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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (29 total).

Gay Rosenthal Productions, and Gabco Productions. n.d.. Rough love. Denver, CO: National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 1 videotape (50 minutes, VHS 1/2 inch).

Annotation: This videotape considers the dynamics and consequences of adolescent dating violence. It is hosted by Gabrielle Carteris in a studio setting with adolescents, families, and professionals. The videotape includes interviews and real life stories. It focuses on verbal, emotional, physical, and sexual abuse; and it discusses topics such as jealousy and disrespect, generational patterns in violent behavior, and danger signs of abuse. It also describes the elements of a healthy relationship, indicates strategies for breaking the cycle of violence, and suggests ways that adults can help.

Contact: National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 1120 Lincoln Street, Suite 1603 , Denver, CO 80203, Telephone: (303) 839-1852 Fax: (303) 831-9251 E-mail: mainoffice@ncadv.org Web Site: http://www.ncadv.org $25.00 plus 10 percent shipping; prepayment required.

Keywords: Adolescents, Audiovisual materials, Emotional abuse, Interpersonal relations, Materials for adolescents, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse, Videotapes, Violence

Jessee SA, Deinard AS. 2016. Child abuse and neglect: Implications for the dental professional (rev. ed.). Dallas, TX: Procter and Gamble Company, 1 v.

Annotation: This continuing-education course for oral health professionals provides information about child abuse and neglect and outlines responsibilities for recognizing, reporting, treating, and preventing child abuse and neglect. Topics include the incidence, etiology, and long-term effects of child maltreatment; the dentist’s role in intervention; identifying neglect and physical, sexual, and emotional abuse; assessment (history taking and diagnosis); and treating orofacial and dental trauma. A tool that educators can use for creating a student assignment is also available.

Contact: Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH Telephone: (800) 543-2577 Web Site: http://www.dentalcare.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Continuing education, Dental care, Dentistry, Emotional abuse, Intervention, Learning, Maltreated children, Oral health, Physical abuse, Prevention services, Resources for professionals, Responsibility, Teaching, Trauma

Tower CC. 2014. Understanding child abuse and neglect. (9th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon, 442 pp.

Annotation: This textbook covers a range of topics associated with child abuse and neglect. It provides an overview on the problem, considers the rights and responsibilities of parents and children, and reviews the effects of abuse and neglect on the development of children. Individual chapters cover physical, emotional, and sexual abuse, and neglect. Other chapters examine ways to prevent or intervene in abusive situations through the judicial system and consider treatment methodologies including the use of foster care. The book also includes a chapter on adults who were abused as children but who had not reported the fact.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Children's rights, Emotional abuse, Families, Family characteristics, Foster care, Incest, Intervention, Legal issues, Parent rights, Parenting, Physical abuse, Prevention, Sexual abuse, Social work

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Intimate partner violence: Resources for victims and families (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find hotlines and web sites about domestic violence, including rape, abuse, incest, teen dating, legal counsel, and services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Battered women, Bibliographies, Child abuse, Domestic violence, Electronic publications, Emotional abuse, Family relations, Family violence, Hotlines, Parent child relations, Physical abuse, Sexual abuse

Futures Without Violence. 2013. Health cares about IPV: Intimate partner violence screening and counseling toolkit. San Francisco, CA: Futures Without Violence,

Annotation: This toolkit offers resources to help health care professionals and others identify and support clients facing intimate partner violence. Contents include strategies for preparing a health care practice to start screening; screening and intervention approaches and tools; resources tailored to pediatric, adolescent, or reproductive health care settings; strategies and resources for domestic and sexual violence advocates; and promising practices from the field.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Domestic violence, Emotional abuse, Family violence, Intervention, Physical abuse, Resources for professionals, Screening, Sexual abuse

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2012. Data-based planning for effective prevention: State epidemiological outcomes workgroups. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 29 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the evolution, structure, and accomplishments of state epidemiological outcomes workgroups (SEOWs) as a key component of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's support of states as they address problems related to substance abuse and mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders. The report highlights SEOW successes and offers guidance for providing data to support prevention decision-making in the future at the state and community levels. Throughout the report, quotes from SEOW members illustrate the value of SEOWs to prevention programming in states and communities throughout the United States.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: SAMHSA Pub. No. (SMA) 12-4724.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Community programs, Emotional instability, Mental disorders, Mental health, Prevention, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health. 2012. Health care providers and screening and counseling for interpersonal and domestic violence. (upd. ed.). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 2 pp. (Fact sheet Q+A)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information for health professionals about screening and counseling for interpersonal and domestic violence under the Affordable Care Act. The fact sheet answers questions about new preventive services guidelines, why screening for interpersonal and domestic violence matters, how health professionals can get started with screening, what health professionals should do if a person discloses abuse, and how health professionals can learn more about responding to domestic violence.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office on Women's Health, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Room 712E, Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (800) 690-7650 Fax: (202) 205-2631 Web Site: http://www.womenshealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Domestic violence, Emotional abuse, Guidelines, Health services, Interpersonal violence, Legislation, Physical abuse, Prevention, Screening, Sexual abuse

