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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (36 total).

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. n.d.. A family guide—20 easy steps to personal environmental health now. Research Triangle Park, NC: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides simple steps that families can take to make their environment healthier. Topics include label reading, noise, carbon monoxide alarms, child safety, job hazards, allergies, water pollution, lead, radon, overheating, ozone, handwashing, healthy eating, tobacco products, and sun exposure.

Contact: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD K3-16, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2233, Telephone: (919) 541-3345 Fax: (919) 541-4395 E-mail: webcenter@niehs Web Site: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/ Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Allergies, Chemicals, Child health, Environment, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Families, Lead poisoning, Radon, Safety, Sun exposure, Water pollution

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 2019. Advice about eating fish: For women who are or might become pregnant, breastfeeding mothers, and young children. [Silver Spring, MD]: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 2 pp.

Annotation: This chart is designed to help pregnant women and parents choose which fish to eat, and how often to eat them, based on their mercury levels. Contents include best choices (lowest levels of mercury), good choices, and choices to avoid (highest mercury levels) and the number of servings per day. A description of serving sizes for adults and young children (ages 4 to 7) is included.

Contact: U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20993, Telephone: (888) 463-6332 Fax: (301) 443-3100 Web Site: http://www.fda.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Children, Consumer education materials, Decision making, Environmental exposures, Environmental pollution, Nutrition, Parents, Pregnant women, Reproductive hazards

Phurisamban R, Gleick P. 2017. Drinking fountains and public health: Improving national water infrastructure to rebuild trust and ensure access. Oakland, CA: Pacific Institute, 13 pp.

Annotation: This paper summarizes epidemiology reports and other evidence of drinking fountain-related health issues to reveal the extent of the problem and explores changes needed to improve the quality and use of this hydration option. Topics include a brief history of water fountains, evidence of contamination at water fountains such as microbial and heavy metal contamination, the Safe Drinking Water Act and national drinking water standards, and guidelines for cleaning and maintaining drinking water fountains. The paper concludes with a discussion of efforts needed to expand the science and practice of ensuring that drinking fountains remain clean, safe, and accessible.

Contact: Pacific Institute, 654 13th Street, Preservation Park, Oakland, CA Telephone: (510) 251-1600 Fax: (510) 251-2203 Web Site: http://www.pacinst.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-893790-77-3.

Keywords: Community base services, Environmental exposure, Federal legislation, Guidelines, Policy development, Public health infrastructure, Regulations, Safety, Standards, Water, Water pollution

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 2015. Energy savings plus health: Indoor air quality guidelines for school building upgrades. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 125 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines are designed to assist school administrators and others in protecting and improving indoor air quality (IAQ) in schools during building upgrades, particularly energy efficiency upgrades and building renovation activities. Contents include fundamental principles of IAQ, the business case for integrating energy efficiency and IAQ, and assessment protocols and recommended actions. Topics include project planning and integrated design; moisture and mold; hazardous materials; indoor and outdoor contaminants and sources; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; and safety. The appendices contain information about project planning and developing a project team, communication and education, and worker protection. A master verification checklist is also included.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20460, Telephone: (202) 272-0167 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Assessment, Environmental exposure, Facility design and construction, Planning, Protocols, Safety, School age children, Schools

Braff-Guajardo E, Hecht K. 2015. Kids and drinking water: A glass half full or half empty?. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 3 pp. (Views from the field)

Annotation: This paper discusses the importance of children drinking water. Contents include information about the importance of water consumption in preventing chronic disease; obstacles to ensuring that students have access to clean, safe drinking water in schools; drinking water challenges in communities; and opportunities for health funders to increase children’s access to and consumption of free, safe drinking water. Topics include improving access, prioritizing education, funding data collection and research, promoting multisectoral partnerships, and advocating for supportive policies. A policy framework to support healthy development in all children by investing in accessible, safe drinking water is included. .

