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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (110 total).

Family Voices, IMPACT. n.d.. The Affordable Care Act (ACA): Prevention and health promotion for everybody!. Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, IMPACT, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document encourages families to partner with health professionals on getting preventive health services and to take a lead role in promoting health at home and where they live, work, and play. Topics include how information sharing between families and health professionals can promote child health, the Affordable Care Act's preventive health services for children, the Bright Futures initiative, and tips for a healthy lifestyle. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Family Voices, IMPACT, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.E., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-impact.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bright Futures, Child health, Children, Families, Family centered care, Health care reform, Health promotion, Parent professional relations, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Preventive health services, Public private partnerships, Special health care needs

CrossBear S, LeGore S. n.d.. Family involvement in child-serving systems and the need for cross-system collaboration. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief reviews what has been accomplished to date in the development of the family voice in all child-serving systems including substance abuse, mental health, child welfare, juvenile justice, trauma support, education, and primary care. The review indicates what needs to occur to create true cross-systems collaboration supporting family involvement, so that youth and their families can fully access the service and supports they need to obtain and maintain optimum health.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Collaboration, Families, Family centered care, Health care systems, Interagency cooperation, Parent professional relations, Service coordination, Service delivery systems

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health and Autism Speaks. 2016. Experience matters: A view into the health and wellbeing of US children and families with autism spectrum disorder. Baltimore, MD: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, 117 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook for families, advocates, policymakers, and researchers provides a national portrait of how children in the United States receive their diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), how their daily lives are impacted, and how their families are doing. Topics include the prevalence of ASD, diagnosing ASD, the child's health, health care and related services, school and social wellbeing, and coping with ASD. The appendices contain information on the ASD data presented in the chartbook including a glossary, a crosswalk of the data sources, methodological information, and guidance for accessing the data. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, E-mail: info@cahmi.org Web Site: https://childhealthdata.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents with special health care needs, Autism, Child health, Child with special health care needs, Coping, Data sources, Diagnosis, Early intervention services, Family health, Prevalence, Relationships, Special health care services, Statistical data

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Elementary school. Atlanta, GA: Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action planning component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Elementary schools, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health. 2014. School health index: A self-assessment and planning guide—Middle/high school. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1 v.

Annotation: This guide provides step-by-step instructions for creating a school health improvement plan. The guide is designed to help communities identify the strengths and weaknesses of school policies and programs for promoting health and safety; develop an action plan for improving student health and safety; and involve teachers, parents, students, and other community members in improving school policies, programs, and services. Contents include instructions for site coordinators, eight self-assessment modules, and an action plan component. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment; health education; physical education and other physical activity programs; nutrition services; school health services; school counseling, psychological, and social services; health promotion for staff; and family and community involvement.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Community action, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health promotion, High schools, Middle schools, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning, Safety, School age children, School counseling, School health, School health education, School health services, Social services, Students

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Intimate partner violence: Family resource brief (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and web sites about domestic violence, including rape, abuse, incest, teen dating, legal counsel, and services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Battered women, Bibliographies, Child abuse, Domestic violence, Electronic publications, Emotional abuse, Family relations, Family violence, Hotlines, Parent child relations, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse

National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships. 2014. Partnering with your child's provider. Albuquerque, NM: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, 6 pp. (Tips: Caring for a child with special health care needs)

Annotation: This fact sheet explains how families of children with special health care needs (CSHCN) can develop partnerships with their child's doctors and providers to improve health outcomes. It explains how to prepare for an office visit and how to communicate effectively with health providers. Included are resources to help families gather information and make decisions concerning treatment options for their child. The fact sheet also suggests ways to encourage families and providers to become involved in advocacy efforts. The fact sheet is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Communication, Family centered care, Parent professional relations, Provider participation, Spanish language materials

Agoratus L. 2014. Affordable Care Act (ACA): Why oral health is important for children with special health care needs and how to access it. Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, 2 pp. (ACA tip sheet)

Annotation: This tip sheet for parents of children with special health care needs provides information about the importance of good oral health care. Topics include finding oral health coverage, resources for families who do not have health insurance, and partnering with oral health professionals.