Zahnd E, Aydin M, Grant D, Holtby S. 2011. The link between intimate partner violence, substance abuse, and mental health in California. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 8 pp. (Health policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief presents findings on the linkages between intimate partner violence (IPV), emotional health, and substance use among adults ages 18-65 in California. Topics include psychological distress among IPV victims, violence-related substance abuse, and mental health and substance abuse services needs among IPV victims.

Contact: UCLA Center for Health Policy Research, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024, Telephone: (310) 794-0909 Fax: (310) 794-2686 E-mail: chpr@ucla.edu Web Site: http://www.healthpolicy.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Domestic violence, Emotional trauma, Interpersonal violence, Mental health, Mental health services, Public policy, State surveys, Substance abuse, Substance abuse treatment services, Women's health

National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. 2010. Persistent fear and anxiety can affect young children's early learning and development. Cambridge, MA: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 13 pp. (Working paper no. 9)

Annotation: This working paper focuses on how early exposure to circumstances that produce persistent fear and chronic anxiety can have lifelong consequences by disrupting the architecture of the brain and on how to implement interventions to prevent and treat the harmful effects of exposure to extreme, fear-eliciting circumstances. The paper discusses what science tells us, correcting popular misrepresentations of science, the science-policy gap, and policy implications.

Contact: National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, Harvard University, 50 Church Street, Fourth Floor, Cambridge, MA 02138, Telephone: (617) 496-0578 E-mail: info@developingchild.net Web Site: http://www.developingchild.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Anxiety, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child maltreatment, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Intervention, Mental disorders, Mental health, Prevention, Public policy, Research, Treatment, Young children

Iskason E, Higgins LB, Davidson LL, Cooper JL. 2009. Indicators for social-emotional development in early childhood: A guide for local stakeholders. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report is intended to give local stakeholders the information and tools necessary to develop and use indicators for social-emotional development. The report includes (1) definitions of key concepts related to establishing indicators; (2) seven recommended indicators for social-emotional development; (3) a framework to determine local priorities and get started with indicator adoption, (4) resources for finding data at the community level for each indicator, and (5) how to interpret and use data collected for each of the suggested indicators. Examples of successful use of these indicators in states and local communities are provided.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior problems, Child abuse, Child development, Child health, Communities, Community programs, Depression, Emotional development, Mental disorders, Social indicators, Statistical data, Young children

Hodas GR. 2006. Responding to childhood trauma: The promise and practice of trauma informed care. [Alexandria, VA: National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors], 77 pp.

Annotation: This paper builds on efforts by the National Technical Assistance Center for Mental Health Planning, the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors, and others to increase appreciation of the relevance of trauma in understanding children and planning to meet their needs. The paper focuses primarily on child maltreatment and on children in institutional settings such as juvenile detention facilities. It is organized into two main parts. Part 1 discusses the challenges of childhood trauma, and part 2 addresses meeting the challenge of trauma-informed care. A discussion, a conclusion, and suggested readings are also included.

Contact: National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors, 66 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 302, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 739-9333 Fax: (703) 548-9517 Web Site: http://www.nasmhpd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child health, Emotional trauma, Health care, Maltreated children, Mental health, Residential care, Therapeutics

Anda R. 2006. The health and social impact of growing up with alcohol abuse and related adverse childhood experiences: The human and economic costs of the status quo. Rockville, MD: National Association for Children of Alcoholics, 20 pp.

Annotation: This paper focuses on key findings from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, a decade-long, ongoing study designed to examine the childhood origins of many health and social problems. The paper describes the study design and discusses the interrelatedness of ACEs. Types of ACEs discussed include abuse, neglect, household dysfunction, and battered mother. The relationship of ACE scores to alcohol consumption, risk factors for HIV and AIDS, smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; depression and suicide attempts; worker performance; and health care costs. Implications are discussed. References are included. Statistical information is presented in figures throughout the paper.The paper includes one appendix: a detailed list of health and social problems shown to have a graded relationship with ACE scores.

