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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (87 total).

Larsen B, Larsen W. n.d.. Project performance: An analysis by ranks. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 29 pp. (Quantods series no.: 2-10 (9))

Annotation: This paper presents a method of comparative composite scoring of project performance for use in the Children and Youth Program. Seven proxy indicators measuring project performance in health care delivery for comprehensive health care projects are used. By means of a transformation procedure, individual performance measures are converted into a single score measuring composite project performance. This paper is part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Evaluation methods, Federal MCH programs, Measures, Statistical analysis

Larsen B, Larsen W. n.d.. Ranking of reporting performance among Children and Youth Projects. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project, 21 pp. (Quantods series no.: 2-11 (10))

Annotation: This paper is an analysis focusing on the completeness, consistency, and timeliness of reports submitted for Children and Youth Program grant continuation. This is intended as an administrative tool for identification of areas where action can be most effectively applied toward replanning, reorganizing, reallocation of resources, redirection, and modified supervision of ongoing services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Adolescent health programs, Child health programs, Children and Youth Projects, Evaluation methods, Federal MCH programs, Measures, Reports, Statistical analysis

Healthy Teen Network and ETR Associates. n.d.. Weaving science & practice: Frequently asked questions about science-based approaches. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 20 pp.

Annotation: This document describes seven science-based approaches in adolescent pregnancy, HIV, and sexually transmitted infection prevention. Topics include assessment, health education and behavior change theory, logic models, science-based programs, adaptation and fidelity, characteristics of promising programs, and process and outcome evaluation. Additional topics include the benefits of using science-based approaches, ten steps for getting to outcomes, and training and technical assistance.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy prevention, Assessment, Behavior modification, HIV, Health behavior, Health education, Methods, Models, Outcome evaluation, Prevention programs, Process evaluation, Sexually transmitted diseases

Community Preventive Services Task Force. 2017. Guide to using insufficient evidence (IE) findings from the Community Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force). Atlanta, GA: Community Preventive Services Task Force, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document for public health practitioners provides guidance on how to interpret and use insufficient evidence (IE) findings based on systematic reviews of peer-reviewed literature for intervention approaches that aim to improve behaviors, services, programs, or policies. Topics include understanding the question posed in the review, considering why the systematic review of evidence resulted in an IE finding, examining individual studies in the review, and making decisions based on the evidence. An example from the field is included. Guidance for public health funders and researchers are also available.

Contact: Community Preventive Services Task Force, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Community Guide Branch, 1600 Clifton Road, N.E., MSE69, Atlanta, GA 30329, Telephone: (404) 498-6595 E-mail: communityguide@cdc.gov Web Site: https://www.thecommunityguide.org/task-force/community-preventive-services-task-force-members Available from the website.

Keywords: Decision making, Evaluation methods, Research methodology, Research reviews

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. An evidence framework for genetic testing. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 148 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings on the evidence base for different types of genetic tests for patient management and provides recommendations to advance the development of an adequate evidence base for genetic tests to improve patient care and treatment. Contents include information about the uses of genetic testing; ethical, legal, and social implications; assessment of genetic tests; evidence; and recommendations for research and a framework for decision making related to the use of genetic tests in clinical care.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Decision making, Disease management, Evaluation methods, Genetic screening, Models, Outcome and process assessment, Patient care, Policy development, Research, Screening tests

Steuerle E, Jackson LM, eds; National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, Committee on Use of Economic Evidence to Inform Investments in Children, Youth, and Families. 2016. Advancing the power of economic evidence to inform investments in children, youth, and families. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 218 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study on how to improve the use of economic evidence to inform investments in children, youth, and families. Topics include methods for economic evaluation and how current practices in the production of economic evidence could be improved. Contents include a roadmap outlining a multipronged strategy for fostering multistakeholder partnerships to address issues and for improving incentives for the use of economic evidence for various stakeholders, ranging from publishers of economic research results to program evaluators.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-44059-2.

Keywords: Children, Collaboration, Economics, Evaluation, Families, Methods, Models, Research, Youth

John Snow, Inc. 2016. Fostering effective integration of behavioral health and primary care in Massachusetts: Year 1 report. Boston, MA: Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts Foundation, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes the activities of 10 primary care and behavioral health organizations with established integration programs in Massachusetts to identify success factors, barriers, challenges, and opportunities for change. Contents include a description of grantee organizations followed by a description of findings related to how they defined success for their integration efforts, perceptions of the critical components of integrated programs, common barriers to integration, and measures used to assess programs. The evaluation framework, a list of the process and outcome data elements collected by grantees, and grantee profiles are appended.

