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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (59 total).

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2015. The health and well-being of children in rural areas: A portrait of the nation. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 61 pp. (The national survey of children's health)

Annotation: This chartbook presents data from the National Survey of Children's Health. Contents include indicators of the health and well-being of children, including oral health status; a discussion of supportive and risk factors in the family environment; and a discussion of aspects of neighborhoods that may support or threaten families and children on the national level within high-risk subpopulations for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Supplemental data tables on child health status, health care, school and activities, a child's family, and a child's and family's neighborhood are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Family economics, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health status, National surveys, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Risk factors, Rural population, Schools, Socioeconomic status, Statistical data

Redd Z, Sacks VH, Anderson Moore K, Gooze R. 2015. Poor, unemployed, and not on welfare: A statistical look at "disconnected families". Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 11 pp.

Annotation: This research brief uses data from the 2011/12 National Survey of Children's Health to provide a statistical look at children in disconnected families in the United States. The brief defines disconnected families as those households with at least one child (from birth to age 17), a household income at or below the federal poverty level, and with the following additional characteristics: (1) no one reported receiving cash assistance or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in the prior 12 months, and (2) no one was employed for at least 50 of the prior 52 weeks. Topics include demographic characteristics, receipt of other public assistance programs, family functioning, and parents' health status. The analysis compares children in disconnected families with children in other poor families, and with all children in families nationally.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Family characteristics, Family health, Health status, Low income groups, Public assistance, Statistical data

Sacks VH, Sticklor L, Murphey D, Anderson Moore K. 2015. Poor, unemployed, and not on welfare: The prevalence of "disconnected families" by state. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 9 pp.

Annotation: This research brief uses data from the 2011/12 National Survey of Children’s Health to quantify the population of children in disconnected families in each state, and to describe the extent to which these families access other public assistance programs. The brief defines disconnected families as those households with at least one child (from birth to age 17), a household income at or below the federal poverty level, and with the following additional characteristics: (1) no one reported receiving cash assistance or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families in the prior 12 months, and (2) no one was employed for at least 50 of the prior 52 weeks.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Family characteristics, Family health, Health status, Low income groups, Public assistance, Statistical data

Children's Defense Fund. 2014. The state of America's children. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, irregular.

Annotation: This series of reports is a compilation and analysis of national and U.S. state-by-state data on child population, child poverty, family structure, family income, housing and homelessness, hunger and nutrition, health, early childhood, education, child welfare, juvenile justice, and gun violence. Changes in key child and national well-being indicators are included.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child nutrition, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Education, Ethnic groups, Family characteristics, Gun violence, High risk groups, Population surveillance, Poverty, Trends

Tower CC. 2014. Understanding child abuse and neglect. (9th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 442 pp.

Annotation: This textbook covers a range of topics associated with child abuse and neglect. It provides an overview on the problem, considers the rights and responsibilities of parents and children, and reviews the effects of abuse and neglect on the development of children. Individual chapters cover physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, and neglect. Other chapters examine ways to prevent or intervene in abusive situations through the judicial system and consider treatment methodologies including the use of foster care. The book also includes a chapter on adults who were abused as children but who had not reported the fact.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Children's rights, Emotional abuse, Families, Family characteristics, Foster care, Incest, Intervention, Legal issues, Parent rights, Parenting, Physical abuse, Prevention, Sexual abuse, Social work

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. 2014. At a glance for 2014: America's children–Key national indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, biennial.

Annotation: This document presents statistics based on national indicators of child well-being in the United States. Topics include demographic background, family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health.

Contact: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, E-mail: childstats@ed.gov Web Site: http://childstats.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child safety, Children, Data, Family characteristics, Measures, Social indicators, Statistics, Trends

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. 2014. America's young adults: Special issue, 2014. Washington, DC: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 84 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the demographic characteristics and well-being of young adults (ages 18-24) against a backdrop of the traditional milestones of adulthood including education; economic circumstances; family formation; civic, social, and personal behavior; and health and safety. Topics include characteristics of young adults, the current opportunities and challenges they face, and the implications of possible trajectories for their futures and their families.

Contact: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, E-mail: childstats@ed.gov Web Site: http://childstats.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Family characteristics, Life course, Social indicators, Statistics, Transitions, Trends, Young adults

Child Care Aware of America. 2014. Child care in America: 2014 state fact sheets. Arlington, VA: Child Care Aware of America, annual.

