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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 15 (15 total).

Nelson R. n.d.. Analysis and Expansion of Community-Based Interagency Collaborative Efforts: [Final report]. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa, 51 pp.

Annotation: This study sought to document, evaluate, and disseminate information about two community-based projects designed as models of collaborative interagency service provision for children and families. The project developed a set of recommendations for collaborative efforts, addressing procedure as well as policy and organization. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152890.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Community-Based Health Care, Family centered, Fragmentation of Services, Health Professionals, Interagency cooperation, community based care

Johnson C. n.d.. Making It Work for Children with Special Needs: The Family, the Community, the State [Final report]. Morgantown, WV: W. G. Klingberg Center for Child Development, 17 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to improve the overall system of health care delivery for West Virginia children with special health needs. Specific goals were to: (1) Provide individualized family empowerment training with specific emphasis on skills in case management; (2) strengthen the Handicapped Children's Services system of case management; (3) provide coordinated, comprehensive medical and educational evaluations for children with special health needs; (4) establish a movement recognizing parents as equal partners within the professional team; (5) enhance networking through a parent-provider interdisciplinary, interagency conference; (6) identify a primary medical home for every child with special health needs; (7) emphasize the role of the primary care physician as a member of the community team; (8) assure continuation of the project beyond the funding period; and (9) expand services to all children with special health needs in West Virginia. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121867.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, Case Management, Children with Special Health care Needs, Families, Family Professional Collaboration, Interagency Cooperation, Medical Home, PL 99-457, Parent Professional Communication, Parents, Primary Care, Service Coordination

CrossBear S, LeGore S. n.d.. Family involvement in child-serving systems and the need for cross-system collaboration. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief reviews what has been accomplished to date in the development of the family voice in all child-serving systems including substance abuse, mental health, child welfare, juvenile justice, trauma support, education, and primary care. The review indicates what needs to occur to create true cross-systems collaboration supporting family involvement, so that youth and their families can fully access the service and supports they need to obtain and maintain optimum health.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child welfare, Collaboration, Families, Family centered care, Health care systems, Interagency cooperation, Parent professional relations, Service coordination, Service delivery systems

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health. 2017. The HRSA strategy to address intimate partner violence 2017-2020. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health, 53 pp.

Annotation: This document presents the Health Resources and Services Administration’s (HRSA’s) Office of Women’s Health’s agency-wide collaborative initiative that puts into practice a strategy to address intimate partner violence (IPV). The document is organized into four priority areas describing how HRSA employees can address IPV: (1) train the health care and public health work force to address IPV, (2) develop partnerships, (3) increase access to high-quality IPV-informed health care, and (4) address gaps in knowledge about IPV. For each priority area, objectives, activities, and key outcomes are presented, and lead agencies and collaborators are identified.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Office of Women's Health, Parklawn Building, Room 18-46, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-8664 Fax: (301) 443-8587 E-mail: smatoff-stepp@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/WomensHealth Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Family violence, Federal initiatives, Professional training: Access to health care, Women’s health

National Association for the Education of Young Children. 2014. Program administrator's guide to evaluating safe sleep and SIDS reduction practices: Criterion 5.A.12. Washington, DC: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 8 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help administrators of programs serving infants under age 12 months to focus program improvement efforts on safe sleep and SIDS risk reduction practices. Contents include instructions for administrators; a definition of SIDS and other infant deaths; linking research on SIDS to child care accreditation criteria; and reflective questions and optional related activities on observable safe sleep practices, ongoing monitoring plan, and collaboration with families. Myths and facts, tips on infant sleep hygiene, and related resources are included.

Contact: National Association for the Education of Young Children, 1313 L Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 232-8777 Secondary Telephone: (800) 424-2460 Fax: (202) 328-1846 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.naeyc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Collaboration, Family professional relations, Infant death, Infants, Injury prevention, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Research, Resources for professionals, SIDS, Sleep position

Poyadue F. [1998]. Managed Care Health Plans: Introducing Family-Centered Care [Final report]. Santa Clara, CA: Parents Helping Parents, Inc., 41 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to introduce family-centered care into managed care health through a consumer/provider partnership. The public, local, State, and Federal health providers lacked knowledge about, and a connecting link to managed care health plans. These plans lacked knowledge about incorporating family-centered care, and lacked contact with consumers' issues as they concentrate on third party contracting payer agencies. Parents lacked assertiveness to function on boards or as equals in a partnership with health care providers. Bottom line: Children and families suffered. The goals and objectives of this project were to develop a parent-directed family resource center at the health care site; to create a position at the health care site entitled Parent Liaison; to provide training on family-centeredness and collaboration for physicians, nurses, other hospital staff, and parents; provide emotional support to families and staff through mentoring; and provide access to health information and community resources through a computerized directory (LINCS - Local Interagency Networking Computerized System). A parent and a physician co-authored a document on this model. An Acronym Dictionary was created. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Community Health workers, Family Centered Health Care, Family Professional Collaboration, Health Care Reform, Information Systems, Managed Care, Outreach, Training

Sandahl B. [1998]. Partnerships for Improved Community Care (PICC) [Final report]. Everett, WA: Children's Center of Providence General Medical Center, 47 pp.