Contact: National Center for Family / Professional Partnerships, Family Voices, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.W., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-ncfpp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Dental care, Families, Family centered care, Health care reform, Health insurance, Oral health, Parent professional relations, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Special health care needs

National Association for the Education of Young Children. 2014. Program administrator's guide to evaluating safe sleep and SIDS reduction practices: Criterion 5.A.12. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help administrators of programs serving infants under age 12 months to focus program improvement efforts on safe sleep and SIDS risk reduction practices. Contents include instructions for administrators; a definition of SIDS and other infant deaths; linking research on SIDS to child care accreditation criteria; and reflective questions and optional related activities on observable safe sleep practices, ongoing monitoring plan, and collaboration with families. Myths and facts, tips on infant sleep hygiene, and related resources are included.

Contact: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1313 L Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 232-8777 Secondary Telephone: (800) 424-2460 Fax: (202) 328-1846 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.naeyc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Collaboration, Family professional relations, Infant death, Infants, Injury prevention, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Research, Resources for professionals, SIDS, Sleep position

Attendance Works. 2014. The power of positive connections: Reducing chronic absence through PEOPLE–Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement. [no place]: Attendance Works, 13 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides recommendations for schools and community partners for preventing chronic absence and outlines key steps for implementing a Priority Early Outreach for Positive Linkages and Engagement (PEOPLE) strategy. Topics include identifying students and families most at risk and helping them build positive relationships that promote regular attendance in conjunction with a broader approach to nurturing a school-wide culture of attendance. The appendix offers specific tips to help district, school, and community leaders advance the approach.

Contact: Attendance Works, Web Site: http://www.attendanceworks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Community action, Community participation, Family school relations, Family support, Outreach, Peer support programs, Policy development, Relationships, School age children, School attendance, Students

Hughes D. 2014. A review of the literature pertaining to family-centered care for children with special health care needs. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 32 pp.

Annotation: This document summarizes findings from a review of selected research related to family-centered care (FCC) for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Contents include highlights from studies that examine the following components of FCC: family-provider partnerships, coordinated care, racial/ethnic and linguistic barriers, and culturally competent care. It also examines access, unmet need and satisfaction for CSHCN and outcomes of FCC and medical homes.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Families, Family centered care, Health care delivery, Language barriers, Literature reviews, Parent professional relations, Service coordination, Special health care needs

Alliance for a Healthier Generation. 2014. Healthy Schools Program framework of best practices. New York, NY: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, 23 pp.

Annotation: This document describes complementary approaches to helping schools build healthier environments. Topics include school health and safety policies and environment, health education, physical education and other physical activity programs, nutrition services, health promotion staff, and family and community involvement. Through an assessment tool and a customized action plan, the framework is designed to help schools work toward the Alliance for Healthier Generation's National Healthy Schools Award.

Contact: Alliance for a Healthier Generation, c/o The Clinton Foundation, 1271 Avenue of the Americas, 42nd Floor, New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (888) KID-HLTH E-mail: info@HealthierGeneration.org Web Site: https://www.healthiergeneration.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community participation, Environmental health, Family school relations, Health education, Health promotion, Model programs, Nutrition services, Parent participation, Physical activity, Physical education, Policy development, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Workplace health promotion

Healthy Smiles, Healthy Children: The Foundation of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. 2014. Every child deserves a dental home. Chicago, IL: Healthy Smiles, Healthy Children: The Foundation of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) Foundation's vision, mission, planning objectives, shared accomplishments, progress made, and future plans. Topics include access to care grants, Dental Home Day, Leadership and Advanced Leadership Institutes, contributions, and AAPD member participation.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Foundation, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL 60611-2637, Telephone: (312) 337-2169 Fax: (312) 337-6329 E-mail: hshc@aapd.org Web Site: https://aapdfoundation.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Collaboration, Dental care, Family centered care, Financing, Grants, Leadership, Oral health, Participation, Pediatric care, Public private partnerships, Relationships

Schultz D, Reynolds KA, Sontag-Padilla LM, Lovejoy SL, Firth R, Pincus HA. 2013. Transforming systems for parental depression and early childhood developmental delays: Findings and lessons learned from the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children Initiative. [Santa Monica, CA]: Rand Corporation, 166 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the results of an evaluation of the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children Initiative of the Allegheny County Medical and Child Health Care Collaborative, an initiative to implement improvements to the local system of maternal and child health care. Report contents include an introduction to the initiative and its focus on maternal depression in low-income populations, system challenges, and a review of the need for a cross-system response in Allegheny County. Additional chapters discuss the methods for studying the initiative's framework, implementation, strategies, and evaluation; results and assessments on services, systems, and individuals; a discussion of lessons learned and limitations; as well as conclusions, recommendations, and next steps. Appendices include assessments, tools, outcome measure linkages, and reference studies.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-8330-7857-5.

