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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 9 (9 total).

American Optometric Association. n.d.. Ready for school: Understanding the difference between vision screenings and vision examinations. St. Louis, MO: American Optometric Association, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for parents provides information about the difference between vision screenings and vision examinations and explains why it is important for young children to receive comprehensive vision and eye examinations conducted by a doctor before they start school. The fact sheet explains the essential elements of a comprehensive eye examination used to ensure that learning is maximized through good vision.

Contact: American Optometric Association, 243 North Lindbergh Boulevard, First Floor , St. Louis, MO 63141, Telephone: (314) 991-4100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 365-2219 Fax: (314) 991-4101 Web Site: http://www.aoanet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Consumer education materials, Eye diseases, Screening, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

National Center for Medical Home Implementation, National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health. [2013]. The role of the medical home in vision and eye health: A fact sheet for medical professionals. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: National Center for Medical Home Implementation, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet for health professional provides information about the role the medical home plays in ensuring that children receive timely eye examinations; vision screenings; and, when necessary, eye examinations and treatment for vision conditions. The fact sheet discusses common eye problems in preschool-age children, the importance of educating families about vision milestones, guidelines for vision screening, and benefits of early vision screening and eye examinations in the medical home. Links to resources for more information are provided. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Eye diseases, Families, Medical home, Resource materials, Treatment, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

Prevent Blindness America, National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health, Transitions Optical Healthy Sight for Life Fund. 2013. Focus on children's eye health in culturally diverse populations. Chicago, IL: Prevent Blindness America, 7 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights children's eye-related issues including factors that further impact members of various ethnic groups. Topics include the difference between vision screening and eye examinations; risk factors; eyewear solutions; eye health among ethnic groups (African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics, and Whites); signs of vision problems in children; healthy eye tips for children; and where to find eye care. Tips for parents and recommendations for primary care health professionals are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Consumer education materials, Ethnic groups, Eye care, Eye diseases, Health promotion, Minority groups, Primary care, Risk factors, Screening

National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health, National Center for Medical Home Implementation. 2013. Vision screening is key to healthy development. Chicago, IL: National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information for parents and professionals on vision screening and healthy development in children. Topics include the importance of the medical home, signs of a vision problem, how parents can be active participants in their child's health, sources of financial help, and organizational resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health, Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: kbaldonado@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://nationalcenter.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Consumer education materials, Eye care, Eye diseases, Health promotion, Medical home, Screening

American Academy of Ophthalmology . 2011. How does a child get pink eye? Ask an eye M.D.. [San Francisco, CA]: American Academy of Ophthalmology , 1 video (1 min., 22 sec.).

Annotation: This online video discusses pink eye, a common childhood eye infection that can be highly contagious. Topics include how to prevent the spread of pink eye and what symptoms to look for to know an eye examination is needed to diagnose a possible eye infection.

Contact: American Academy of Ophthalmology, 655 Beach Street, San Francisco, CA 94109, Telephone: (415) 561-8500 Fax: (415) 561-8533 E-mail: comm@aao.org Web Site: http://www.aao.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Children, Eye care, Eye diseases, Infections, Vision

Prevent Blindness America. 2010. Our vision for children's vision: A national call to action for the advancement of children's vision and eye health. [Chicago, IL]: Prevent Blindness America, 38 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a platform for children's vision and eye health. The report discusses the importance of professional eye health care and emphasizes the role of vision screening in eye care. Also addressed are the importance of ensuring that children are prepared to enter school unhampered by undetected vision problems; eye safety at home, at school, and at play; and advances in pediatric vision research. The report also acknowledges the importance of public awareness and understanding of children's vision and eye health.

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 E-mail: info@preventblindness.org Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Eye care, Eye diseases, Eye injuries, Prevention, Research, Treatment, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests

American Optometric Association. 2002. Pediatric eye and vision examination. [2nd ed.]. St. Louis, MO: American Optometric Association, 60 pp. (Optometric clinical practice guideline)

Annotation: This guideline describes appropriate examination procedures for evaluation of the eye health and vision status of infants and children to reduce the risk of vision loss and facilitate normal visual development. The guideline contains recommendations for timely diagnosis, intervention, and, when necessary, consultation or referral for treatment by another health professional. Topics include the epidemiology of eye and vision disorders in children, the pediatric eye and vision examination, examination of infants and toddlers, examination of preschool children, examination of school-age children, and management of children.

Contact: American Optometric Association, 243 North Lindbergh Boulevard, First Floor , St. Louis, MO 63141, Telephone: (314) 991-4100 Secondary Telephone: (800) 365-2219 Fax: (314) 991-4101 Web Site: http://www.aoanet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Diagnosis, Eye care, Eye diseases, Infant health, Intervention, Prevention, Treatment, Vision, Vision disorders, Vision screening, Vision tests, Young children

Hankinson SE, Colditz GA, Manson JE, Speizer F, Manson JE, eds. 2001. Healthy women, healthy lives: A guide to preventing disease from the landmark Nurses' Health Study. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster, 546 pp.

Annotation: This book presents information from the Nurses' Health Study on a woman's probability of developing specific diseases and suggests how that probability may change with certain alterations in diet, weight control, physical activity, and other lifestyle changes. Part one discusses the Nurses' Health Study and what observations have been made by researchers and what they mean to the study of women's health issues. Part two provides information and suggestions on lowering the risk of diseases. Topics covered include coronary heart disease, different types of cancers, stroke, diabetes, osteoporosis, asthma, arthritis, age-related eye disease, and Alzheimer's disease. The third part provides information on changing behaviors including physical activity, weight control, smoking, nutrients, foods, alcohol, vitamins and minerals, postmenopausal hormones, birth control, and pain relievers. The appendices give information on types of epidemiological studies; being an informed consumer of health information; and a section on tables on weight and nutrition. The book concludes with a glossary, selected readings, and an index.

Contact: Simon and Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the Americas , New York, NY 10020, Telephone: (212) 698-7000 Web Site: http://www.simonsays.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-684-85519-4.

Keywords: Alcohols, Alzheimers disease, Analgesic drugs, Antiinflammatory drugs, Arthritis, Asthma, Breast cancer, Cancer, Colon cancer, Coronary care, Diabetes mellitus, Disease prevention, Eye diseases, Family planning, Food, Hormone replacement therapy, Life cycle, Lung cancer, Menopause, Minerals, Nutrition, Osteoporosis, Ovarian cancer, Physical activity, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Reproductive health, Research programs, Skin cancers, Smoking, Strokes, Vitamins, Weight management, Women's health, Women's health promotion

Karelitz S. 1969. When your child is ill: A guide to infectious diseases in childhood [Rev. ed.]. New York, NY: Random House, 568 pp.

Annotation: This manual is designed to alert lay people to conditions in children that necessitate prompt medical attention and to answer many common questions parents have about children's communicable disease. The manual is divided into eight main parts: (1) about causes, symptoms, and prevention, (2) common childhood diseases, (3) respiratory diseases and related conditions, (4) diseases of the nervous system, (5) intestinal diseases, (6) diseases of the mouth and eyes, (7) skin conditions, and (8) venereal diseases. Each section includes common questions and their answers.

Keywords: Child health, Communicable diseases, Eye diseases, Intestinal diseases, Mouth diseases, Nervous system diseases, Parents, Prevention, Respiratory diseases, Sexually transmitted diseases, Skin diseases

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.