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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (69 total).

MetroHealth Medical Center, Pediatric Service Coordination Program. n.d.. Working with your health insurance. Cleveland, OH: MetroHealth Medical Center, Pediatric Service Coordination Program, 16 pp.

Annotation: This booklet provides information and forms to help families work with their health insurance companies. It includes questions to ask the insurance company and billing office, tips for keeping records of bills and claims, and who to talk with for assistance. A glossary of terms and list of publications on health insurance are included. Resource organizations in Cuyahoga County and the state of Ohio are also listed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family centered, community based care, Health care financing, Insurance, Medical records

National Maternal and Child Health Resource Center. n.d.. A national goal: Building service delivery systems for children with special health care needs and their families—Family centered community based coordinated care. Iowa City, IA: National Maternal and Child Health Resource Center, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the elements of a family-centered, community-based system for delivering health care for children with special health needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHF061.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family centered community based care

Nelson R. n.d.. Analysis and Expansion of Community-Based Interagency Collaborative Efforts: [Final report]. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa, 51 pp.

Annotation: This study sought to document, evaluate, and disseminate information about two community-based projects designed as models of collaborative interagency service provision for children and families. The project developed a set of recommendations for collaborative efforts, addressing procedure as well as policy and organization. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152890.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Community-Based Health Care, Family centered, Fragmentation of Services, Health Professionals, Interagency cooperation, community based care

Nicol P. n.d.. Coordinated Community-Based Services: [Final report]. Frankfort, KY: Division of Maternal and Child Health, Department for Health Services, Kentucky Cabinet for Human Resources, 39 pp.

Annotation: The principle aim of this project was to demonstrate a coordinated, community-based program model for the screening, evaluation, and treatment of children from birth to five years of age with developmental disabilities, children at risk for them, and for their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152932.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Developmental disorders, Early intervention, Family centered care, Interagency cooperation, community based care

Pratt S. n.d.. Montana Project for Children with Special Health Care Needs [Final report]. Helena, MT: Montana Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, 16 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of this project was to develop a replicable system of family-centered, community-based case management for children with special health care needs in a frontier State. Targeted communities were under 20,000 in population and served areas at least 50 miles from a level II facility. The project objectives were to: (1) Upgrade case management and assessment skills of local public health nurses; (2) develop family-centered, community-based case management programs that address the needs of the family and the child with special needs; and (3) develop community-based teams that empower families to actively participate in identifying and meeting educational, social, psychological, health, and financial needs for themselves and the child with special needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158640.

Keywords: Case Management, Chronically Ill, Community-Based Health Care, Education of Health Professionals, Families, Family-Centered Health Care, Public Health Nurses, Rural Populations

Danielson C. n.d.. Healthy Foundations [Final report]. Des Moines, IA: Iowa Department of Public Health, 51 pp.

Annotation: The project's goals were to: (1) Develop and implement structures and processes in defined community areas to plan and implement a family-centered, community-based health care delivery system for children; (2) develop data system capacity and function statewide to ensure family-centered, community-based primary care services for children; and (3) share experiences in family-centered, community-based system change in the area of primary health care for children with other State, regional, and national maternal and child health providers. At the State level, strategies were directed toward developing a system of children's primary health care delivery that was family centered and community based. At the local level, child health steering committees in established projects were to continue to plan and implement child health system changes in their service areas. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Child Mortality, Community Based Health Services, Databases, Family Centered Health Care, Information Systems, Primary Care, Standards of Care, State Programs

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2017. National Title V children and youth with special health care needs program profile. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 15 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a snapshot of Title V Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CYSHCN) programs across the United States. Contents include background and history of CYSHCN programs, recent changes affecting CYSHCN programs, and methods and results from an electronic survey of Title V CYSHCN directors to assess key characteristics of each state's CYSHCN program. Topics include program structure and strengths, roles in systems of care, CYSHCN program partnerships, financing of care for CYSHCN populations and emerging issues for CYSHCN programs.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Consultation, Cultural competency, Data, Family centered care, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Health care systems, Health insurance, Leadership, Medicaid managed care, Models, Networking, Pediatric care, Policy development, Program coordination, Program development, Public health infrastructure, Public private partnerships, Quality assurance, Reimbursement, Role, Standards, State MCH programs, Title V programs

Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability. 2013. Autism plan for Georgia. Atlanta, GA: Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a plan for improving access to comprehensive, coordinated health care and related services for children, youth, and adults with autism spectrum disorder and related developmental disabilities in Georgia. The plan addresses the following ten areas of activity: early identification and screening; referral and diagnosis; medical, behavioral health, and dental services; family support; early intervention and preschool services; elementary and secondary education; community services and supports; transition from youth to adult systems; adult services and supports; and emergency preparedness and first responders. For each area, the report provides a definition, quality indicators (problem statements and data drivers), and recommendations (objectives). The report also describes foundational supports considered in developing the recommendations including work force, awareness, informational resources, finances, and policy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Georgia State University School of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 75 Piedmont Avenue, Suite 514, Atlanta, GA 30303, Telephone: (404) 413-1281 Fax: (404) 413-1012 E-mail: cld@gsu.edu Web Site: https://disability.publichealth.gsu.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Autism, Community based services, Comprehensive health care, Diagnosis, Disaster planning, Early intervention, Educational objectives, Family centered care, Family support services, Financial planning, Georgia, Health care delivery, Life course, Policy development, Program coordination, Referrals, Screening, Special health care needs, State programs, Systems development, Transition planning, Work force

Francisco VT, Cook GB, Sienkiewicz HC, Benhammou M, Langston K, Poillot-Micca M, Wilson S, Sanderson M, Matula D, Tant C. 2011. Promoting community engagement for systems improvement for children and youth with special health care needs: An action planning guide for community-based initiatives (rev. ed.). Greensboro, NC: University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Community Leadership and Mobilization Research Team; Raleigh, NC: North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, Children and Youth Branch, 102 pp.

Annotation: This monograph describes the Innovative Approaches (IA) initiative to put North Carolina children, including children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) and their families on a positive trajectory to success. It discusses improvement for community-wide systems of care that will effectively meet the needs of families of CYSHCN resulting in increased family satisfaction with services received and improved outcomes for this population. Topics include action planning, gathering background data and information about CYSHCN and their families, preparing the action plan, prioritizing systems change, and documenting progress and promoting renewal.

Contact: University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Health Education, 437 HHP Building,, P.O. Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402-617, Telephone: (336) 334-5532 Fax: (336) 256-1158 E-mail: maloten2@uncg.edu Web Site: http://uncg.edu/phe

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Community based services, Family centered services, North Carolina, Program planning, Special health care needs, State programs

Bryson C. [2002]. Children with serious emotional disturbance and managed care: Final report. Nashville, TN: Tennessee Voices for Children, 40 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes the Tennessee project to study the TennCare Partners Program, the mental health arm of Tennessee's public managed care program, and how families with children who are severely emotionally disturbed were under-served by the program. Topics also include ways to promote parent-professional interagency planning to meet the needs of children with serious emotional disturbance and their families, and to increase their access to a community-based, family-centered, culturally competent continuum of services. Report sections include an abstract, the project narrative including the purpose, goals, and objectives; methodology; evaluation; results and conclusions; a list of publications and products generated from the project; dissemination and utilization of results; future plans and follow-up; and types and amount of support and resources needed to replicate the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Tennessee Voices for Children, 701 Bradford Avenue, Nashville, TN 37204, Telephone: (615) 269-7551 Fax: (615) 269-8914 E-mail: TVC@tnvoices.org Web Site: http://www.Tnvoices.org

Keywords: Access to health care, Affective disorders, Child mental health, Community based services, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Family centered services, Final reports, MCH research, Managed care, Mental disorders, Parent professional relations, Program evaluation, Service integration, Tennessee