Contact: National Association for Children of Alcoholics, 11426 Rockville Pike, Suite 301, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (301) 468-0985 Secondary Telephone: (888) 554-COAS Fax: (301) 468-0987 E-mail: nacoa@nacoa.org Web Site: http://www.nacoa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: AIDS, Alcohol abuse, Alcohol consumption behavior, Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Children, Costs, Domestic violence, Drug abuse, Emotional abuse, HIV, Health, High risk children, High risk families, Lung diseases, Physical abuse, Smoking: Depression, Substance abuse, Suicide

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Administration on Children, Youth and Families, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. 2004-. Child maltreatment, __: Reports from the states to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect, annual.

Annotation: This annual report synthesizes information provided by state child protective service agencies to the federally mandated National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System (NCANDS). It reviews the background of the data collection process; analyzes the national child abuse and neglect data for the year being covered; considers the detailed case data component of NCANDS with examples of some of the types of analyses that can be made of the data; and discusses future directions. Data gathered include: age, sex, race or ethnic group of victims, types of abuse, case dispositions and descriptive information on perpetrators. Appendices contain listings for state advisory group representatives, summary data component tables, and state responses to the summary data component and state comments. This report was previously published under the title: "National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System Working Paper 1: 1990 Summary Data Component, " and "National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System Working Paper 2: 1991 Summary Data Component."

Contact: Child Welfare Information Gateway, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families, Children's Bureau, 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (800) 394-3366 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: info@childwelfare.gov Web Site: http://www.childwelfare.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child abuse, Child neglect, Children, Crime, Data collection, Demographics, Emotional abuse, Federal programs, National data, Sexual assault, State data reports, State surveys, Statistics

Stroul BA, Pires SA, Armstrong MI. 2004. Health Care Reform Tracking Project: Tracking state managed care reforms as they affect children and adolescents with behavioral health disorders and their families—2003 state survey. Tampa, FL: University of South Florida, Research and Training Center for Children's Mental Health, 180 pp.

Annotation: This report represents one component of the Health Care Reform Tracking Project -- a 5-year project designed to track and analyze the impact of public sector managed care reforms on children and adolescents with emotional and substance abuse problems and their families. The report focuses on surveys of all the states. The report, which includes an executive summary, also contains information about state managed care initiatives, populations covered by managed care reform, managed care entities, service coverage and capacity, special provisions for youth with serious and complex behavioral health needs, financing and risk, clinical decision-making and management mechanisms, access, service coordination, early identification and intervention, cultural competence, family involvement, providers, accountability, the State Children's Health Insurance Program, and Concluding Observations. Two appendices provide the survey instrument and a list of technical assistance materials. Data are presented in tables throughout the report. The report also includes a child welfare special analysis.

Contact: National Technical Assistance Center for Children's Mental Health, Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, 3300 Whitehaven Street, Suite 3300, Washington, DC 20007, Telephone: (202) 687-5000 Fax: (202) 687-8899 E-mail: childrensmh@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://gucchdtacenter.georgetown.edu/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Accountability, Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Affective disorders, Child behavior, Child welfare, Children, Culturally competent services, Early intervention, Emotional instability, Ethics, Families, Financing, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Managed care, State health insurance programs, State initiatives, Substance abuse, Surveys

Harris WW, Putnam FW, Fairbank JA. 2004. Mobilizing trauma resources for children [DRAFT]. [St. Louis, MO]: Johnson and Johnson Pediatric Institute, 43 pp.

Annotation: This draft manuscript was presented in part at the meeting "Shaping the Future of Children's Health" held in San Juan, Puerto Rico, February 12-16, 2004. It summarizes research into the consequences of child trauma and its contribution to public health problems worldwide. Topics include the prevalence of traumatized children, consequences of trauma, a definition of trauma, how trauma hurts children, protective factors and resiliency, trauma as a risk factor, assessment and evaluation strategies and issues, universal vs. targeted screening for children, ethical issues in the assessment of traumatized children, and therapeutic responses to positive screens. Findings are discussed with examples given of models and programs, as well as discussion and summary conclusions. References conclude the manuscript.

Contact: Every Child Matters Education Fund, 1023 15th Street, NW, Suite 401 , Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 223-8177 Fax: (202) 223-8499 E-mail: info@everychildmatters.org Web Site: http://www.everychildmatters.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child health, Child mental health, Children, Emotional trauma, Ethics, Grief, Health screening, Physical abuse, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Public health, Research, Risk assessment, Stress, Trauma

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Casey Family Programs. 2003. Early childhood measurement toolkit: Instrumentation and recommendations from the Starting Early Starting Smart program. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; Seattle, WA: Casey Family Programs, 23 pp.

