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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (31 total).

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. n.d.. Mi futuro será brillante: Actividad física y alimentación saludable—para mujeres adultas. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 22 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to encourage Spanish-speaking adult women to increase current levels of physical activity, healthy eating, and to communicate with their health care providers to set goals for behavioral changes. It is a companion to the online guide, a set of 10 tip sheets which expand on the topics and provide practical information, ideas, and activities to help women adopt healthy behaviors to reach their goals.

Keywords: Bright Futures, Consumer education materials, Exercise, Nutrition, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Spanish language materials, Women's health

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2016. Overweight and obesity in kids and teens: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find care, services, and support and websites about overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, Bibliographies, Body weight, Child health, Children, Diet, Electronic publications, Exercise, Families, Health behavior, Nutrition, Obesity, Weight gain, Weight management

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2016. Physical activity in kids and teens: Resources for families (upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This breif is designed to help families find websites and learn more about physical activity and kids and teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Exercise, Families, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fitness, Recreation, Special health care needs

American Academy of Pediatrics Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight and Kognito. 2016. Change Talk™: Changing the conversation about childhood obesity. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight, 1 v.

Annotation: This website and mobile application are designed to help pediatricians and other health care professionals lead conversations with parents and children about healthy weight. It provides a virtual practice environment in which health care professionals learn to apply motivational interviewing techniques. Professionals practice helping the virtual child and family identify motivation for change, and support them to implement modifications to their diet, screen time habits, and exercise routines.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, Institute for Healthy Childhood Weight, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (847) 434-4000 E-mail: obesity@aap.org Web Site: https://ihcw.aap.org/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Body weight, Children, Decision making, Exercise, Families, Goals, Health behavior, Interviews, Mobile applications, Motivation, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Role playing

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 2012. The guide to clinical preventive services. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 212 pp.

Annotation: This guide reviews the evidence for and against many preventive services, including screening tests, counseling interventions, and immunizations, and recommends 64 preventive services shown to be effective. The guide presents recommendations first for adults, listing diseases, conditions, and treatments alphabetically. The next section is devoted to children and adolescents and discusses 15 topics. Immunizations are discussed in the next section. Topics in progress discusses disease and condition recommendations under review in 2012. Appendices include information on how recommendations are graded, a list of members of the task force, acknowledgements, information about the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, and more resources.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 12-05154; ISBN 978-58763-421-5.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Exercise, Health care delivery, Health services, Injuries, Nutrition, Prevention, Screening, Sexually transmitted diseases, Substance abuse

The Arc of New Jersey, Mainstreaming Medical Care. 2012. Prevent, understand, and live with diabetes: A guide for individuals with developmental disabilities. North Brunswick, NJ: The Arc of New Jersey, Mainstreaming Medical Care, ca. 65 pp.

Annotation: This guide assists those with intellectual disabilities in preventing and managing Type 2 diabetes by defining the condition and offering advice on prevention. It discusses the importance of getting tested early for diabetes, the role of exercise, healthy weight, and healthy foods in preventing diabetes; understanding the warning signs and blood sugar testing; and how stress, oral health, and visits to the doctor help with the control and monitoring of the disease. This publication is in English and Spanish.

Contact: The Arc of New Jersey, 985 Livingston Avennue, North Brunswick, NJ 08902, Telephone: (732) 246-2525 Fax: (732) 214-1834 E-mail: info@arcnj.org Web Site: http//www.arcnj.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, Disease prevention, Exercise, Health promotion, Low literacy materials, Nutrition, Physical activity, Spanish language materials, Weight management

Carpenter CS, Stehr MF. 2010. Intended and unintended effects of youth bicycle helmet laws. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 29 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 15658)

Annotation: This report presents findings that confirm previous research indicating that mandatory bicycle helmet laws in the United States reduce bicycling fatalities and increase helmet use, but it also shows that the laws have significantly reduced youth bicycling. The results highlight intended and unintended consequences of public policies adopted in over 20 states that require youths to wear a helmet when riding a bicycle. The report outlines the empirical approach used, the data collected, and the final research results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bicycle safety, Exercise, Injury prevention, Legislation, Physical activity, Public policy, State programs, Youth

Action for Healthy Kids. 2008. Progress or promises?: What's working for and against healthy schools. [Skokie, IL]: Action for Healthy Kids, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report presents perspectives gathered by interview of school administrators, parents, educators, nutrition and health professionals, wellness advocates, federal and local government agencies, community groups, school board members, students, and others on the progress towards implementing healthy eating and physical activity programs in schools and the deficits that remain after five years of work by Action for Healthy Kids and like-minded groups at the national, state, and grassroots levels. In addition to perceptions of healthy eating and physical activity programs, the report assesses the growth of public awareness about school wellness, stakeholder roles and activities, and resources. The report identifies gaps to be addressed in future initiatives.