Gittler J. [2002]. Alternative dispute prevention and resolution for children with special health care needs and their families in managed care settings: Final report. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa, National Maternal and Child Health Resource Center, 40 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes a national program to promote fair, timely, and cost-effective methods of preventing and resolving conflicts in obtaining needed health care services between children with special health care needs (CSHCN) and their families, service providers, and managed care organizations. The project is designed to help CSHCN obtain services that are community-based, comprehensive, coordinated, family-centered, and culturally competent. The report sections include the purpose of the project, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, results and outcomes, publications and products, dissemination and utilization, future plans and follow-up, and type and amount of support and resources needed to replicate the project. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Health Law and Policy Resource Center, University of Iowa, 412 Boyd Law Building, Melrose and Byington Streets, Iowa City, IA 52242-1113, Telephone: (319) 335-9067 Fax: (319) 335-9098 E-mail: law-nhlp@uiowa.edu Web Site: http://blogs.law.uiowa.edu/nhlp

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Cultural competence, Cultural sensitivity, Dispute resolution, Families, Family centered services, Final reports, Health personnel, MCH research, Managed care, Mediation, Service integration

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2002. All aboard the 2010 Express: A 10-year action plan for children with special health care needs and their families—Draft. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 48 pp.

Annotation: This draft document presents a blueprint for the organization, financing, and delivery of family-centered services for children and youth with special health care needs in a national program called "All Aboard the 2010 Express." It sets forth a framework for effective partnerships between families and professionals; among professions; between the private healthcare system and public health; among agencies and officials at the federal, state, and community levels; and among public agencies, businesses, and voluntary organizations in the private sector. The report also discusses how to measure program success, how to develop a successful plan, six goals, and three action steps. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Secondary Telephone: (301) 945-9842 Contact Phone: (301) 443-2350 Contact E-mail: GWeissman@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://mchb.hrsa.gov/maternal-child-health-topics/children-and-youth-special-health-needs Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Family centered services, Federal initiatives, Health care delivery, Health care financing, Healthy People 2010, National programs, Public private partnerships

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. [2001]. All aboard the 2010 Express: A 10-year action plan for children with special health care needs and their families. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brochure summarizes a new initiative called the 2010 Express, which is sponsored by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau for children with special health care needs. Included is a history of the new model of care for these children, a new definition of children with special health care needs, a plan of action, and a list of the six core goals around which the plan is organized. Also included is information on the national summit to discuss this initiative as well as a call for partners.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Family centered services, Federal initiatives, Health care delivery, Health care financing, Healthy People 2010, National programs, Public private partnerships

Communities Can. 1999-. Communities of excellence. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, annual.

Annotation: These booklets focus on the efforts of the Federal Interagency Coordinating Council (FICC) and the Communities Can program, a program that recognizes outstanding communities nationwide for their success in serving children, including children with disabilities, and their families. Each booklet features stories about five Communities of Excellence selected in each year in which families who need services receive these services without undue difficulties and without a long search. The stories describes how the members of these communities made great progress toward improving service delivery for children and families. In addition, each booklet provides an overview of the program, explains the mechanics behind the Communities of Excellence awards, and discusses the quest for further improvement. Each booklet includes one appendix: more about the FICC. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Children with special health care needs, Community programs, Families, Family centered community based care, High risk children, Model programs, National programs

Bronheim SM, Keefe ML, Morgan CC. 1998. Building blocks of a community-based system of care: The Communities Can experience. (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Center, 98 pp.

Annotation: This revised report focuses on the details of how individual communities can realize the vision of providing family-centered, community-based, coordinated care for children with special health needs and their families. The first section describes some general strategies learned from 14 localities honored in the Communities Can Campaign. Section two describes each of the four major components and provides examples of a community-based system of care designated by Communities Can. The final section includes resources to help a community move toward making community-based care for children with special health care needs and their families a reality. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5503 Secondary Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: gucdc@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchd.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Community programs, Family centered care, Health care systems, Health services delivery, Service coordination

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. 1997. Beyond the 4th dimension: Assuring quality health care for moms and babies—Proceedings of the scientific summit. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report represents the proceedings of a scientific summit whose purpose was to summarize the state of the art research on early discharge of mothers and infants from the hospitals after the infant's birth and to identify evidence-based and outcomes-focused steps to strengthen America's families. The summit was divided into three panels (maternal, infant, and family) and the report reviews what issues were discussed in each. A review of the current scientific literature is provided as are ethical and legislative perspectives. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHJ108.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Child health services, Community based services, Evidence based medicine, Family centered services, Home visiting, Length of stay, Managed care, Maternal health services, Neonatal care, Newborn infants, Patient discharge, Pediatric care, Postpartum care, Postpartum care, Pregnancy

Bishop KK, Taylor MS, Arango P, eds. 1997. Partnerships at work: Lessons learned from programs and practices of families, professionals and communities. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont, 135 pp.

