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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (313 total).

University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health. n.d.. Ethnicity and maternal and child health care. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 75 pp.

Annotation: This unpublished document contains a set of 4 teaching modules: (1) Ethnicity and Healthy Birth Outcomes; (2) Ethnicity and Genetic Disease; (3) Culture and AIDS Prevention in Adolescents; and (4) Using the Internet in Maternal and Child Health. Each of the modules contains lesson objectives; a suggested reading list followed by a section of summaries; and suggested assignments and class presentations geared towards the objectives discussed at the beginning of each module. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Maryland School of Social Work, Center for Maternal and Child Health Social Work Education, 525 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 706-7533 Fax: (410) 706-6046 Web Site: http://cmchswe.umaryland.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Disease prevention, Educational materials, Ethnic factors, Internet, MCH training, Maternal health

Calanan R, Elzinga-Marshall G, Gry D, Payne E, Mauritson K. 2018. Tooth be told: Colorado's basic screening survey—Children's oral health screening: 2016-17. Denver, CO: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environmenty, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report presents data from a survey of students in kindergarten and third grade in Colorado that included an oral health screening conducted during the 2016–2017 school year. The report provides an introduction to the survey and a summary of main findings; a description of the methodology; and results categorized by caries experience, untreated decay, treatment urgency, and sealants. Trends in oral health outcomes and in oral health disparities by race/ethnicity and school-level socioeconomic status are presented.

Contact: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 4300 Cherry Creek Drive, South, Denver, CO 80246, Telephone: (303) 692-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 886-7689 E-mail: cdphe.information@state.co.us Web Site: https://www.colorado.gov/cdphe Available from the website.

Keywords: Colorado, Ethnic factors, Oral health, Racial factors, School age children, Socioeconomic factors, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

Lorenzo SB, Wilhite BC. 2017. Health and health care for all: Resources for families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief presents resources for finding care, services and support and websites about health and health care for all families. Resources about the health of specific population groups are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Indians, Barriers, Bibliographies, Blacks, Cultural barriers, Electronic publications, Ethnic factors, Families, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Hotlines, Minority groups, Racial factors, Women

Epstein R, Gonzalez T. 2017. Gender & trauma: Somatic interventions for girls in juvenile justice–Implications for policy and practice. Washington, DC: Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a foundational understanding of the relationship between trauma and gender -- with a focus on system-involved girls -- and provides an analysis of somatic interventions. In particular, the report maps the ways in which trauma-informed, gender-responsive, and culturally competent yoga and mindfulness programs can address the short- and long-term impact of trauma on girls in the juvenile justice system. Topics include the core components of somatic interventions for traumatized girls, data documenting positive effects, and specific policy and practice recommendations to increase access for system-involved girls.

Contact: Georgetown Law, Center on Poverty and Inequality, 600 New Jersey Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 661-6692 E-mail: povertycenter@law.georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.law.georgetown.edu/academics/centers-institutes/poverty-inequality/index.cfm Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent females, Culturally competent services, Ethnic factors, Intervention, Juvenile justice, Policy development, Sexuality, Therapeutics, Trauma care

Public Counsel. 2017. Assuring equitable funding of services for children with developmental disabilities. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 100 pp.

Annotation: This report analyzes purchase of services authorization data for race, ethnic, and language group disparities for infants, children, and youth from birth to age 21 in California; discusses possible root causes; and makes recommendations for addressing the disparities. Contents include background, 25 years of research studies on service disparities, data reporting requirements and compliance, study methodology and approach, a summary of findings, detailed results, recommendations, conclusion, and next steps.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, Adolescents, Barriers, California, Children, Developmental disabilities, Ethnic factors, Financing, Geographic factors, Infants, Language, Legal issues, Policy analysis, State legislation

American College of Rheumatology, Lupus Foundation of America. 2017. Be Fierce. Take Control™. Atlanta, GA: American College of Rheumatology; Washington, DC: Lupus Foundation of America, multiple items.

Annotation: This public health campaign website was launched with the goal of educating and empowering young African American and Latino women (including those ages 15-18), who are most at-risk for developing lupus, to be aware of it signs and symptoms. The campaign uses the web, social media, digital advertising, and audience engagement to reach young women and educate them about the signs and symptoms of lupus. The campaign website also provides tools and resources such as the Lupus Foundation of America’s “Could it Be Lupus?” interactive questionnaire so those with possible symptoms can learn how to take that next step and talk to their health care provider.

Contact: Lupus Foundation of America, 2000 L Street, N.W., Suite 410, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 349-1155 Secondary Telephone: (800) 558-0121 Fax: (202) 349-1156 Web Site: http://www.lupus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, African Americans, Autoimmune diseases, Early intervention programs, Empowerment, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Lupus erythematosus, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns, Reproductive health, Risk factors, Self care, Women's health

Byrne JV, Lee PA. 2017. Health disparities in the Medi-Cal population: Dental visits during pregnancy. Sacramento, CA: California Department of Public Health and California Department of Health Care Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet focuses on oral health during pregnancy among women in California. It discusses the importance of good oral health during pregnancy and provides statistics on rates of oral health visits during pregnancy for women ages 15 and older as well as for those who have private health insurance and those who participate in Medi-Cal.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Sacramento, CA Telephone: (916) 558-1784 Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to care, California, Ethnic factors, Oral health, Pregnant women, Racial factors, State surveys

Colorado Center for Health and Environmental Data. [2016]. Colorado oral health surveillance system plan 2016-2020. Denver, CO: Colorado Center for Health and Environmental Data, 20 pp.

