Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 10 (10 total).

National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation. 2011. Building a stronger evidence base for employee wellness programs. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation, 20 pp. (Meeting brief)

Annotation: This report summarizes discussion from a National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation meeting held in May 2010 to develop an agenda to guide the future research needed to encourage and help employers and other program adopters to implement evidence-based wellness programs. The report addresses research that is still needed, ways to improve program evaluations and develop a more robust and accessible body of evidence, and opportunities to move the agenda forward. What is meant by employee wellness programs and what is already known about them is also discussed.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Employee assistance programs, Employer initiatives, Health, Program evaluation, Programs, Research

Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy. 2007. Employee benefits study for CSHCN: [Final report]. [Boston, MA]: Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a 2001-2006 study to examine employer-sponsored benefits systems and workplace supports as they relate to employees who have children with special health care needs (CSHCN). Topics include how such benefits were structured, how employers ad purchasers understand the employees' needs for their CSHCN, opportunities for improvements in workplace supports, and how Title V programs can engage employers to improve services to CSHCN. The report contains an executive summary, a description of project goals and objectives, key findings, project implementation, and sustainability and replication. Additional information is provided on products developed during the project and a summary of recommendations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Final reports, Health care financing, Parent support services, Work family issues, Working parents

Rees C, Finch R. 2004. Health improvement: A comprehensive guide to designing, implementing, and evaluating worksite programs. Washington, DC: Center for Prevention and Health Services, National Business Group on Health, 15 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This guide is for employers interested in health improvement, regardless of whether the company is looking to design a new program altogether or thinking about options to improve or expand existing programs. It provides the following: (1) information on the structure of health improvement programs, (2) the business case for health improvement, (3) examples of best practices, and (4) the means for evaluation. A summary is provided as well as tips and resources for employers. References are also included.

Contact: National Business Group on Health, 20 F Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20001-6700, Telephone: (202) 558-3000 Fax: (202) 628-9244 E-mail: info@businessgrouphealth.org Web Site: http://www.businessgrouphealth.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Fiscal management, Models, Program development, Program evaluation, Workplace health promotion

Robinson G, Chimento L, Bush S, Papay J. 2001. Comprehensive mental health insurance benefits: Case studies. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Mental Health Services , 80 pp. (Special report)

Annotation: This report focuses on in-depth case studies of six employers, two health maintenance organizations (HMOs), and one managed behavioral healthcare organization (MBHO) in an effort to provide examples for other companies and managed care organizations to consider when developing their own programs. The report includes an overview and background information, a description of the methodology used in selected the case study sites, and sections on findings from employers and HMOs and the MBHO. Key findings include characteristics of the study participants, the mental health benefits provided, benefit management approaches, employee satisfaction and performance data, examples of best practices, and challenges remaining. Appendices include the advisory panel roster, list of study participants, employer case studies, and managed care organization case studies. References conclude the report.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website. Document Number: DHHS SMA 01-3481.

Keywords: Case studies, Comprehensive health care, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Health maintenance organizations, Managed care, Mental health, Program descriptions

Galinsky E, Bond JT. 1998. The 1998 business work-life study: A sourcebook. New York, NY: Families and Work Institute, 84 pp.

Annotation: This survey reports on company-provided work-life assistance programs for employees. Topics discussed include flexible work arrangements such as hours or work at home, leave policies, child and/or elder care assistance, employee assistance programs for family issues, supportiveness of supervisors and workplace culture, company efforts to develop supportive supervisors, health of employees and their families, benefits to enhance economic security, and company involvement in community life. Numerous tables of statistics are provided.

Contact: Families and Work Institute, 267 Fifth Avenue, Floor 2, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 465-2044 Fax: (212) 465-8637 Web Site: http://www.familiesandwork.org Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-888324-26-0.