Contact: Action for Healthy Kids, 600 W. Van Buren Street, Suite 720, Chicago, IL 60607-3758, Telephone: (800) 416-5136 Fax: (312) 212-0098 E-mail: info@actionforhealthykids.org Web Site: http://www.actionforhealthykids.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Community programs, Disease prevention, Exercise, Family school relations, Health education, Health promotion, Nutrition, Obesity, Physical activity, Physical education, Programs, School health education, School lunch programs

Harris ML, Dillon C, Nelson R. 2007. Healthy schools, healthy communities, and youth obesity: Lessons learned from the national forums and regional dialogues of the NACo Center for Sustainable Communities. Washington, DC: Center for Sustainable Communities, National Association of Counties, 19 pp.

Annotation: This publication describes insights from three 2006 dialogues called to discuss the challenges and opportunities of using school programs to improve youth health and fitness and contains practical, replicable information for community leaders. Contents include a brief summary of how the dialogues were hosted and facilitated, the challenges and opportunities faced in improving youth health in collaboration with schools, the strategies and actions implemented, and a description of two related forums conducted with African American and Latino county officials on the impacts of obesity of the youth in their communities and their specific community and cultural challenges. Appendices include contact information and a questionnaire for participants in the dialogues.

Contact: National Association of Counties, 25 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 393-6226 Web Site: http://www.naco.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Blacks, Cultural factors, Exercise, Health promotion, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Physical education, Physical fitness, Prevention programs, School age children, School health education, Youth

American Institute for Preventive Medicine. 2006. Healthy life: Prenatal self-care guide. (5th ed.). Farmington Hills, MI: American Institute for Preventive Medicine, 96 pp.

Annotation: This self-care guide has two parts: one providing information about pregnancy, labor, and delivery and the other about health problems and common complaints during pregnancy. The sections present the problem or complaint, list the causes, list the treatments, present a list of questions to ask when visiting a health care provider, list symptoms when a health care provider should be called, and list self care tips. The guide ends with a glossary of necessary terms. It is illustrated with drawings.

Contact: American Institute for Preventive Medicine, 30445 Northwestern Highway, Suite 350, Farmington Hills, MI 48334-3102 , Telephone: (800) 345-2476 Secondary Telephone: (810) 539-1800 Fax: (810) 539-1808 E-mail: aipm@healthylife.com Web Site: http://www.healthylife.com/ $5.95, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Childbirth, Exercise, Labor, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Pregnancy complications, Prenatal care, Prenatal development, Prenatal education, Therapeutics

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals. 2006. Postpartum counseling: A quick reference guide for clinicians. [Rev. ed.]. Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 29 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to assist health professionals in counseling women during the postpartum period. The guide addresses three areas of concern: (1) diet, nutrition, and exercise; (2) postpartum mental health; and (3) sexuality and contraception. Each section includes a checklist of counseling points that the health professional can discuss with the patient, as well as a discussion of related health issues. The guide concludes with a reference list and a chart of contraceptive options for U.S. women in the postpartum period.

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Single copies available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Contraception, Counseling, Diet, Exercise, Mental disorders, Mental health, Nutrition, Postpartum care, Sexuality, Women's health

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. 2004. Helping your overweight child. Bethesda, MD: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 4 pp.

Annotation: This pamphlet provides information and health strategies for parents whose children are overweight. Families are encouraged to adopt healthy eating habits, reduce fat intake, and increase physical activity rather than placing the child on a restrictive diet or using food as a reward or punishment. Parents are advised to consult a health professional to determine whether the child's weight is within a healthy range or whether the child will "grow into" a healthy weight. Basic nutrition information and tips for changing attitudes about food are provided. Additional reading and resources are suggested. The publication was field tested for appropriate reading level and design.

