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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (20 total).

Wehman P. 2013. Life beyond the classroom: Transition strategies for young people with disabilities. (5th ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing, 576 pp.

Annotation: This book is geared toward helping students, instructors, and professionals in rehabilitation programs define, plan, facilitate, and support transition for young people with disabilities into adulthood and independent living. The book is divided into three major sections: (1) defining and planning transition, (2) facilitating and supporting transition, and (3) designing and implementing individualized transition plans. Topics also include secondary school restructuring, college and other postsecondary alternatives, assistive technology to enhance transition and work, and recent legislative acts in the field. Each chapter contains a list of learning objectives, a conclusion, and study questions. Figures and tables throughout the book provide statistical data, sample forms and checklists, and additional information to illustrate needs and capabilities. Appendices are provided with selected chapters. References and an index conclude the book

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com Available in libraries. Document Number: ISBN 1-55766-476-5.

Keywords: Adolescents with developmental disabilities, Assessment, Assistive devices, Brain injuries, Careers, Children with special health care needs, Cognition disorders, College bound students, College students, Emotional instability, Families, High school students, Parent participation, Postsecondary education, School to work transitions, Transition planning, Transition to independent living, Vocational education

Allen KD, Hendricks T. 2013. Medicaid and children in foster care. Washington DC: First Focus, 14 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides information about the health care needs of children in foster care and the role of Medicaid in providing health coverage for this population. The brief also highlights existing policy levers that may help address some of the health and well-being issues that children in foster care face.

Contact: First Focus, 1400 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 650, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Access to health care, Behavior problems, Child health, Child welfare, Emotional instability, Foster care, Foster children, Health care systems, Juvenile justice, Medicaid, Mental health, Public policy

Towvim L, Carney N, Thomas B, Repetti J, Roman L, Blaber C, Anderson K. 2013. School mental health: Snapshots from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative. Waltham, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights key characteristics of effective school mental health (SMH) and the strategies that federal Safe Schools/Health Students (SS/HS) initiative grantees have used to build and sustain comprehensive mental health programs. The report discusses what effective, comprehensive SMH does, describes key features of effective SMH, discusses SS/HS, and provides a close look at 13 SS/HS sites, focusing on key successes and lessons learned.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal programs, Academic achievement, Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child mental health, Emotional instability, Health promotion, Initiatives, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services, Safety, School age children, School health

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2012. Data-based planning for effective prevention: State epidemiological outcomes workgroups. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the evolution, structure, and accomplishments of state epidemiological outcomes workgroups (SEOWs) as a key component of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's support of states as they address problems related to substance abuse and mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. The report highlights SEOW successes and offers guidance for providing data to support prevention decision-making in the future at the state and community levels. Throughout the report, quotes from SEOW members illustrate the value of SEOWs to prevention programming in states and communities throughout the United States.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SAMHSA Pub. No. (SMA) 12-4724.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Community programs, Emotional instability, Mental disorders, Mental health, Prevention, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse

Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center. 2010. Children’s emotional, behavioral, and developmental well-being: New data and tools for the field. [Washington, DC]: Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center, (Dataspeak)

Annotation: In this Webcast focusing on children's emotional, behavioral, and developmental well-being, Dr Rheem Ghandour, a public health analyst from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, discusses the prevalence of emotional, behavioral, and developmental conditions at the national and state levels. Dr. James Perrin, professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, and director of the Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy at Mass General Hospital for Children, discusses evidence of the increasing rates of emotional, behavioral, and developmental conditions among children, with a focus on autism. Finally, Dr. Jane Foy, professor of pediatrics for Wake Forest University School of Medicine and chairperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on Mental Health, discusses the role that the public health community plays in addressing pediatric mental illness and provides resources that the task force developed. Presenter information, an agenda, resources, and a program archive are available.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Information Resource Center, Altarum Institute, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 842-2000 Fax: (202) 728-9469 E-mail: mchirc@altarum.org Web Site: http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov/researchdata/mchirc Available from the website.