Annotation: This book gives information on culturally sensitive family- and community-centered care for children with special health care needs. It presents the case of a family with multiple needs and ways the family built partnerships with various providers of health care and education services. Examples of community-based programs in New Mexico, Minnesota, and Texas are given. Also included are chapters on applying lessons learned and on recommendations for implementing changes. Appendices include a suggested reading list, information on the National Commission on Leadership in Interprofessional Education, principles of family/professional collaboration, key elements of family-centered care, fundamentals of cultural competence, and a list of Project Unity members. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Vermont, Partnerships for Change, Department of Social Work, 228 Waterman Building, Burlington, VT 05405, Telephone: (802) 656-1156 Fax: (802) 656-8565 E-mail: kbishop@zoo.uvm.edu Web Site: http://www.partnershipsforchange.com/ Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHL101.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Community based services, Community health services, Cultural sensitivity, Culturally competent services, Family centered services, Parents with special health care needs, Social service agencies

Ray K., Farley MS, Gray WT, Johnson G, Ray RD. 1997. Comprehensive services for HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns: Seven case studies. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care, 151 pp.

Annotation: This document identifies and discusses successful HIV program grantees that provide services to HIV-infected pregnant women and their newborns. Researchers have used a case study method to focus on programs that have in common coordinated, comprehensive, and quality patient care. These case studies identify models of effective care delivery and program components that could be replicated or adapted to other locations. References and the case study protocol are included at the end of the report.

Contact: HathiTrust Digital Library, University of Michigan, Telephone: (734) 764-8016 E-mail: hathitrust-info@umich.edu Web Site: https://www.hathitrust.org/digital_library Available from Hathitrust via participating libraries. Document Number: 99-0056-P.

Keywords: Barriers, Case management, Case studies, Community based services, Comprehensive care, Data collection, Early intervention, Evaluation, Family centered care, HIV infected patients, Health services delivery, High risk infants, High risk pregnancy, Interviews, Model programs, Multidisciplinary teams, Newborns

Brady C. 1996 (ca.). Substance abusing women: The ultimate home visiting challenge—A report on the University of Florida MIC Project Resource Mothers Program. Gainesville, FL: University of Florida, Maternity and Infant Care Project, 23 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the history of the first 5 years of the Maternity and Infant Care Resource Mothers Project at the University of Florida. The project was developed as part of a prenatal care delivery system that provides services in several counties. The project offers family-centered, community-based services through paraprofessional home visitors working with preconceptional, pregnant, and postpartum substance-using women. The report provides an overview of the area served; describes the components of the program, the resource mothers, the women served, the results to date, and program costs and benefits; and summarizes the lessons learned. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Florida, Maternity and Infant Care Project, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 15 South East First Avenue, Suite A, Gainesville, FL 32601, Telephone: (904) 392-4491 Contact Phone: (352) 392-4491 $5.00.

Keywords: Community based services, Drug affected infants, Family centered services, Home visiting, Infant health, Maternal health, Outreach, Perinatal care, Prenatal care, Program descriptions, Substance abusing mothers, Substance abusing pregnant women

Taylor TD, Brown MC. 1996. Young children and their families who are homeless: A university affiliated program's response. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Child Development Center, Center for Child Health and Mental Health Policy, 51 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a University Affiliated Program initiative which targets the developmental needs of children from birth to five years of age who are homeless and the services provided to their families. The intended audience includes state and national policy makers. Topics include: two District of Columbia based projects, Kidstart and Knock On Every Door; an approach for identification and referral of homeless children who present developmental delays and disabilities; successful interventions and barriers to access to services; and recommendations for advocacy and policy development within the developmental disabilities network. The report includes references.

Keywords: Access to health care, Barriers, Children with special health care needs, Community based services, Developmental screening, District of Columbia, Early childhood development, Early intervention programs, Family centered care, Homeless persons, Preschool children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.