Center for Global Policy Solutions. 2016. Overlooked but not forgotten: Social Security lifts millions more children out of poverty. Washington, DC: Center for Global Policy Solutions, 33 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a study to expand existing research about Social Security's indirect role in lifting children out of poverty by examining the effect on those living in extended households. It documents how the multi-generational impact of Social Security has grown and how it has provided an important and increasing income source across different racial and ethnic groups. Policy implications are included.

Contact: Center for Global Policy Solutions, 1300 L Street, N.W., Suite 975, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 265-5111 Fax: (202) 265-5118 E-mail: info@globalpolicysolutions.org Web Site: http://globalpolicysolutions.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Ethnic factors, Family income, Federal programs, Intergenerational programs, Policy development. , Poverty, Racial factors, Social Security, Trends

Delta Dental of Kentucky and Kentucky Youth Advocates. 2016. Making Smiles Happen®: 2016 oral health study of Kentucky's children. Jefferson, KY: Kentucky Youth Advocates, 47 pp.

Annotation: This report presents the results of a statewide oral health screening of students in third and sixth grades in public elementary and middle schools in Kentucky and compares them to earlier results. Topics include percentages of students in need of early or urgent oral health care, those with untreated tooth decay, and those with and without dental sealants by race and ethnicity. Additional topics include percentages of students eligible for free or reduced-price school lunch who have experienced a toothache or tooth decay and those who visited the dentist in the past year.

Contact: Making Smiles Happen, Kentucky Youth Advocates, 1101 Bluegrass Parkway, Suite 100, Jefferson, KY 40299, Telephone: (502) 895-8167 E-mail: info@KentuckyOralHealth.com Web Site: http://www.kentuckyoralhealth.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Dental caries, Dental sealants, Ethnic groups, Kentucky, Low income groups, Oral health, Racial factors, Screening, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

Healthy Youth Development Prevention Research Center. 2016. 2016 Minnesota adolescent sexual health report. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the sexual health of adolescents in Minnesota. Contents include adolescent pregnancy and birth statistics for the period 1990–2014, including information about trends in adolescent pregnancy and birth, national comparison, and subsequent births. Additional topics include geographic and racial/ethnic disparities in adolescent pregnancy, birth, and sexually transmitted infections; sexual orientation; and adverse childhood experiences.

Contact: University of Minnesota, Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health, Department of Pediatrics, 717 Delaware Street, S.E., 3rd Floor, Minneapolis, MN 55414-2959, Telephone: (612) 626-2134 Fax: (612) 6264-0997 Web Site: https://www.pediatrics.umn.edu/divisions/general-pediatrics-and-adolescent-health Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Childbirth, Ethnic factors, Geographic factors, Health disparities, Minnesota, Risk taking, Sexual health, Sexually transmitted diseases, Statistical data, Trends

March of Dimes Perinatal Data Center. 2015. 2015 premature birth report card. [White Plains, NY]: March of Dimes, 4 pp.

Annotation: This annual report card measures the progress in reducing the nation's preterm birth rate by comparing each state's rate to the goal. Topics include prevention strategies and recommendations. Topics include women who are uninsured, late preterm birth, women who smoke, and preterm birth rates by race and ethnicity. Indicators, definitions, and data sources for the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico are included. Information about the grading methodology is also provided. State fact sheets are also available.

Contact: March of Dimes, 1275 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, NY 10605, Telephone: (914) 997-4488 Secondary Telephone: Web Site: http://www.marchofdimes.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Data sources, Ethnic factors, Premature infants, Prematurity, Preterm birth, Prevention, State surveys, Statistical data, Trends

Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program. 2015. Texas oral health and Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Austin, TX: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Program, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document presents findings on the relationship between preventive oral health care use and health behaviors among students in grades 9-12 in Texas. Contents include the percentage of students lacking dental visits within the past year by age; race/ethnicity; risk-taking behavior (drinking soda, tobacco use, marijuana use); and healthy behavior (physical activity and good school grades).

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, Oral Health Improvement Program, P.O. Box 149347, Mail Code 1818, Austin, TX 78714-9347, Telephone: (512) 776-2008 Fax: (512) 776-7256 E-mail: dental@dshs.state.tx.us Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us/dental/default.shtm Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescents, Age factors, Children, Comparative analysis, Dental care, Ethnic factors, Health behavior, Health care disparities, Health care utilization, National surveys, Nutrition, Oral health, Preventive health services, Risk taking, State surveys, Statistical data, Texas, Tobacco, Young adults

New Mexico Department of Health, Office of Injury Prevention. 2015. New Mexico: Sexual violence free–A statewide strategic plan for the primary prevention of sexual violence 2015–2020. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Department of Health, Office of Injury Prevention, 66 pp.

