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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 14 (14 total).

International Association of Dental Traumatology. 2016. Information for patients. International Association of Dental Traumatology, multiple items.

Annotation: This mobile app and poster provide information for parents and other caregivers about oral injuries, including how to prevent oral trauma in primary teeth, what to do in case of a fall that affects permanent teeth, and what to do if a permanent tooth is broken or knocked out. The app is available in Arabic, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, German, Greek, Indonesian, Italian, Malay, Northern Sami, Norwegian Bokmal, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Simplified Chinese, Spanish, Swedish, and Turkish. The poster is available in Arabic, Bulgarian, Chinese, Dutch, English, French, German, Greek, Hindi, Hungarian, Icelandic, Italian, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Slovenian, Spanish, Tamil, Turkish, and Vietnamese.

Contact: International Association of Dental Traumatology, RES Seminars Inc., 4425 Cass Street, Suite A, San Diego, CA 92019, E-mail: IADT@iadt-dentaltrauma.org Web Site: https://www.iadt-dentaltrauma.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Critical care, Dental care, Emergency medical services, Falls, First aid, Injuries, Injury prevention, International health, Mobile applications, Multimedia, Non English language materials, Oral health, Outcome and process assessment, Posters, Safety, Trauma care

Children's Safety Network. 2013. Traumatic brain injury (TBI): Resource guide 2013. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network, 14 pp.

Annotation: This resource guide provides information to help state maternal and child health and injury and violence prevention programs respond to the needs of infants, adolescents, and adults who are at risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Topics include fall prevention, motor vehicle safety, bicycle safety, sports safety, and abuse prevention. It also contains links to data, research studies, information on policy and legislation, prevention strategies, tools for program planning, and a list of national organizations that address TBI.

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bicycle injuries, Brain damage, Brain injuries, Child safety, Children, Falls, Infants, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle safety, Physical abuse, Sports injuries, Violence prevention

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention. 2012. National action plan for child injury prevention: An agenda to prevent injuries and promote the safety of children and adolescents in the United States. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Division of Unintentional Injury Prevention, 91 pp.

Annotation: This action plan describes goals and actions in six domains that inform concrete actions within the field of injury prevention to reduce child and adolescent injury in the United States. The six domains include data and surveillance, research, communication, education and training, health systems and health care, and policy. Injury prevention efforts are discussed for motor vehicle crashes, suffocation, drowning, as well as fires, burns, and falls. The plan concludes with a summary of goals and actions. An archive of the September 10, 2013 webinar broadcast of part I is available.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Burns, Children, Drowning, Falls, Infants, Injury prevention, Safety, Suffocation, Transportation injuries, Unintentional injuries

Levi J, Segal LM, Kohn D. 2012. The facts hurt: A state-by-state injury prevention policy report. Washington, DC: Trust for America's Health, 75 pp. (Issue report)

Annotation: This report provides information about state injury prevention policies and about recommendations for evidence-based strategies to reduce injuries in the United States. It focuses on a series of 10 injury-prevention indicators across each state that, collectively, offer an overview of areas of strength and weakness in the state's injury-prevention policies. Topics include vehicle injuries; violence-related injuries; falls; drowning; sports- and recreation-related injuries; injuries from poisoning; research tools for reducing injuries; and fire-related injuries.

Contact: Trust for America's Health, 1730 M Street, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 223-9870 Fax: (202) 223-9871 E-mail: info@tfah.org Web Site: http://healthyamericans.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Burns, Drowning, Falls, Injuries, Injury prevention, Poisoning, Recreational injuries, Research, Sports injuries, State initiatives, Transportation injuries, Violence

Peden M, Oyegbite K, Ozanne-Smith J, Hyder AA, Branche C, Rahman AKM, Rivara F, Bartolomeos K, eds. 2008. World report on child injury prevention. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organisation, 211 pp.

Annotation: This report brings together what is known about various types of child injuries and how to prevent them. The report aims to raise awareness about child injuries globally, draw attention to the preventability of child injuries, and make recommendations that all countries can implement to reduce child injuries. Topic covered include road traffic injuries, drowning, burns, falls, and poisonings.

Contact: World Health Organization, 20, Avenue Appia, Geneva, Switzerland , Telephone: (+ 41 22) 791 21 11 Fax: (+ 41 22) 791 3111 E-mail: info@who.int Web Site: http://www.who.int/en Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-92-4-156357-4.