Keywords: Autism, Behavior problems, Child development, Child health, Emotional instability, Mental disorders, Mental health, Multimedia, Public health

[Thomas A]. 2010. School as entry points for children's mental health services. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief provides information about child and adolescent mental health and the provision of mental health services in the school setting. The report also discusses the magnitude of emotional and behavioral problems among children and adolescents, benefits and challenges of providing school-based mental health services, and opportunities for funders. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent health, Behavior disorders, Child health, Emotional instability, Financing, Low income groups, School age children, School based clinics

Woods TA, Smith S, Cooper JL. 2010. Promoting the social-emotional wellbeing of toddlers in early intervention programs: Promising strategies in four communities. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 19 pp.

Annotation: This brief, which is a companion to a report on a 50-state survey of the Part C Program coordinators, presents approaches to support the social-emotional well-being of infants and young children through the Part C Program. The part C program, which is part of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, provides early intervention services for infants and young children with disabilities and their families. The strategies discussed in the brief were identified through case studies in four communities throughout the United States. The brief examines exemplary policies and practices that highlight the potential of the Part C Program to play a major role in reducing the risk of long-term social-emotional difficulties of vulnerable children. The brief includes a review of the Part C Program and the case study methodology, discusses promising strategies, and provides a summary of key findings and recommendations.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Children with special health care needs, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Emotional instability, Families, Federal programs, Infant development, Infants, Infants with special health care needs, Mental health, Vulnerability, Young children

Banghart P, Cooper JL. 2010. Unclaimed children revisited: Focusing on outcomes--A case study of the Michigan Level of Functioning Project. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report, which updates an earlier report on children in need of mental health services, identifies policy-supported state efforts to promote the quality of care for children and adolescents with mental problems and disorders who are in the public mental health system in Michigan. The report provides a case study of a Michigan initiative that strives to monitor and improve outcomes for children and adolescents with severe emotional disturbance. In addition, the report discusses Michigan's service delivery system, mental health services and efforts to promote evidence-based practices, cross-system collaboration, and infrastructure and fiscal policy.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Case studies, Child health, Collaboration, Emotional instability, Financing, Mental disorders, Mental health, Michigan, Public health programs, Public policy, Service delivery systems, State programs

Allen K, Pires SA. 2009. Improving Medicaid managed care for youth with serious behavioral health needs: A quality improvement toolkit. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 39 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit summarizes the experiences of plans that participated in the Collaborative on Improving Managed Care Quality for Youth with Serious Behavioral Health Needs, an initiative that worked with nine health plans to test a number of approaches to better serve children and adolescents with serious emotional disorders. The toolkit presents promising practices implemented by the plans and the resulting impact on access, care, and avoidance of unnecessary services and costs; challenges identified and addressed by the plans and lessons learned; and opportunities for continued innovation.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Community programs, Costs, Emotional instability, Health services, Initiatives, Medicaid managed care, Mental disorders, Model programs

Porter GK, Turner WC. 2006. Taking charge: An introductory guide to choosing the most effective services for the mental, behavioral, and emotional health of youth within a system of care. Washington, DC: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, 14 pp.

Annotation: This guide helps youth and families move through the process of seeking help and becoming better partners with their mental health providers in deciding the best course of treatment. Examples are provided of the emotional and behavioral disorders that are most commonly diagnosed in adolescents and providers an overview of the various intervention options available. The guide concludes with an example scenario presenting a conversation that could take place between a family worried about their child abusing substances and a healthcare provider.

Contact: Technical Assistance Partnership for Child and Family Mental Health, American Institutes for Research, 1000 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 403-6827 Fax: (202) 403-5007 E-mail: tapartnership@air.org Web Site: http://www.tapartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Advocacy, Behavior disorders, Emotional instability, Family support services, Health care systems, Interventions, Service delivery systems

Vermont Department of Developmental and Mental Health Services. 2005. Finding help for young children with social-emotional-behavioral challenges and their families: The Vermont Children's UPStream Services (CUPS) handbook. Waterbury, VT: Vermont Department of Developmental and Mental Health Services, 249 pp.

Annotation: This guide, which is geared for anyone concerned with the emotional and social welfare of infants and young children, focuses on specific difficulties that might affect an infant's or young child's natural developmental progression and on providing guidance on how to get support when needed. The guide is divided into 15 chapters, organized under four broad themes: the context for family life, specialized assessment and early intervention, understanding and responding to difficult family circumstances, and understanding and responding to young children in traumatic circumstances. Each chapter includes an introduction to the topic, general information and specific points to consider, and the listing of several recommended resources for more information. The guide includes three appendices: Vermont general resources, national organizations and Web sites, and About the Vermont Children's UPstream Services team.