Annotation: This document for agencies, organizations, universities, community coalitions, policymakers, prevention professionals, and other individuals interested in reducing the burden of sexual violence in New Mexico provides a framework for moving primary prevention forward. Contents include background on sexual violence and active consent, the causes and costs of sexual violence and how to prevent it, societal factors that contribute to sexual assault, priority populations, the system for responding to sexual violence in New Mexico, and a summary of progress. Methods, results, focus groups with a subset of priority populations, conclusion, and goals and objectives are included.

Contact: New Mexico Department of Health, 1190 South Saint Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505, Telephone: (505) 827-2613 Fax: (505) 827-2530 E-mail: doh-webmaster@state.nm.us Web Site: https://nmhealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Costs, Ethnic groups, Injury prevention, Minority groups, New Mexico, Primary prevention, Risk factors, Rural populations, Sexual assault, Strategic plans, Violence prevention, Women

DeNavas-Walt C, Proctor BD. 2014. Income and poverty in the United States: 2013. Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau; for sale by U.S. Government Printing Office, 61 pp. (Current population reports; P60-249)

Annotation: This report presents data on income and poverty in the United States based on information collected in the 2014 and earlier Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplements. The report contains two main sections: one focuses on income and the other on poverty. Each section presents estimates by characteristics such as race, Hispanic origin, nativity, and region. Other topics, such as earnings and family poverty rates are included only in the relevant section.

Contact: U.S. Census Bureau, 4600 Silver Hill Road, Washington, DC 20233, Telephone: (301) 763-4748 E-mail: webmaster@census.gov Web Site: http://www.census.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Ethnic factors, Family income, Geographic factors, Poverty, Statistical data, Surveys

Damiano PC, Park KH, Robinson EL. 2014. Health disparities among children in Iowa: Results from the 2010 Iowa Child and Family Household Health Survey. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa Public Policy Center, 30 pp., plus tables

Annotation: This report presents findings from the 2010 Iowa Child and Family Household Health survey completed by parents of infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 17. The report analyzes racial and ethnic health disparities and reports significant differences in the health status of Iowa's parents and children based on race and ethnicity. The report examines overall health status, oral health, and children with special health care needs (CSHCN). It also compares health insurance coverage; participation in a medical home; parental health and neighborhood characteristics; lifestyle and behavior (including screen time, nutrition, and physical activity); and issues such as access to care, preventive care, and behavioral and emotional health. Graphs provided throughout the report reflect disparities between Hispanic, White, African-American, and Asian and Pacific Island populations.

Contact: University of Iowa, Public Policy Center, 310 South Grand Avenue, 209 South Quadrangle, Iowa City, IA 52242, Telephone: (319) 335-6800 Fax: (319) 335-6801 Web Site: http://ppc.uiowa.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Ethnic factors, Families, Health status disparities, Iowa, Racial factors, Reports, State initiatives, State surveys

Leadership for Healthy Communities. 2014. Overweight and obesity among African American youths. Washington, DC: Leadership for Healthy Communities, 4 pp.

Leadership for Healthy Communities. 2014. Overweight and obesity among Latino youths. Washington, DC: Leadership for Healthy Communities, 5 pp.

My Brother's Keeper Task Force. 2014. My Brother's Keeper Task Force report to the president. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report describes progress on a national initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color. The report outlines the building blocks for success across key life stages and presents initial recommendations and areas of opportunity for each of the key milestones. The focus areas include entering school ready to learn, reading at grade level by third grade, graduating from high school ready for college and career, completing postsecondary education or training, entering the work force, reducing violence, and providing a second chance. Cross-cutting areas of opportunity that span all focus areas are also discussed.

Contact: White House, Executive Office of the President, Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent males, Barriers, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Graduation, Juvenile justice, Learning, Life course, Men, Minority groups, Reading, School to work transition, Social factors, Violence prevention, Work family issues, Work force, Young adults

Desiderio G, Garrido M, Garcia M, Eisler A. 2014. Lessons learned in providing health care services for Native youth. Baltimore, MD: Healthy Teen Network, 7 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes agency efforts to provide health care services for Native youth and their lessons learned. Topics include health issues Native youth commonly face, ways youth use health services, youth-friendly services and ways to provide them, and integrating Native culture and traditional practices with medical practice. The report concludes with a discussion of areas and issues that need to be addressed in order to increase the number of youth accessing services, as well as suggestions for other agencies and clinics trying to establish health services for Native youth.

Contact: Healthy Teen Network, 1501 Saint Paul Street, Suite 124, Baltimore, MD 21202, Telephone: (410) 685-0410 Fax: (410) 687-0481 E-mail: info@healthyteennetwork.org Web Site: http://www.healthyteennetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska Natives, American Indians, Barriers, Cultural factors, Culturally competent services, Ethnic groups, Health care utilization, Health services delivery, Service integration, Youth

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.