Keywords: Child safety, Drowning, Burns, Falls, Injury prevention, International health, Motor vehicle crashes, Poisoning

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care. 1998. Kids Can't Fly: Strategy transfer guide—Models that work. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Primary Health Care, 24 pp.

Christoffel KK, Scheidt PC, Agran PF, Kraus JF, McLoughlin E, Paulson JA. 1992. Standard definitions for childhood injury research. [Bethesda, MD]: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report outlines classifications and definitions of variables used in childhood injury research as developed at a conference held March 20-21, 1989 by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). The report is intended as a tool for those involved with injury control efforts of various types. The broad areas addressed are grouped by demographic descriptors (age, race/ethnicity, region, socioeconomic status) and by the leading causes of child hood injury morbidity and mortality (motor vehicles, burns, drowning, falls, head/spine injury and violence). Each injury outline lists the range of factors potentially relevant to E-codes. Appendices list E-code groupings, references and conference participants.

Contact: Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, P.O. Box 3006, Rockville, MD 20847, Telephone: (800) 370-2943 Secondary Telephone: (888) 320-6942 Fax: (866) 760-5947 Web Site: https://www.nichd.nih.gov/Pages/index.aspx Document Number: NIH 92-1586.

Keywords: Burns, Children, Correlates of injury, Data collection, Data sources, Demographics, Drowning, External cause of injury codes, Falls, Head injuries, Injury prevention, International classification of diseases, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicles, Population surveillance, Public health agencies, Research, Spinal cord injuries, Unintentional injuries, Violence

Trauma Foundation. 1991. An advocate's guide to the cost of injury in the United States. San Francisco, CA: Trauma Foundation, 40 slides.

Annotation: This scripted presentation was adapted from a report entitled "Cost of Injury In the United States: A Report to Congress, 1989" which was prepared by researchers at the University of California, San Francisco and the Johns Hopkins University at the request of Congress and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. It provides some data on injury types and causes, with motor vehicles and firearms accounting for 50 percent. The information presented illustrates that beyond social and emotional costs, injuries have a devastating economic price. Six areas of injury are discussed: motor vehicles, firearms, falls, poisonings, drownings, and fire and burns. The guide presents information from this report in graphic form in order to provide useful tools to advocates who will explain the economic consequences of the problem of violence in the United States.

Contact: Trauma Foundation, San Francisco General Hospital, Building One, Room 300, San Francisco, CA 94110, Telephone: (415) 821-8209 Fax: (415) 821-8202 E-mail: tf@traumaaf.org Web Site: http://www.traumaf.org $95.00.

Keywords: Advocacy, Advocacy, Audiovisual materials, Burns, Costs, Drowning, Falls, Firearms, Fires, Injuries, Injuries--types, causes, agents, Injury prevention, Injury severity, Injury surveillance systems, Morbidity, Mortality, Motor vehicles, Poisons, Resources for professionals, Slides, Statistics, Tobacco, Training materials, Trauma care

Children's Safety Network. 1991. Child Health Day 1991: A selected annotated bibliography. [Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health], 31 pp.

Annotation: This annotated bibliography includes items recommended by members of the planning committee for Child Health Day 1991. Sections of the bibliography address overviews of injury issues; injury data; program components (overview, program development, advocacy, coalition building, and training); and injury types and causes (overview, bicycles, child care, drowning, falls, firearms, fire/burns, motor vehicles, occupational injuries, pedestrians, playgrounds, sports, toys, and violence). The bibliography also contains resource lists. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Contact Phone: (703) 625-7802 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Photocopy available at no charge. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHE014.

Keywords: Advocacy, Bicycles, Burns, Child Care, Children, Coalitions, Curricula, Data, Directories, Drowning, Educational materials, Falls, Firearms, Fires, Health observances, Injury prevention, Motor vehicles, Occupational injuries, Pedestrians, Playgrounds, Program development, Sports, Toys, Traffic safety, Violence

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control. 1988. Public health surveillance of 1990 injury control objectives for the nation. MMWR Surveillance Summaries 37(SS-1):1-68,

Annotation: This issue of "Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: CDC Surveillance Summaries" presents information charting the progress toward the 1990 Injury Control Objectives for the Nation. In each article, surveillance data are used to monitor the nation's progress toward a specific objective. Nine surveillance summaries address the following topics: deaths from motor vehicle-related injuries, deaths due to injury in the home, deaths from falls, drownings in the United States, hospitalizations due to tap water scalds, deaths from residential fires, unintentional firearm-related fatalities, homicides among black males, and suicides among persons 15-24 years of age. The problems impeding further progress and the steps necessary to attain the objective are also discussed. The summaries were developed to describe and clarify the injury problem, and to stimulate additional interest in applying surveillance methods to the field of injury control.