Contact: Vermont Department of Mental Health, 108 Cherry Street-PO Box 70, Burlington, VT 05402, Telephone: (802) 652-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 464-4343 Fax: 802- 652-2005 Web Site: http://mentalhealth.vermont.gov Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Behavior problems, Child health, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Emotional development, Emotional instability, Families, Family support, High risk children, High risk infants, Infant health, Mental health services, Social adjustment, Social services, State programs, Vermont, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2005. Transforming mental health care in America: The federal action agenda—First steps. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 1 v.

Annotation: This report articulates objectives for the initiation of a long-term strategy designed to move the nation's public and private mental health service delivery toward the day when all adults with serious mental illnesses and all children with serious emotional disturbances will live, work, learn, and participate fully in their communities. The report, which includes an executive summary, provides background on the New Freedom Initiative (which is designed to promote full access to community life for people with disabilities) and discusses the need for a transformed mental health system, focusing on recovery, the process of transformation, transforming the system, and highlights of the action agenda. The report includes two appendices: (1) an executive order and (2) an acronyms list.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Disabilities, Emotional instability, Federal initiatives, Health care delivery, Health care systems, Inclusion, Mental disorders, Mental health, Mental health services

Stroul BA, Pires SA, Armstrong MI. 2004. Health Care Reform Tracking Project: Tracking state managed care reforms as they affect children and adolescents with behavioral health disorders and their families—2003 state survey. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 180 pp.

Annotation: This report represents one component of the Health Care Reform Tracking Project -- a 5-year project designed to track and analyze the impact of public sector managed care reforms on children and adolescents with emotional and substance abuse problems and their families. The report focuses on surveys of all the states. The report, which includes an executive summary, also contains information about state managed care initiatives, populations covered by managed care reform, managed care entities, service coverage and capacity, special provisions for youth with serious and complex behavioral health needs, financing and risk, clinical decision-making and management mechanisms, access, service coordination, early identification and intervention, cultural competence, family involvement, providers, accountability, the State Children's Health Insurance Program, and Concluding Observations. Two appendices provide the survey instrument and a list of technical assistance materials. Data are presented in tables throughout the report. The report also includes a child welfare special analysis.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Accountability, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Affective disorders, Child behavior, Child welfare, Children, Culturally competent services, Early intervention, Emotional instability, Ethics, Families, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Managed care, State health insurance programs, State initiatives, Substance abuse, Surveys

Vandivere S, Gallagher M, Moore KA. 2004. Changes in children's well-being and family environments. Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 4 pp. (Snapshots of America's families III; no. 18)

Annotation: This snapshot uses data from the 1997, 1999, and 2002 rounds of the National Survey of America's Families to determine whether the well-being and behavior of children and their family environments changed from the late 1990s to 2002. The snapshot pays particular attention to children in low-income families. It discusses (1) reading and storytelling, (2) engagement in school, (3) activities outside the home, (4) behavior and emotional problems, (5) parental aggression, and (6) child well-being by family income. The snapshot also includes a discussion. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the snapshot. The snapshot concludes with references and endnotes.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Aggression, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Children, Emotional instability, Families, Family income, Low income groups, Parents, Schools, Surveys

Goode T, Jackson V. 2003. Getting started ... and moving on ... planning, implementing, and evaluating culturally and linguistic competency for comprehensive community mental health services for children and families: Implications for systems of care. Washington, DC: National Center for Cultural Competence, 4 pp.

Annotation: This checklist -- which is one in a series designed to assist organizations and systems of care to develop policies, structures, and practices that support cultural and linguistic competence -- focuses on systems of care and organizations concerned with the delivery of services and supports to children and youth with emotional, behavioral, and mental disorders and their families. The checklist offers a list of actions that these organizations or systems of care can put into practice. Each item includes a description. The checklist also includes a list of definitions and a reference list.