Keywords: Child care, Community participation, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Family support programs, Work family issues, Working hours

DC Family Policy Seminar. 1997. The child care crisis in the District of Columbia: Can (or should) business fill the gap?. Washington, DC: Georgetown University, Graduate Public Policy Program; Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 30 pp. (DC Family Policy Seminar background briefing report)

Annotation: This report provides a brief introduction to issues addressed by a DC Family Policy Seminar in March 1997 that focused on child care issues in the District of Columbia and aimed to provide research and program intervention on how businesses may assist in solving the current child care crisis. Volume 1 (written by Helena Wallin and edited by Donna Ruane Morrison and Shelley Stark) provides an introduction and background of the increased need for affordable quality care in the nation and in the District, presents research concerning the effects of family-friendly employee benefits on employer's bottom line, highlights innovative family-friendly business practices, and links the federal government's current role in encouraging employer response to this issue. Volume 2 provides highlights of the seminar's discussions. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Business, Child care, District of Columbia, Employee assistance programs, Employer initiatives, Family support

Galinsky E, Friedman DF. 1993. Education before school: Investing in quality child care. New York, NY: Scholastic, 194 pp.

Annotation: This monograph, commissioned by the Committee for Economic Development, views child care as a important opportunity to foster the healthy development and education of all children from the earliest stages of life. The strong link between the quality of children's early care and education, and the possibility of school reform, is highlighted. The problems, benefits, and costs of typical child care are examined, as well as the response from government and business.

Contact: Families and Work Institute, 267 Fifth Avenue, Floor 2, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 465-2044 Fax: (212) 465-8637 Web Site: http://www.familiesandwork.org Available in libraries.

Keywords: Business, Child care, Child care workers, Child development centers, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits

Neal MB, Chapman NJ, Ingersoll-Dayton B, Emlen AC. 1993. Balancing work and caregiving for children, adults, and elders. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, 292 pp. (Family caregiver applications series; v. 3)

Annotation: This book explores how employees with caregiver roles juggle the responsibilities of work and family. The authors consider multiple factors that contribute to the experience of stress and work-related outcomes such as absenteeism; review policies, benefits, and services from the perspectives of the employee and the employer; analyze methods for assessing employee needs; and provide recommendations for national and local policies.

Contact: Sage Publications, 2455 Teller Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-2218, Telephone: (805) 499-9774 Secondary Telephone: (800)818-7243 Fax: (805) 499-0871 E-mail: order@sagepub.com Web Site: http://www.sagepub.com Available in libraries.

Keywords: Caregivers, Child care, Children with special health care needs, Employee assistance programs, Employee benefits, Out of home care, Working parents

U.S. Center for Mental Health Services. 1992-. Mental health, United States. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Mental Health Services, and National Institute of Mental Health, biennial.

Annotation: This report presents statistics on all aspects of mental health in the United States. Sections include (1) looking back, looking forward; (2) supporting good decision-making; (3) population dynamics; (4) insurance for mental health care; (5) status of mental health services; and (6) national mental health statistics. Additional topics include the prevalence and use of mental health services for adults and children in the U.S.; an overview of public and private health insurance, and federal employees health benefits program, and employee assistance programs; organized mental health services; specialty mental health care programs; and an overview of mental health practitioners and trainees. The appendices provide information on the sources and qualifications of data used within the report.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Employee assistance programs, Health care financing, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Mental health, Mental health services, Statistics, United States

U.S. Department of Labor. 1991. What works: Workplaces without alcohol and other drugs. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Department of Labor, 66 pp. (OSAP prevention library; no. 1)

Annotation: This report for employers describes the problems of substance abuse in the workplace and outlines programs of education, training, testing, and assistance, for prevention and treatment of abuse by employees. Extensive appendices present models of workplace substance abuse policies and employee assistance programs; describe the legal issues surrounding drug testing by employers; and reproduce fact sheets on various types of drugs. A two-page list of resource organizations is also included.

Keywords: Corporate programs, Employee assistance programs, Model programs, Program descriptions, Substance abuse prevention, Substance abuse treatment, Workplace health promotion

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.