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Child health, Child safety, Community role, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Financing, Fluid intake, Health promotion, Low income groups, Minority groups, Nutrition, Policy development, Public private partnerships, School role, Water

Currie J, Zivin JSG, Meckel K, Neidell MJ, Schlenker W. 2013. Something in the water: Contaminated drinking water and infant health. Cambridge, Ma: National Bureau of Economic Research, 30 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18876)

Annotation: This paper provides estimates of the effects of in utero exposure to contaminated drinking water on fetal health. The study examined birth records and drinking water testing results for the state of New Jersey from 1997 to 2007 to compare outcomes across siblings who were potentially exposed to differing levels of harmful contaminants from drinking water while in utero. Topics include an overview of research on air and water pollution on fetal development; study methodology and its difficulties; a discussion of maternal characteristics of mobility and education during the study; exposure to water contamination and its effects on low birth weight, prematurity, and other birth outcomes; and conclusions on further research.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Environmental exposure, Fetal development, Infant health, New Jersey, State surveys, Water pollution

Currie J, Zivin JSG, Mullins J, Beidell MJ. 2013. What do we know about short and long term effects of early life exposure to pollution?. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 41 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19571)

Annotation: This paper reviews the economic research that brings together literatures on the effects of pollution exposure early in life on near-term health and on the influence of early childhood health on health and human capital later in life. The paper begins with a conceptual model that highlights the core relationships across the life cycle and then reviews the literature concerned with such estimates, focusing in particular on identifying strategies to mitigate concerns about endogenous exposure. Also discussed are potential policy implications and promising avenues for future research.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adult health, Air pollution, Child health, Environmental exposure, Environmental pollution, Infant health, Infants, Public policy, Research, Water pollution, Young children

Axelrad D et al. 2013. America's children and the environment (3rd ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 494 pp.

Annotation: This report presents data on children's environmental health. Topics include (1) environments and contaminants such as air, indoor, drinking water, chemicals in food, contaminated lands, and climate change; (2) biomonitoring, such as lead, mercury, pcbs, and others; and (3) health concerns such as respiratory diseases, childhood cancer, neurodevelopomental disorders, obesity, and adverse birth outcomes. The report also covers birth defects and contaminants in schools and child care facilities. An appendix also describes the alignment of these indicators with Healthy People 2020 objectives.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20460, Telephone: (202) 272-0167 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Chemicals, Child health, Congenital abnormalities, Disease, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Lead, Pesticides, Water pollution, Women's health

American Lung Association. 2012. State of the air. New York, NY: American Lung Association, annual.

Annotation: This report assigns U.S. counties a grade of "A" through "F" based on how often their air quality in a given county crossed into the unhealthful categories of the Environmental Protection Agency's air quality index for ground-level ozone (smog) and particle pollution. The report, which comprises text, tables, and figures, contains the following sections: an executive summary and introduction, grading the risk, nationwide and regional analyses, adverse health effects of ozone and particle pollution, protecting the nation from ozone, and concludes with a section of endnotes. The report also includes four appendices: (1) description of methodology, (2) regional differences in ozone, (3) additional comparison tables, and (4) state data tables.

Contact: American Lung Association, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 785-3355 Secondary Telephone: (800) 548-8252 Fax: (202) 452-1805 E-mail: info@lungusa.org Web Site: http://www.lungusa.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Air pollution, Data, Environmental health, National surveys, State surveys, Statistics

Etzel RA, Balk SJ,, eds. and American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Environmental Health. 2012. Pediatric environmental health (3rd ed.). [Elk Grove, IL]: American Academy of Pediatrics, 934 pp.

Annotation: This book, designed to be used by practicing pediatricians, offers information on the role of the environment in the illnesses of childhood and adolescence. The book is organized into five sections. Section 1 offers background information including developmental toxicity, breastfeeding, how to take an environmental history, and how to do a home inventory of environmental hazards. Sections 2 and 3 focus on chemical and physical hazards and on specific environments such as child care settings, preconceptual and prenatal exposures, schools, waste sites, and workplaces. Section 4 addresses a variety of environmental situations including arts and crafts, asthma, cancer, chemical-biological terrorism, environmental disparities, multiple chemical sensitivities, antibiotics in animal agriculture, and environmental threats in developing countries. Section 5 provides information on communicating about environmental hazards. Boxes, figures, and tables present statistical and other information throughout the book. Also included are six appendices, including the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP's) policy statements and technical reports, resources for environmental health, curricula for environmental education in schools, chairs of the AAP committee on environmental health, AAP patient education materials, and more. The book concludes with an index.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Document Number: ISBN 9781581106534.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Asthma, Chemicals, Child health, Environment, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental influences, Environmental pollution, Hazards, Pediatricians, Reference materials

Healthy Schools Network. 2012. Molds at school. Albany, NY: Healthy Schools Network, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about molds and the potential impact of molds on children's health. Topics include types of mold; symptoms of exposure to mold in children; allergies, asthma, and mold; monitoring, prevention, and cleanup tips; and tips on remediation for school officials, parents, and school personnel.