Contact: John Snow, Inc., 44 Farnsworth Street, Boston, MA 02210-1211, Telephone: (617) 482-9485 Fax: (617) 482-0617 E-mail: jsinfo@jsi.com Web Site: http://www.jsi.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Data collection, Demonstration grants, Evaluation methods, Health care delivery, Massachusetts, Measures, Mental health, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Primary care, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Service integration

Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation Technical Assistance Team. 2016. Creating a continuous quality improvement plan. Arlington, VA: James Bell Associates, 13 pp. (CQI brief)

Annotation: This brief is designed to help Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting grantees develop a continuous quality improvement (CQI) plan and communicate it to others within their organization. The brief explains what the plan should cover and includes a sample outline and template for drafting a CQI plan. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: James Bell Associates, 3033 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650, Arlington, VA 22201, Telephone: (800) 546-3230 Fax: (703) 243-3017 E-mail: info@jbassoc.com Web Site: http://www.jbassoc.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Communication, Diffusion of innovation, Evaluation methods, Federal grants, Home visiting, Information dissemination, Models, Program evaluation, Program improvement, Quality assurance

AcademyHealth. 2016. What tools are effective in screening for adverse childhood experiences among children?. Washington, DC: AcademyHealth, 9 pp. (Rapid evidence review)

Annotation: This document synthesizes peer-reviewed systematic reviews of measures that can be used to screen children enrolled in Medicaid for adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), defined as stressful or traumatic events including abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction. Contents include the policy context, supporting evidence, and limitations. The appendices contain definitions of terms; search terms and databases used in the review; a table of selected measures including the measure name, type, ACEs, strengths, limitations, and other considerations; and systematic reviews included in the evidence review.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Evaluation methods, Evidence based medicine, Low income groups, Measures, Medicaid, Public policy, Research reviews, Screening, Stress, Trauma

AcademyHealth. 2016. What evidence-based interventions for parents and families help mitigate adverse childhood experiences among children?. Washington, DC: AcademyHealth, 6 pp. (Rapid evidence review)

Annotation: This document synthesizes peer-reviewed systematic reviews on the effectiveness of interventions that help to mitigate parental and familial factors that may contribute to adverse childhood experiences among children. Contents include the policy context, supporting evidence, and limitations. Topics include parent education programs (conducted outside the home), home visit programs, dual treatment programs for substance abuse, and trauma-informed care. The appendices contain definitions of terms; search terms and databases used in the review; and a table that describes the systematic reviews included in the review.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Evaluation methods, Evidence based medicine, Home visiting, Intervention, Low income groups, Medicaid, Parent education, Public policy, Research reviews, Stress, Substance abuse treatment, Trauma, Trauma care

AcademyHealth. 2016. Which adverse childhood experiences are most predictive of health care costs among adults?. Washington, DC: AcademyHealth, 6 pp. (Rapid evidence review)

Annotation: This document synthesizes peer-reviewed systematic reviews on adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) associated with higher health care costs among adults. Contents include the policy context, supporting evidence, and limitations. Collectively, the studies included in the review report costs for three of 10 major ACEs: physical abuse, sexual abuse, and physical neglect. The appendices contain definitions of terms, search terms and databases used in the review, and a description of systematic reviews and relevant primary research studies included in the review.

Contact: AcademyHealth, 1150 17th Street, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 292-6700 Fax: (202) 292-6800 E-mail: info@academyhealth.org Web Site: http://www.academyhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adults, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Costs, Evaluation methods, Life course, Low income groups, Medicaid, Public policy, Research reviews, Stress, Trauma, Women

Schmitz CC, Cullen MJ. 2015. Evaluating interprofessional education and collaborative practice: What should I consider when selecting a measurement tool?. Minneapolis, MN: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, 33 pp.

Annotation: This primer provides basic information about good practices and processes in interprofessional-education- and collaborative-practice-measurement instruments and use. Topics include the importance of validity, five sources of validity evidence, how much validity an evaluation tool should have, and things to consider when selecting a tool. Appendices include a glossary of measurement tools, rules of thumb when appraising validity data, common threats to validity, and information on the National Center Resource Exchange.

Contact: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, Minneapolis, MN Web Site: http://nexusipe.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Evaluation, Evaluation methods, Interdisciplinary approach, Measures

Johnson K, Gustafson D, Ewigman B, Provost L, Roper R. 2015. Using rapid-cycle research to reach goals: Awareness, assessment, adaptation, acceleration. Rockville, MD: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 61 pp.

Annotation: This document for research teams conducting health services research in primary care and other health settings, quality improvement staff in health care settings, and physicians and other providers involved in practice-based research networks provides guidance on the use of and methods for conducting rapid-cycle research. It explores the breadth of methodologies conventionally associated with quality improvement in primary care settings, discusses the appropriateness of such strategies across evaluation objectives, and provides discussions about tools to accelerate the assessment-to-adoption cycle.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (301) 427-1364 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website. Document Number: AHRQ Pub. No. 15-0036.

Keywords: Diffusion of innovation, Evaluation, Evaluation methods, Primary care, Program improvement, Quality assurance, Research

Borrud L, Chiappa MM, Burt VL, Gahche J, Zipf G, Dohrmann SM, Johnson CL. 2014. National health and nutrition examination survey: National youth fitness survey plan, operations, and analysis, 2012. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 16 pp. (Vital and health statistics; Series 2, Data evaluation and methods research; no. 163)

Annotation: The report provides information about the plan, operations, and analysis of the first national-level survey to estimate the physical activity and fitness levels of children and adolescents ages 3-15 in the United States. Contents include information on the planning and sample design; ethical, privacy, and confidentiality considerations; field operations; mobile examination center operations; a report of findings and remuneration; and data release and analytic guidelines.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS Pub. No. 2014–1363.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Confidentiality, Data analysis, Data collection, Evaluation methods, National surveys, Physical activity, Physical fitness, Research design

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of the Associate Director for Policy. 2014. Using evaluation to inform CDC's policy process. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 22 pp.