Keywords: 1990 Objectives for the Nation, Drowning, Falls, Firearms, Fires, Homicide, Injury prevention, Motor vehicles, Population surveillance, Scalds, Statistics, Suicide

New England Network to Prevent Childhood Injuries. 1988. Slide script, community action to keep our kids safe (age 0-5). Newton, MA: Education Development Center, 6 pp.

Annotation: These slide scripts with accompanying slides are available in two formats, one for service providers, and one for lay audiences. This script, for service providers, introduces injuries as preventable, predictable events and provides suggestions for preventive strategies which draw upon technological, regulatory, and educational techniques. Another script, "Keep Our Kids Safe, " is available for use with lay audiences; it discusses falls, burns, and poisonings; and describes the proper use of car safety seats. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Contact Phone: (617) 969-7100, x237 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csninfo@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Out of print.

Keywords: Burns, Child health, Children, Falls, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle safety, Occupant protection, Poisoning

New England Network to Prevent Childhood Injuries. 1988. Slide script, keep our kids safe (age 0-5). Newton, MA: Education Development Center, 9 pp.

Annotation: These slide scripts with accompanying slides are available in two formats, one for service providers, and one for lay audiences. This script, for use with lay audiences, discusses falls, burns, and poisonings; and it describes the proper use of car safety seats. Another script, "Community Action to Keep Our Kids Safe," is available for service providers, it introduces injuries as preventable, predictable events and provides suggestions for preventive strategies which draw upon technological, regulatory, and educational techniques. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (617) 969-7100 Fax: (617) 969-5979 E-mail: comment@edc.org Web Site: http://www.edc.org Out of print.

Keywords: Burns, Car seats, Child health, Children, Falls, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle safety, Occupant protection, Poisoning

Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Division of Family Health Services, Statewide Comprehensive Injury Prevention Program. 1986. Safestate, safehome inspector's notes. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Statewide Comprehensive Injury Prevention Program, 28 pp.

Annotation: This product from a SPRANS project of SCIPP and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health describes the SAFEHOME program. The program's goal was to reduce the number of serious residential injuries to children 6 years old and under, by reducing hazards and promoting safe practices in the home. At the core of the program is a HOME SAFETY CHECK which can be done in a 15-minute version or the 1-hour full check. The program involves a trained SAFEHOME inspector who, using the SAFEHOME Checklist, goes with the parents or caretakers on a room by room tour. Conditions that pose risks to children are explained by the inspector along with changes that will make for a SAFEHOME. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Injury Prevention and Control Program, 250 Washington Street, Fourth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 624-5557 Contact Phone: (617) 727-1246

Keywords: Burns, Child safety, Choking, Falls, Household safety, Injury prevention, Massachusetts, Poisoning, Residential injuries, Scalds, State programs

St. Louis University, School of Public Health. Safe n' sound: Helping pediatricians and parents keep young children safer—A program for children's hospitals to prevent childhood injury in the community. St. Louis, MO: St. Louis University,

Annotation: This website provides information for health professionals about the Safe 'n Sound program, how it can be used in hospitals and clinics, and how it can help parents protect their children from injury while at home or in a motor vehicles. Users' reviews are available on the site, as is information about childhood injuries, a toolkit, questions and answers, and information about getting started. The program is available for download free of charge from the website and can also be ordered on a flash drive.

Contact: St. Louis University, College for Public Health and Social Justice, 221 North Grand Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63103, Telephone: (314) 977-4084 Web Site: http://www.slu.edu/publichealth.xml Available from the website.

Keywords: Burns, Children, Drowning, Falls, Suffocation, Infants, Injury prevention, Motor vehicle injuries, Motor vehicle safety, Poisoning, Programs, Safety, Young children

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.