Contact: National Center for Cultural Competence, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, P.O. Box 571485, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-5387 Secondary Telephone: (800) 788-2066 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: cultural@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://nccc.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Behavior disorders, Children, Communities, Culturally competent services, Emotional instability, Evaluation, Families, Health care systems, Language barriers, Linguistic competence, Mental disorders

Sanders MR, Lee MA. 2003. Promoting healthy children and families in Connecticut: Part 1—Health problems of infancy and early childhood. Farmington, CT: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 12 pp. (IMPACT: Ideas and information to promote the health of Connecticut's children; issue no. 3)

Annotation: This report provides a brief overview of relatively common significant health problems in infancy and early childhood, including preterm birth and low birthweight, death, poor nutrition, social and emotional health problems, injuries, and hazards in the environment. Topics also include ensuring good health in pregnancy, a nutritious diet in infancy and early childhood, and access to comprehensive primary and preventive health care. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the report. The report concludes with a list of references.

Contact: Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, 270 Farmington Avenue, Suite 367, Farmington, CT 06032, Telephone: (860) 679-1519 Fax: (860) 679-1521 E-mail: info@chdi.org Web Site: http://www.chdi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Child mortality, Child nutrition, Connecticut, Early childhood development, Emotional instability, Environmental exposure, Infant health, Infant mortality, Infant nutrition, Injuries, Low birthweight, Preterm birth, Social problems, State initiatives

Vermont Department of Developmental and Mental Health Services. 2001. Vermont system of care plan for children and adolescents with a severe emotional disturbance and their families. [Waterbury, VT]: Vermont Department of Developmental and Mental Health Services, 44 pp.

Annotation: This report describes Vermont's System of Care Plan, which was designed to address the complex needs of children and adolescents experiencing severe emotional disturbances, and their families. The report describes the background of the plan; explains the plan's child-centered, family-focused approach; discusses the system's mission, principles, and goals; discusses treatment planning; touches on working with the system; and provides an overview of current challenges. The report includes brief cases studies and is illustrated with black-and-white drawings.

Contact: Vermont Department of Mental Health, 108 Cherry Street-PO Box 70, Burlington, VT 05402, Telephone: (802) 652-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 464-4343 Fax: 802- 652-2005 Web Site: http://mentalhealth.vermont.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Children, Emotional instability, Families, Health care systems, Mental health, State programs, Treatment, Vermont

Pires SA, Stroul BA, Armstrong MI. 2000. Health care reform tracking project: Tracking state health care reforms as they affect children and adolescents with emotional disorders and their families--1999 impact analysis. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 254 pp.

Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law. 1999. Making sense of Medicaid for children with serious emotional disturbance. Washington, DC: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 90 pp.

Annotation: This report describes how states provide access to the most effective community-based services for children on Medicaid who need mental health care. Part I of the reportdiscusses the purpose of the report, child mental health services under Medicaid, and problems in Medicaid implementation. Part II deals with financing mechanisms and service definitions and Medicaid rules and program innovations in selected states.

Contact: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 1212, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 467-5730 Secondary Telephone: (202) 467-4232 Fax: (202) 223-0409 E-mail: communications@bazelon.org Web Site: http://www.bazelon.org Available in libraries. Document Number: CM-1.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child mental health, Children, Community based services, Emotional instability, Health care financing, Medicaid, Mental health services, Program improvement, Reports, State programs

Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law. 1999. Where to turn: Confusion in Medicaid policies on screening children for mental health needs. Washington, DC: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes a study reviewing policies in 29 states for screening children eligible for Medicaid to determine whether they need mental health services. The report includes sections about (1) EPSDT screening requirements, (2) managed care and screening responsibilities, (3) study findings, (4) the effect of screening policies, (5) policy implications and recommendations, (6) family information, and (7) the EPSDT treatment mandate. A table showing managed care responsibilities for screening state-by-state is included at the end.

Contact: Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, 1101 15th Street, N.W., Suite 1212, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 467-5730 Secondary Telephone: (202) 467-4232 Fax: (202) 223-0409 E-mail: communications@bazelon.org Web Site: http://www.bazelon.org $12.90 plus shipping and handling. Document Number: CM-2.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child mental health, Children, EPSDT, Emotional instability, Health policy, Managed care, Medicaid, Mental health services, Policy analysis, Responsibility, Screening, State programs

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.