Annotation: Providence General Medical Center's project, Partnerships for Community Care (PIC), has developed a family/professional advisory board model to monitor how children with special health care needs are cared for in an era of health care reform and managed care. These children and their families potentially face increased care problems including higher costs, lack of access to specialty care, uncoordinated and/or uncompensated care. The goal of the project was to work within the Snohomish County community to assure the availability of appropriate health services and improve support services in outreach clinics, a school, and a rural community. The project utilized a family/professional advisory board, a Child Health Survey, and community outreach activities to measure the impact of the changing health care system on children with special needs and their families. A systems approach was used to recommend policy and programmatic changes aimed at improved care and better health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Family professional collaboration, Health care reform, Managed care, Networking, Public policy, Training

Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project. 1998. Bridging out: Lessons learned in family-centered interprofessional collaboration—Year four. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 51 pp.

Annotation: This final report of the Health and Education Collaboration Project of the Hawaii Medical Association focuses on community-based university education as an effective strategy for training new practitioners. The report discusses what family-centered interprofessional collaboration is and what its principles are. The background, implementation, developmental stages, sustainability, and implications for future efforts of the project are discussed. Learning examples of family-centered interprofessional collaboration are also provided. Appendices include updates on MCHB demonstration projects and an overview of course competencies for practicum students at the University of Hawaii. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 1360 South Beretania Street, Second Floor, Honolulu, HI 96814, Telephone: (808) 536-7702 Fax: (808) 528-2376 E-mail: s_taba@aloha.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Curricula, Families, Family centered services, Hawaii, Interdisciplinary collaboration, Personnel, Professional education, Service delivery, Training

Iwaishi L, Taba S, Howard-Jones A, Brockman D, Yamashita L, Ambrose A. 1998. Training on family-centered interprofessional collaboration: A manual for pediatric residents. Honolulu, HI: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 165 pp.

Annotation: This training manual, designed for pediatric residents and other graduate students in helping professions, promotes the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required for providing family-centered services, specifically through interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of the training is to make participants aware of the positive value of family-centered, collaborative care and of professionals' role in providing such care. The concepts contained in the manual derive from two major schools of thought with regard to serving families: (1) family-centered care is the most effective care because families have opportunities to participate in decisions about their child's health care and education and (2) interprofessional collaboration recognizes that professionals interdependently—rather than independently—meet the multiple priorities and diverse needs of families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 1360 South Beretania Street, Second Floor, Honolulu, HI 96814, Telephone: (808) 536-7702 Contact Phone: (808) 536-7702 Ext. 2224 Fax: (808) 528-2376 E-mail: s_taba@aloha.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Families, Family centered services, Graduate education, Hawaii, Interdisciplinary collaboration, Internship and residency, Manuals, Nurses, Pediatricians, Personnel, Professional education, Service delivery, Social workers, Special education, Students, Teachers, Training

Malach R. [1997]. Opportunities for Parents and Professionals to Understand Strategies for Cross-Cultural Communication [Final report]. Bernalillo, NM: Southwest Communication Resources, 37 pp.

Annotation: The goals of this project were to: (1) identify cultural barriers to communication and collaboration between families and professionals related to sharing and maintaining health histories and personal information; and (2) define and identify effective, culturally competent strategies and materials that families of diverse cultures can use to maintain and share information with professionals. An evaluation consultant assisted in developing and monitoring the evaluation plan. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Cultural Diversity, Cultural Sensitivity, Family Centered Health Care, Family Professional Collaboration, Parent Professional Communication

Johnson C. [1997]. Building Family-Professional Collaboration in West Virginia [Final report]. Morgantown, WV: Klingberg Center for Child Development, 21 pp.

Annotation: The goal of this project was to enhance family-professional collaboration by integrating the principles and practices of family-centered, community-based, culturally competent, coordinated care into an existing statewide system of community-based Title V clinics that served children with special health needs (CSHN). The project (1) provided training to families and professionals first in a local county and then statewide; (2) created joint training opportunities for families and professionals; and (3) coordinated opportunities for the senior administrative staff in the Title V CSHN and university health care delivery systems to receive feedback from children and families using services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB99-144727.