Annotation: This annual report provides federal and national data and information from state child care resource and referral agencies (CCR&Rs) and other state agencies to look at family characteristics, the child care pattern and supply, the cost of child care, the child care work force, and the quality of child care. The report documents the need for and use of child care as a nation, and lists facts about individual states and the District of Columbia.

Contact: Child Care Aware of America, 1515 North Courthouse Road, 11th Floor, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 424-2246 Secondary Telephone: (866) 278-9428 E-mail: http://childcareaware.org/contact-us Web Site: http://childcareaware.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Child care centers, Children, Costs, Family characteristics, Licensing, Quality assurance, State programs, Statistical data, Work force

Wilder Research. 2014. 2012 Minnesota Homeless Study: Homeless children and their families. Saint Paul, MN: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on children and their families who are homeless or living in temporary housing programs in Minnesota. Contents include trends on the number of families who are homeless and the number of people in families in sheltered and unsheltered settings. Additional topics include ages of children who are homeless; race and ethnicity of parents who are homeless; children's health, nutrition, and mental health; children's education; parent's housing history and access to housing; parent health and disabilities; and employment and income of parents. A discussion of the need for affordable housing and supportive services is included.

Contact: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation, 451 Lexington Parkway North, Saint Paul, MN 55104, Telephone: (651) 280-2000 Web Site: http://www.wilder.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Health status, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Housing, Learning, Minnesota, Parents, School attendance, Shelters, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

Padilla-Frausto I, Grant D, Aydin M, Aguilar-Gaxiola S. 2014. Three out of four children with mental health needs in California do not receive treatment despite having health care coverage. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information on the mental health needs of children ages 4 to 11 in California, based on data from the 2007 and 2009 California Health Interview Survey. Contents include data on children's and parents' sociodemographic characteristics and children's use of mental health services. Policy implications and recommendations are included.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Children, Family characteristics, Health care utilization, Mental health, Service delivery systems, State surveys, Statistical analysis

Braverman P, Egerter S, Arena K, Aslam R. 2014. Early childhood experiences shape health and well-being throughout life. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief explains how economic and social conditions early in life shape children's health and development, affecting their health as adults; the evidence connecting early childhood programs with health; what works, apart from the need for services for parents; the business case for investing in early childhood programs; and examples of high-quality early childhood programs. A table highlighting several early childhood programs and the ways they affect health is included.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Family characteristics, Health status, Life course, Model programs, Quality assurance, Socioeconomic status, Young children

Moore KA, Sacks VH. 2014. Profiles of adolescents who are not in good health. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 13 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief uses data from the 2011/2012 National Survey of Children's Health to examine the characteristics of adolescents whose parents rated their health as fair or poor, and compares those with the characteristics of adolescents who are described by their parents to be in better health. Contents include findings on adolescent health status by state and by race/ethnicity. The brief also presents information on the characteristics of adolescents' families and neighborhoods by adolescent health status. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Comparative analysis, Ethnic factors, Family characteristics, Family income, Health insurance, Health status, Individual characteristics, Neighborhoods, Special health care needs, Weight

Carroll L, Vickers M. 2013. Translating life course messages into family-friendly language. Albuquerque, NM: Family Voices, IMPACT, 1 p.

Annotation: This poster describes a study to translate life course health development knowledge and research into messages that are meaningful to and empowering for families. Contents include a problem statement and information about the study's aims, approach, methods, and findings. Topics include barriers faced by families, family characteristics, and take home messages. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Family Voices, IMPACT, 3701 San Mateo Boulevard, N.E., Suite 103, Albuquerque, NM 87110, Telephone: (505) 872-4774 Secondary Telephone: (888) 835-5669 Fax: (505) 872-4780 Web Site: http://www.fv-impact.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Communication, Families, Family characteristics, Life course, Research

Children's Defense Fund. 2012. The state of America's children handbook. Washington, DC: Children's Defense Fund, 55 pp.

Annotation: This report presents key data on the health and well being of children across the United States. It provides information and statistics in areas such as child nutrition, poverty, family income, housing, health status, education, and juvenile justice, and presents tables that compare how children are faring in each state. Included are statistics based on the age, race, and ethnicity of children. Comparisons between the state of children in America and those in other industrialized nations are also provided. The report is intended to help inform and enable those who care about children to effectively stand up and advocate for them.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child health, Child nutrition, Child welfare, Child welfare, Data, Early childhood development, Education, Family characteristics, Gun violence, High risk groups, Population surveillance, Poverty, Statistics

