-income parents' efforts to work; and how does child care affect children's well-being? References and a bibliography are also included in this report.

Contact: Board on Children, Youth, and Families, National Research Council, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-1935 Contact Phone: (202) 334-1349 Fax: (202) 334-3584 E-mail: bocyf@nas.edu Contact E-mail: srelkin@nas.edu Web Site: http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bocyf/ Available at no charge.

Keywords: Child care, Child development, Family economics, Low income groups, Preschool children, Welfare reform

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health. 1995. Economics of reproductive and infant health: An annotated bibliography from 1980 to 1993. [Atlanta, GA?]: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Reproductive Health, 302 pp.

Annotation: This annotated bibliography contains abstracted articles and other references on cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness, cost utility, and related economic analyses. Topics include infant and child health; congenital anomalies, mental retardation, and chronic conditions; maternal health; family planning and women's reproductive health; nutrition; international health; and methods. The volume contains title, author, and subject indexes.

Contact: HathiTrust Digital Library, University of Michigan, Telephone: (734) 764-8016 E-mail: hathitrust-info@umich.edu Web Site: https://www.hathitrust.org/digital_library Available in libraries.

Keywords: Child health, Cost effectiveness, Economics, Family planning, Infant health, International health, Maternal health, Methods, Nutrition, Reproductive health

Schmittroth L, ed. 1994. Statistical record of children. Detroit, MI: Gale Research, 983 pp.

Annotation: This statistical summary provides data on a wide range of topics that relate to health and well-being of children to the age of 14. The focus is primarily on children in the United States, but international data are provided for selected topics. Data cover adolescents between the ages 12–17 for certain subjects. The broad categories included are: population; vital statistics; education; health, nutrition, and medical care; child care; income and expenditures; crimes, misdemeanors, and violence; domestic life; sports and recreation; and international comparisons. The intent, organization, and methodology for the publication is discussed in the preface. Sources of information are provided for each data table, and a complete list of sources consulted is also included.

Contact: Cengage Learning, P.O. Box 6904, Florence, KY 41022-6904, Telephone: (800) 354-9706 Contact Phone: (800) 877-4253 Fax: (800) 487-8488 E-mail: esales@cengage.com Web Site: http://www.cengage.com/ $99.00; no shipping and handling if prepaid. Document Number: ISBN 0-8103-9196-1.

Keywords: Child care, Children, Costs, Crime, Data, Demographics, Education, Family economics, Family income, Family life, Health, Health services, International data, Nutrition, Sports, United States, Violence, Vital statistics

National Research Council, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. 1993. Losing generations: Adolescents in high-risk settings. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 276 pp.

Annotation: This book is the consensus report of the National Research Council's Panel on High-Risk Youth. The report presents the panel's findings on deteriorating environmental factors that exacerbate adolescent risk behavior. The panel reviews the existing state of U.S. employment opportunities, family relations, neighborhood conditions, health care services, educational facilities, vocational counseling, and social systems as they impact on adolescents. The importance of community-based interventions and services is addressed in the context of the panel's findings.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Contact Phone: (800) 624-6242 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available in libraries.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Community based services, Cultural barriers, Culturally competent services, Education, Employment, Family economics, High risk populations, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Poverty, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics, Welfare services

Brandon PD. 1992. The determinants of market child care use among female-headed households. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, Institute for Research on Poverty, 28 pp. (Institute for Research on Poverty discussion paper; no. 985-92)

Annotation: This study tests whether the child care choices of female-headed households differ because the mechanisms leading to female-headship status are distinct, thereby differentially conditioning the set of child care choices and mothers' abilities to pay. The variables examined include marital status; economic constraints; kin networks; and work history. Data are drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 (NLS'72), in particular its fifth follow-up survey, conducted in 1986.

Contact: University of Wisconsin, Institute for Research on Poverty, Social Science Building, Room 3412 , 1180 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI 53706, Telephone: (608) 262-6358 Fax: (608) 265-3119 E-mail: djohnson@ssc.wisc.edu Web Site: http://www.irp.wisc.edu/ $3.50; prepayment required.

Keywords: Child care services, Economic factors, Family characteristics, Family economics, Followup studies, Longitudinal studies, Working mothers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.