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Family Professional Collaboration, Parent Education, Parent Professional Communication, Rural Population, State Staff Development, Training

Iwaishi L, Taba S, Howard-Jones A, Brockman D, Ambrose A. 1997. Training on family-centered interprofessional collaboration: Facilitator's manual (Draft). Honolulu, HI: Health and Education Collaboration Project, Hawaii Medical Association, 157 pp.

Annotation: This training manual, designed for pediatric residents and other graduate students in helping professions, promotes the attitudes, skills, and knowledge required for providing family-centered services, specifically through interprofessional collaboration. The purpose of the training is to make participants aware of the positive value of family-centered, collaborative care and of professionals' role in providing such care. The concepts contained in the manual derive from two major schools of thought with regard to serving families: (1) family-centered care is the most effective care because families have opportunities to participate in decisions about their child's health care and education and (2) interprofessional collaboration recognizes that professionals interdependently—rather than independently—meet the multiple priorities and diverse needs of families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Hawaii Medical Association, Health and Education Collaboration Project, 1360 South Beretania Street, Second Floor, Honolulu, HI 96814, Telephone: (808) 536-7702 Fax: (808) 528-2376 E-mail: s_taba@aloha.net Out of print.

Keywords: Children, Community based services, Curricula, Early childhood educators, Families, Family centered services, Graduate education, Hawaii, Interdisciplinary collaboration, Internship and residency, Manuals, Nurses, Pediatricians, Personnel, Professional education, Service delivery, Social workers, Special education, Students, Teachers, Training

New York State Department of Health, Bureau of Child and Adolescent Health, Family-Professional Training Institute. 1995. Making the pieces fit: Building family-professional collaboration—Training families and professionals in communication, negotiation and dispute resolution: Conference planning manual. Albany, NY: New York State Department of Health, Family-Professional Training Institute, 87 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides step-by-step instructions for planning a workshop for the implementation of, Making the Pieces Fit: Building Family-Professional Collaboration, a program designed to provide communications training to families with children who have special needs and health professionals who work with them. Topics covered in the first part of this manual include: preliminary planning; recruitment, screening, and selection of participant families and professionals; planning the first training session; evaluation; and the application process. The first part also includes a work plan checklist. The appendix includes standard forms for implementing a workshop (e.g., a program application, a selection process form, letters of acceptance/non-acceptance, a letter of agreement, etc.). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Collaboration, Dispute resolution, Family centered services, MCH programs, Negotiation, Parent professional relations, Professional education, Training materials

Hoyt D. 1994 (ca.). Strengthening Our Partnership: A Commitment to Parent Leadership in the Design of Iowa's Comprehensive Service System [Final report]. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa,

Annotation: The overall goal of the Strengthening Our Partnership project was to further develop services for Iowa's children with special health care needs and their families through activities that strengthened the effective leadership of parents in the design of a comprehensive service system. The three primary project objectives were to: (1) Establish statewide coordination among parents and parent programs to facilitate ongoing communication and collaboration; (2) establish a multiagency capacity for parent leadership in the design and delivery of services for children with special health care needs and their families; and (3) strengthen parent-professional teamwork in the development, implementation, and evaluation of family-centered programs and policies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children with Special Health care Needs, Family Professional Collaboration, Leadership Training, Parent Networks, Parent Professional Communication, Parents, Service Coordination

Hanson JL, Johnson BH, Jeppson ES, Thomas J, Hall JH. 1994. Hospitals: Moving forward with family-centered care. Bethesda, MD: Institute for Family-Centered Care, 44 pp.

Annotation: This document begins by defining family centered care and discussing its benefits. It goes on to explain the components of a family centered hospital care program: committed hospital leadership, personnel policies and practices, supportive architecture and design, professional communication with families, family-to-family support and networking, linking families with community resources, educating family-centered professionals, research design, and family involvement in hospital decisions. The concluding chapters offer practical tips for hospital personnel starting a family centered care program and strategies for family involvement in the process. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Institute for Patient and Family-Centered Care, 7900 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 405, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (301) 652-0281, ext. 16 Contact Phone: (301) 320-2686 Fax: (301) 652-0186 E-mail: institute@ipfcc.org Web Site: http://www.familycenteredcare.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-9642014-0-2.

Keywords: Child health services, Collaboration, Community programs, Ethics, Facility design and construction, Family centered care, Family support services, Health personnel, Hospital services, Parent participation, Parents, Policy development, Professional education, Program development, Research design

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.