Contact: Weight-Control Information Network, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, One Win Way, Bethesda, MD 20892-3665, Telephone: (877) 946-4627 Fax: (202) 828-1028 E-mail: WIN@info.niddk.nih.gov Web Site: http://win.niddk.nih.gov/index.htm Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: NIH 04-4096.

Keywords: Child nutrition, Diet, Exercise, Obesity, Weight loss

Marti J, with Hine A. 1998. The alternative health and medicine encyclopedia. (2nd ed.). Detroit, MI: Visible Ink Press, 462 pp.

Annotation: This book presents information on a wide range of alternative or complementary methods for providing health care. It provides an introductory chapter on alternative medicine which covers approaches such as acupuncture and acupressure, biofeedback, homeopathy, massage, hydrotherapy, kinesiology, and visualization therapy, among others. It includes chapters on the following topics: natural nutrition; vitamins; minerals and trace elements; botanical medicines; coping with stress; stress-related disorders; drug abuse and addiction; mental health disorders; common male and female health problems; pregnancy, childbirth, and infant care; dental care; eye, ear, nose, and throat problems; cancer; heart disorders; and aging. Each chapter presents alternative treatments for specific conditions, includes sidebars which summarize certain strategies, and provides bibliographical references. A glossary, a general bibliography, and an index are included.

Contact: Cengage Learning, P.O. Box 6904, Florence, KY 41022-6904, Telephone: (800) 354-9706 Fax: (800) 487-8488 E-mail: esales@cengage.com Web Site: http://www.cengage.com/ Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-8103-8303-9.

Keywords: Aging, Alternative medicine, Cancer, Childbirth, Dental care, Drug abuse, Encyclopedias, Exercise, Health services, Heart diseases, Holistic health, Infant care, Men, Mental disorders, Minerals, Nutrition, Pregnancy, Stress, Stress management, Vitamins, Women

Allen L, ed. 1997. Physical activity ideas for action: Elementary level. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 131 pp.

Annotation: This manual presents information for elementary teachers to use to include physical activity and fitness programs in the school day. The manual contains examples of physical fitness program ideas used in elementary schools, suggestions for preparation for fitness testing, ways to incorporate physical activity in lessons on other subjects, ways to encourage fitness outside of school, and tips and ideas for special fitness events. Also included are sample forms and certificates for use with children and their parents. This manual was written with support from the Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA).

Contact: Human Kinetics, P.O. Box 5076, Champaign, IL 61825-5076, Telephone: (800) 747-4457 Contact Phone: (800) 747-4457 Fax: (217) 351-1549 E-mail: info@hkusa.com Web Site: http://www.humankinetics.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-88011-554-8.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Exercise, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fitness, School age children, School health programs, Teaching

U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. 1996. Guide to clinical preventive services: Report of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2nd ed.). Baltimore, MD: Williams and Wilkins, 953 pp.

Annotation: This book reviews the evidence for and against many preventive services, including screening tests, counseling interventions, and immunizations and chemoprophylaxis, and recommends those for which there are evidence that they are effective. Diseases and disorders covered under screening include cardiovascular, neoplastic, metabolic, nutritional, environmental, infectious, vision and hearing, prenatal, congenital, musculoskeletal, and mental, plus substance abuse. Counseling topics include healthy behaviors and injury prevention. Childhood and adult immunizations, and hormone and aspirin prophylaxis are also discussed. A set of cards covers interventions for the general population and for high-risk populations in the following groups: ages birth to 10 years, 11 to 24 years, 25 to 64 years, age 65 and older, and pregnant women. A list of conditions for which clinicians should remain alert is also included.

Contact: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, P.O. Box 1620, Hagerstown, MD 21741, Telephone: (800) 638-3030 Secondary Telephone: (301) 223-23000 Fax: (301) 223-2400 E-mail: customerservice@lww.com Web Site: http://www.lww.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-683-08508-5.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Exercise, Health care delivery, Health services, Injuries, Nutrition, Prevention, Sexually transmitted diseases, Substance abuse

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports. 1996. Physical activity and health: A report of the Surgeon General. Washington, DC: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 278 pp., exec. summ. (14 pp.), at a glance (4 pp.).