Contact: Healthy Schools Network, 773 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208, Telephone: (518) 462-0632 Fax: (518) 462-0433 E-mail: info@healthyschools.org Web Site: http://www.healthyschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Allergies, Asthma, Environmental exposure, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Hazards, Respiratory diseases, Risk factors, School age children, Schools, Testing, Toxic disorders

Currie J. 2011. Inequality at birth: Some causes and consequences. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 42 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16798)

Annotation: This paper offers evidence on the issue of whether families with low incomes and those who are members of minority groups are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards. The paper reviews some evidence about the determinants of health at birth and focuses in particular on prenatal exposure to pollution. Topics include endowments at birth and future outcomes and health at birth and environmental justice.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Educational attainment, Environmental influences, Environmental pollution, Families, Infant health, Low birthweight, Low income groups, Racial factors

Knittel CR, Miller DL, Sanders NJ. 2011. Caution drivers! Children present: Traffic, pollution, and infant health. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 17222)

Annotation: This paper examines the impact of modern air pollution levels on infant health and the impact of automobile driving on ambient air pollution levels. The authors pull from four separate data sets to investigate the relationships between traffic, weather, pollution, and infant outcomes, focusing their research primarily on the Central Valley and southern portions of California. The findings suggest that ambient pollution levels have an impact on infant mortality rates. The results, which are presented in the form of tables and figures, also illustrate the significance of weather controls in measuring pollution’s impact on infant mortality.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Air pollution, Environmental factors, Environmental pollution, Infant health, Infant mortality, Research, Traffic

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. 2011. Addressing new challenges in children's environmental health. Research Triangle Park, NC: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about research programs conducted by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences to address children's health issues. Programs summarized are divided into the following categories: disease prevention; studies on the growing brain, studies on air pollution and respiratory disease, studies on reproduction, and studies on breast cancer.

Contact: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, P.O. Box 12233, MD K3-16, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2233, Telephone: (919) 541-3345 Fax: (919) 541-4395 E-mail: webcenter@niehs Web Site: http://www.niehs.nih.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Asthma, Autism, Breast cancer, Child health, Cognitive development, Environmental influences, Mental health, Prevention, Programs, Reproductive health, Research

Bachrach A, Higgins LB, Stagman S. 2010. Environmental health in early childhood systems building: Opportunities for states. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 41 pp. (Brief)

Annotation: This brief identifies some of the substances that threaten young children inside and nearby their homes or early care and learning settings. It describes the importance of early intervention for disease prevention, and provides examples of strategic approaches to improve regional and program policy related to environmental health. The brief describes common household and community and environmental health hazards and the major health risks associated with exposure to them. It provides examples from states that have made significant progress and explores specific actions states can take to successfully address environmental health issues affecting children.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Early intervention, Environmental health, Environmental pollution, Policy, Program improvement, Young children

U.S. Office of the Surgeon General. 2009. The Surgeon General's call to action to promote healthy homes. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report discusses the factors that influence health and safety in the home and the steps that people can take to prevent injury, disability, and disease that may result from an unhealthy housing environment. The report addresses (1) the need for healthy homes; (2) the connection between health and homes; (3) promoting healthy homes through prevention; (4) homes and health research; and (5) translating research into practical application and policy. Among the topics covered are air quality, water quality, residential chemicals, housing structure and design, elevated lead levels, structural deficiencies, mental health, access disparities, housing instability, and homelessness. A series of coordinated action steps call on individuals, families, educators, scientists, businesses, agencies, and organizations, to join in a discussion about healthy home issues; to make informed decisions; and to develop imaginative and realistic solutions that will help ensure that safe, healthy, affordable, and accessible homes are available to everyone in the United States. Related materials include materials from the launch of this program, actions for consumers, a checklist, resources, and a strategic plan.