Annotation: This document for public health professionals provides information on using evaluation to inform the policy process. Topics include identifying where you are in the policy process and focusing on evaluation, using logic models to describe policy efforts, gathering credible evidence, justifying conclusions, ensuring use of findings and sharing lessons learned, and using evaluation to inform the specific domains of the policy process. Examples are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation methods, Federal agencies, Health policy, Models, Policy development, Process evaluation, Public health

Soleimanpour S, Geierstanger S. 2014. Documenting the link between school-based health centers and academic success: A guide for the field. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 43 pp.

Annotation: This guide is designed to help school-based health center (SBHC) partners document the link between SBHC services, including oral health services, and academic indicators. The guide includes a review of the literature on the connection between health and academic achievement and strategies for demonstrating this link, ranging from simple, low-cost strategies to more in-depth methodologies. The advantages and disadvantages of each approach are discussed.

Contact: University of California, San Francisco, Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, 513 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0410, Telephone: (415) 476-5255 Web Site: http://healthpolicy.ucsf.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Data analysis, Data collection, Evaluation methods, Health status, Literature reviews, Program development, School age children, Surveys

Rural Assistance Center. [2013]. Rural oral health toolkit. Grand Forks, ND: Rural Assistance Center, 7 modules.

Annotation: These modules are designed to help professionals identify and implement an oral health program. Topics include an overview of oral health in rural communities, program models and ways to adapt them to meet community needs, and strategies to ensure program sustainability. The toolkit also includes a framework for evaluation, methods for disseminating results, and examples of programs that have been implemented in rural communities.

Contact: Rural Health Information Hub, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 501 North Columbia Road Stop 9037, Room 4520, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037, Telephone: (800) 270-1898 E-mail: info@ruralhealthinfo.org Web Site: https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation methods, Information dissemination, Measures, Model programs, Oral health, Program development, Resources for professionals, Rural environment

Riegelman RK. 2013. Studying a study and testing a test: reading evidence-based health research. (6th ed.). Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 324 pp., 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This book for students and practicing clinicians presents a step-by-step approach to thoughtful and critical reading of health research literature utilizing scenarios, checklists, and exercises. Section one focuses on study evaluation including design, assessment, analysis, interpretation, extrapolation, randomized trials, cohort studies, and meta-analysis. The second section discusses tests with topics in variability, reference interval, definitions, test comparisons, and screening. Section three covers rate sampling, standardization, sources, and compilation. The fourth section considers costs and evaluating effectiveness by study design, assessment, analysis, interpretation, and extrapolation. Section five gives an overview of basic principles of statistics, univariable, bivariable, and multivariable analyses, along with a flowchart summary. Each section concludes with a review/question summary. The book concludes with a glossary and index. A CD-ROM is included with interactive questions and answers that parallel each of the first four sections of the text.

Contact: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, P.O. Box 1620, Hagerstown, MD 21741, Telephone: (800) 638-3030 Secondary Telephone: (301) 223-23000 Fax: (301) 223-2400 E-mail: customerservice@lww.com Web Site: http://www.lww.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 0-7817-1860-0.

Keywords: Assessment, Audiovisual materials, CD-ROMs, Data analysis, Evaluation, Evaluation methods, Health services, Interactive media, Medicine, Research methodology, Statistics

American Academy of Pediatrics, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program. 2013. Evaluating your community-based program: Part I—Designing your evaluation (rev. ed). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 47 pp.

Annotation: This guide focuses on the roles evaluation plays in program design and improvement, the value of stakeholder input and involvement in the evaluation design, defining the program's desired outcome, creating a program logic model, and locating additional information for these topics. The guide includes case studies, a glossary, and an appendix with additional resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Child health programs, Community based services, Community programs, Evaluation methods, Program development

Matone M, Curtis C, Chesnokova A, Yun K, Kreider A, Curtis M, Rubin D. 2013. Evaluation of maternal and child home visitation programs: Lessons from Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, PA: PolicyLab, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 15 pp. (Evidence to action)

Annotation: This policy brief highlights key concepts to guide state and local maternal and child home visitation program administrators as they make decisions about ongoing or planned program evaluation, as well as strategies for addressing some of the challenges tied to real-world program evaluation. Topics include an overview of public health program evaluation, a short description of what was learned from PolicyLab's evaluation of the Pennsylvania Nurse-Family Partnership program, and a discussion of how the findings can be meaningful for the broader home-visitation community. Contents include data sources for quasi-experimental evaluation.

Contact: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104-4399, Telephone: (215) 590-1000 Web Site: http://www.chop.edu/consumer/index.jsp .

Keywords: Case studies, Child health, Evaluation methods, Home visiting, Maternal health, Pennsylvania, Program evaluation

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.