Annotation: This report focuses on the relationship between physical activity and health; it emphasizes the fact that Americans can improve their health and the quality of their lives by exercising moderately on a daily basis. An introductory chapter summarizes the report's findings and presents the conclusions of each of the subsequent chapters. The individual chapters provide an historical overview of exercise, its terminology, the evolution of recommended activity levels, and techniques for measuring physical activity; the physiologic response and long-term adaptation; the effects of physical activity on health and disease; trends in physical exercise; and understanding of promoting physical activity to adults, children, and adolescents. A four-page flyer subtitled At-A-Glance provides a brief overview of this information.

Contact: U.S. Government Publishing Office, 732 North Capitol Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20401, Telephone: (202) 512-1800 Secondary Telephone: (866) 512-1800 Fax: (202) 512-2104 E-mail: contactcenter@gpo.gov Web Site: http://www.gpo.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GPO 017-023-00196-5.

Keywords: Adolescents, Adults, Children, Demography, Disease prevention, Exercise, Health promotion, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Statistics

Hinson C. 1995. Fitness for children. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics, 158 pp.

Annotation: This book includes background materials that describe the importance of children's physical fitness, goals for teaching physical fitness programs, the basics of fitness, and strategies for teaching children about physical fitness. The book describes three types of exercise: cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility; it presents a collection of activities, exercises, and home assignments for each category. The descriptions of each activity indicate its applicability for various school grades, physical abilities the children should exhibit prior to starting the exercise, materials needed, organizational and procedural instructions, teaching and safety tips, and homework suggestions.

Contact: Nutrition Counseling Education Services, 1904 East 123rd Street, Olathe, KS 66061-5886, Telephone: (800) 445-5653 Secondary Telephone: (314) 872-8370 Fax: (314) 432-1380 E-mail: NCES@worldnet.att.net Web Site: http://www.mosby.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-87322-472-8; item no. 1807.

Keywords: Children, Exercise, Physical education, Physical fitness

National Association for Sport and Physical Education. 1995. Moving into the Future: National physical education standards—A guide to content and assessment. Reston, VA: American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, 125 pp.

Annotation: This book lists and discusses standards for physical abilities of children and adolescents in kindergarten through grade 12. It gives a definition of a physically educated person, then expands the definition into twenty outcome statements, which are expressed in goals and assessment materials for each grade that can be used by physical education teachers. The goal of the program is to foster a love for physical activities and to develop physical skills in children and adolescents so that they will continue to exercise throughout their lives.

Contact: SHAPE America–Society of Health and Physical Educators, 1900 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1598, Telephone: (800) 213-7193 Contact Phone: (800) 321-0789 Fax: (703) 476-9527 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.shapeamerica.org Available in libraries. Document Number: Stock no.: 304-10083.

Keywords: Curricula, Exercise, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fitness, Sports, Standards

Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health. 1995. CATCH physical education curriculum. Washington, DC: National Cholesterol Education Program, 103 pp., 1 box activity cards.

Annotation: This guidebook and set of exercise cards is aimed at physical education specialists and teachers. The Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH), tested with third through fifth grade children in several schools, intends to establish three behavior patterns: participation in physical activity, healthful eating habits, and non-smoking. The teacher's guidebook gives goals, a description of the activity cards, discussion on how to use them safely, equipment needed, special activities, sample lesson plans, bibliography, and appendices that describe games, suggest adaptations to limited space or inclement weather, and give resource lists and blank forms. The resources include references to other CATCH publications that mention nutrition. The activity cards are divided into warm-up and cool-down activities, aerobic activities, aerobic sports, walk-jog-run, and other activities.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Curricula, Educational materials, Exercise, Health promotion, Heart diseases, Physical activity, Physical education, Physical fitness, Prevention, Sports

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service. [1993?]. Promoting healthy diets and active lifestyles to lower-ses adults: Market research for public education. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, 99 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the findings of a study that was undertaken to understand better how members of the hard-to-reach American public perceive health and the role of diet, exercise, and weight control in the prevention of certain chronic diseases. The market research techniques of focus group discussions and analysis of commercial market data on media use and leisure practices were used to gather data that could be applied to the design of health communication programs. The final chapter of the report discusses the implications of the market research for public education programs.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov

Keywords: Community based services, Consumer education, Diet, Exercise, Health education, Health promotion, Market research, Nutrition, Nutrition education, Socioeconomic status, Weight management

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.