Keywords: Case studies, Families, Family child relations, Health services delivery, Maternal mental health, Pennsylvania, Postpartum depression, Program evaluation, Screening

Nelson J, Yadrich D. 2013. Family caregivers of children with special health care needs: The need for caregiver support as truly family-centered care. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Leadership Education in Neurodevelpomental and Related Disabilities Program, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet presents information on the importance of family caregiver support to the health and well-being of children and adolescents with special health care needs and their families throughout the life course. Topics include caregiving and the life course, parent perspectives, and recommendations for health professionals. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Minnesota, Leadership Education in Neurodevelpomental and Related Disabilities Program, University of Minnesota, 103 Pattee Hall, 150 Pillsbury Drive, S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455, Telephone: (612) 624-6830 E-mail: fond0030@umn.edu Web Site: http://lend.umn.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Children with special health care needs, Family centered care, Family support services, Parent professional relations

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University and Brookings Institution. 2013. Military children and families. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 2 items. (The future of children; v. 23, no. 2, Fall 2013)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children explores subjects related to children and families of members of the U.S. military. Topics include economic conditions of families, children from birth through age 5, child care and other support programs, resilience among adolescents, how wartime military service affects children and families, how children are affected when a parent is injured or killed in combat, building communities of care, and recommendations for data and measurement. An executive summary and policy brief are also available.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Anxiety, Children, Families, Family support services, Military, Parent child relations, Resilience, Socioeconomic factors

Spielberger J, Winje C, Gitlow E. 2013. Evaluation of the Capable Kids and Families program: Year 2 findings. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 96 pp.

Annotation: This report provides findings from an 18-month evaluation to examine parent outcomes for families involved with the Community Partnership's Capable Kids and Families (CKF) program and for a comparison group of non CKF families who received services from other providers. CKF supports family functioning and fosters positive developmental outcomes for families raising children with disabilities or developmental delays from birth to age 6. The report discusses the following six broad domains: (1) understanding their child's strengths and needs, (2) helping their child learn and develop, (3) learning to advocate for their child, (4) support systems, (5) access to resources, and (6) positive interactions with their child. The report also provides information about the service experiences of CKF families and indicates other areas in which the CKF program could affect family well-being that could be explored in future research.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Family support services, Infants with developmental disabilities, Infants with special health care needs, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Program evaluation, Programs, Research, Service delivery systems

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2013. The health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native children: Parental report from the National Survey of Children's Health, 2007. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 77 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook presents indicators of the health and well-being of American Indian and Alaska Native children based on the perception of their parents or primary caregivers. Contents include indicators of child health status, health care use, school and activities, family, and neighborhood. National-, regional-, and state-level data are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Alaska Natives, American Indians, Children, Data, Environmental health, Family relations, Health care utilization, Health status, National surveys, Participation, Physical activity, School to work transition

National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health and SHAPE America. 2013. National framework for physical activity and physical education. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, 3 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a multi-component approach by which school districts and schools use all opportunities for students to be physically active; meet the nationally-recommended 60 minutes of physical activity each day; and develop the knowledge, skills, and confidence to be physically active for a lifetime. The document presents components of a comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) to include quality physical education as the foundation; physical activity before, during, and after school; staff involvement; and family and community engagement Resources to support CSPAPs such as cross-cutting documents, data sources, assessment and policy tools, and topical resources are also included.

Contact: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Population Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/NCCDPHP/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: After school programs, Community participation, Comprehensive programs, Family centered services, Family school relations, Interdisciplinary approach, Physical activity, Physical education, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Quality assurance, School age children, School districts, School health programs, Schools

National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2013. Results from the School Health Policies and Practices Study 2012. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 147 pp.

Annotation: This report provides state- and district-level data on each of the following eight components of the Coordinated School Health (CSH) model: health education, physical education, health services, mental health and social services, nutrition services, healthy and safe school environment, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement. Screenings, notifications, and referrals for oral health problems are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community participation, Data sources, Family school relations, Health education, Health services, Mental health, Nutrition services, Physical education, Policy analysis, Prevalence, Prevention programs, Safety, School age children, School health, School health programs, Schools, Social services, Trends, Workplace health promotion

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.