Contact: U.S. Office of the Surgeon General, Tower Building, Plaza Level 1, Room 100, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 276-8853 Fax: (240) 453-6141 Web Site: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Air pollution, Building codes, Environmental health, Hazards, Household safety, Housing, Public health, Public policy, Risk factors

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals and Physicians for Social Responsibility. 2008. Fish consumption to promote good health and minimize contaminants: A quick reference guide for clinicians [upd. ed.]. Washington, DC: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 17 pp.

Annotation: This reference guide for health professionals reviews the scientific evidence on fish contaminants and provides guidelines on fish consumption based on the available evidence. Topics include mercury levels in commercial fish and shellfish and PCBs in freshwater and coastal fish, state and regional fish consumption advisories, the omega 3 content of fish and seafood, and a summary of fish consumption guidelines for women of childbearing age (including adolescent girls) and for children under age 12. A list of web-based resources and references are included. A brochure titled Healthy Fish, Healthy Families, which was adapted from the guide is also available in English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese.

Contact: Association of Reproductive Health Professionals, 1901 L Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 466-3825 E-mail: arhp@arhp.org Web Site: http://www.arhp.org Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Cardiovascular diseases, Child development, Child health, Environmental pollution, Food consumption, Food safety, Infant development, Infant health, Pregnancy, Women's health

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 2006. A framework for assessing health risks of environmental exposures to children. Washington, DC: U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, 131 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this report is to provide an overarching framework for a more complete assessment of children's exposure to environmental agents and the resulting potential health risks. The report outlines the phases for assessing the risk of exposure to environmental agents singly or in combination. In addition, the report uses existing sources for more detailed information that are references and, when possible, linked. The report incorporates information from such sources while focusing on inherent and acquired susceptibility at different life stages (e.g., childhood and adulthood). A glossary and references are included.

Contact: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Ariel Rios Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20460, Telephone: (202) 272-0167 Web Site: http://www2.epa.gov/children Document Number: EPA/600/R-05/093F.

Keywords: Child health, Environmental exposure, Environmental influences, Environmental pollution, High risk children, Public policy

Learning Disabilities Association of America, National Education Association, and Arc. [2005]. Mercury and learning disabilities: A parent's guide. [Pittsburgh, PA]: Learning Disabilities Association of America, 9 pp.

Annotation: This guide for parents discusses learning disabilities, how to prevent them, and how to reduce their children's risk of exposure to mercury, and thus, possibly, to reduce possible learning disabilites. The guide discusses the causes of learning disabilities, where mercury comes from, and how it affects children. The guide also includes advice for parents, guidelines for identifying learning disabilities, and information about how to test a child for learning disabilities.

Contact: Learning Disabilities Association of America, 4156 Library Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15234-1349, Telephone: (412) 341-1515 Fax: (412) 344-0224 E-mail: info@LDAAmerica.org Web Site: http://www.ldaamerica.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chemicals, Children, Consumer education materials, Environmental exposure, Environmental pollution, Learning disabilities, Prevention, Screening tests

Savitz DA, Singer PC, Hartmann KE, Herring AJ, Weinberg HS. 2005. Drinking water disinfection by-products and pregnancy outcome. Denver, CO: Awwa Research Foundation, 212 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a study to address the question of whether exposure to elevated levels of drinking water disinfection by-products is associated with adverse pregnancy outcome such as pregnancy loss, preterm birth, and reduced fetal growth. The report, which includes an executive summary, is divided into the following chapters: (1) background to study, (2) study methodology, (3) methods for assignment of exposure, (4) pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes assessment, (5) statistical methods, (6) results, (7) interpretation, (8) analyses of live birth outcomes, and (9) blood biomarker study. An appendix, references, and a list of abbreviations are included.

Contact: Awwa Research Foundation, 6666 West Quincy Avenue, Denver, CO 80235-3098, Telephone: (303) 347-6100 Fax: (303) 730-0851 E-mail: info@awwarf.org Web Site: http://www.awwarf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Disinfection, Environmental influences, Pregnancy, Pregnancy complications, Pregnancy loss, Pregnancy outcome, Teratology, Water pollution

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.