Annotation: This tool kit is a summary of lessons learned about the utility and feasibility of measures of family and child outcomes that were used in the Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) multi-site study. SESS targets families with very young children who were at risk for delayed social-emotional, language, and physical development owing to to risk factors such as caregiver substance abuse, immigrant status, or poverty. The tool kit seeks to (1) introduce the SESS program and the process of designing the instrument package, (2) identify categories of criteria for assessing the usefulness and feasibility of instruments in field evaluation and program monitoring settings, (3) identify and summarize the measures that were applied in the SESS study, and (4) summarize the experience of program providers and researchers with each instrument. The summary provides assessment and recommendations with respect to pragmatic criteria of usefulness and feasibility as well as traditional scientific criteria. Measures covered child and adult behavioral health, language development, parenting, and home environment.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Community programs, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Federal programs, High risk children, Immigrants, Language, Measures, Poverty, Research, Screening, Social skills, Substance abuse, Tests, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Casey Family Programs. 2003. Starting Early Starting Smart final report: Summary of findings. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; Seattle, WA: Casey Family Programs, 25 pp.

Annotation: This summary report documents the Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) approach to service integration as developed across participating grantees, reports on findings from a multi-site evaluation, and documents lessons produced over the 4 years of the initial SESS collaboration. SESS targets families with very young children who are at risk for delayed social-emotional, language, and physical development owing to to risk factors such as caregiver substance abuse, immigrant status, or poverty. Topics covered in the report include SESS interventions and participants, behavioral health services and outcomes for caregivers, parenting and home environment services and outcomes, and behavioral health services and outcomes for children. A conclusion and references are included. SESS sites and contact information are provided.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Collaboration, Community programs, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Federal programs, Health services, High risk children, Immigrants, Intervention, Participation, Poverty, Research, Service integration, Social skills, Substance abuse, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Casey Family Programs. 2001. The Starting Early Starting Smart Family Strengths Institute: A journal of the convening. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; Seattle, WA: Casey Family Programs, 36 pp.

Annotation: This journal documents the family involvement process of The Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) Family Strengths Institute. The SESS program is a research-based collaborate effort between the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Casey Family Programs that targets families with very young children who are at risk for delayed social-emotional, language, and physical development owing to to risk factors such as caregiver substance abuse, immigrant status, or poverty. The purpose of the institute was to learn from SESS families how to keep families at the center of care while empowering them in a meaningful participatory way in program implementation. The journal describes the planning process for the institute, summarizes the events of the institute and lessons learned, and includes stories about families who participated in the institute. Appendices list participants, presenters, and SESS grant sites.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Community programs, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Federal programs, Immigrants, Language, Mental health, Parent participation, Personal narratives, Poverty, Research, Social skills, Substance abuse, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Casey Family Programs. 2001. Key guide points for partnering with families. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; Seattle, WA: Casey Family Programs, 8 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which is geared toward family-serving individuals and organizations seeking ways to enter into partnerships with families, provides guide points for partnering with families. The guide points are taken from The Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) Family Strengths Institute: A Journal of the Convening. Starting Early Starting Smart targets families with very young children who are at risk for delayed social-emotional, language, and physical development owing to to risk factors such as caregiver substance abuse, immigrant status, or poverty. The guide points are divided into three categories: advance planning, early encounters, and working together for the long term.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Collaboration, Community programs, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Federal programs, High risk children, Immigrants, Language, Parent participation, Poverty, Social skills, Substance abuse, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and Casey Family Programs. 2001. The Starting Early Starting Smart story. Rockville, MD: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration; Seattle, WA: Casey Family Programs, 59 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Starting Early Starting Smart (SESS) program. SESS targets families with very young children who are at risk for delayed social-emotional, language, and physical development owing to to risk factors such as caregiver substance abuse, immigrant status, or poverty. The report introduces the program, describes program innovations and early lessons learned, discusses next steps, and describes program sites. Two appendices include the SESS national collaborators' mission statement and a list of SESS grant sites.

Contact: National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information, Telephone: (800) 729-6686 Secondary Telephone: (800) 487-4889 Web Site: http://ncadi.samhsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Community programs, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Families, Federal programs, High risk children, Immigrants, Poverty, Research, Social skills, Substance abuse, Young children

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.