Murphey D, Cooper M, Moore KA. 2012. Children living with and cared for by grandparents: State-level data from the American Community Survey. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 3 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This brief examines recent trends, national and for each state, related to children who reside in their grandparents' household. In addition to presenting data in tabular form about children living with grandparent householder and children whose grandparents have primary responsibility for care in 2005-2007 and 2008-2010, the brief provides an overview and discusses variations by state. Information about the data used is included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family characteristics, Grandparents, Statistical data, Trends

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2010. Fragile families. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 3 items. (The future of children; v. 20, no. 2, Fall 2010)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children explores the complexity of fragile families, defined as families in which the parents are unwed at the time of the child's birth. Some of the research described in the volume is based on a large national survey, the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. The first four articles examine fragile families from various vantage points: the couple, the father, and the child. The fifth looks at particular issues of race and ethnicity. The last four delve into policy issues that have special pertinence for fragile families: pregnancy prevention, incarceration, postsecondary education, and marriage and fatherhood programs. An executive summary and policy brief are also available.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Family characteristics, Family support programs, Marital status, Premarital pregnancy, Public policy

Heckman JJ, Masterov DV. 2007. The productivity argument for investing in young children. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, ca. 100 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 13016)

Annotation: This paper presents the case for investing more in young American children who grow up in disadvantaged environments. It discusses early intervention efforts and their impact on adverse environments and their role in reversing some of the harm of disadvantage and having a high economic return. Topics include human capital and economic performance, crime, education, trends in children's home environments and the consequences of adverse environments, the importance of cognitive and noncognitive ability in early economic life, evidence from enriched preschool programs, and the case for early intervention. References are provided along with footnotes and statistical information provided in tables and figures.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adverse effects, Case studies, Cognitive development, Crime, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Educational factors, Family characteristics, Low income groups, Preschool children, Program descriptions, Social policy, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data, Young children

Terry-Humen E, Manlove J, Moore KA. 2005. Playing catch-up: How children born to teen mothers fare. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This paper, part of the Putting What Works to Work project, explores the complex relationship between the age at which a woman has a child and how her child fares. Two primary areas are discussed: (1) what is the magnitude of differences on measures of development between children born to adolescent mothers aged 17 and younger and children born to older women; and (2) what differences between the kindergarten children remain after taking into account characteristics of the child, the mother, and the household. Topics addressed include differences in child, family, and mother's background characteristics by age of mother; differences among children by age of mother at first birth; cognition and knowledge and language and communications differences in children born to adolescent mothers. The report is divided into the following sections: summary, introduction, key findings, research to date, data, sample, measures, methods, results, discussion, conclusion, and literature cited. Statistical information is provided in charts and tables throughout the paper.

Contact: National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy = Power to Decide, 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 478-8500 Fax: (202) 478-8588 E-mail: campaign@teenpregnancy.org Web Site: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-58671-053-2.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Ethnic factors, Family characteristics, Infant health, Language development, Maternal age, Racial factors, Socioeconomic factors, Statistics

Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. 2004–. America's children in brief: Key national indicators of well-being. Washington, DC: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, biennial.

Annotation: This series of briefs summarize select national indicators of children's well-being and changes in these indicators over time. Each brief describes the context in which children live (such as family settings and living arrangements), improvements in children's well-being, and areas in which there has been less progress. Topics include family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health. Statistical data are presented in tables and figures throughout the report, and additional data are available from the website. The series is published biennially as a companion to America's Children: Key National Indicators of Well-being, which is published in alternating years. A summary of all indicators in the larger report are included in each brief.

Contact: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, E-mail: childstats@ed.gov Web Site: http://childstats.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Demographics, Family characteristics, Statistics, Trends

Hodgkinson HL. 2003. Leaving too many children behind: A demographer's view on the neglect of America's youngest children. Washington, DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, 17 pp.

Annotation: Using demographic data on children ages 5 and under, this paper examines forces like poverty and family instability and how they work to prevent equal opportunity in school and in life. The paper presents some programs and techniques that effectively reduce the effects of these forces, and it concludes with recommendations for increasing the nation's concern for improving the quality of infant and child care and for making high-quality programs available for all infants and young children. The paper concludes with a bibliography.

Contact: Institute for Educational Leadership, 4301 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 100, Washington, DC 2008-2304, Telephone: (202) 822-8405 Fax: (202) 872-4050 E-mail: iel@iel.org Web Site: http://www.iel.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child advocacy, Child care, Child care, Child development, Demography, Economic factors, Equal opportunities, Family characteristics, Family relations, Infant care, Poverty, Preschool children, School readiness, Schools, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.