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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (143 total).

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among young children. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote the social and emotional health of young children. It includes separate tips for parents, pediatricians, and early education and child care providers. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction, Young children

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d. . Tips to promote social-emotional health among teens. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 4 pp.

Annotation: This tip sheet provides advice to help promote social and emotional health among adolescents. It includes separate tips for teenagers, parents, schools, and pediatricians. Links to additional resources produced by the American Academy of Pediatrics are also provided.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Social interaction

Partridge S. n.d.. PROJECT AIMS [Final report]. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, 37 pp.

Annotation: Project AIMS worked to strengthen the capacity of Maine's service system (including P.L. 99-457 efforts) to meet the emotional health needs of young children (birth to 5 years old) and their families. The project objectives were to: (1) Establish a multidisciplinary network of project associates; (2) develop and field-test an emotional health brief assessment tool for children birth to 5 years old; (3) recommend to the service network methods of conducting comprehensive psychosocial assessments of children/families with emotional difficulties; and (4) strengthen treatment services which facilitate attachment, interaction, mastery, and support within families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158608.

Keywords: 99-457, Community-Based Health Services, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Emotional Health, High risk children, High risk groups: Families, L, P, Parent-Child Interaction, Screening Tools

Fiser D. n.d.. Outcome Evaluation of Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 27 pp.

Annotation: The primary purpose and goal of this project was the validation of scales for measuring cognitive and physical or general adaptive morbidity, the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall provides the means of evaluation needed to reach the EMSC goal to evaluate emergency medical care of children as outlined in the EMSC 5 year plan. A secondary purpose of the study was to obtain supplemental data on the nature and severity of adverse outcomes of psychosocial adjustment for children and families with a broad range of cognitive and functional outcomes following childhood emergencies. This study and other work by the investigator will facilitate the identification of the population of children and families at high risk for emergencies in order to guide the development of a suitable intervention in a future phase of study. A cohort of 200 PICU discharges were accumulated consecutively over a 22 month enrollment period to a maximum of 25 patients in each of the eight cells of the study. The patients were then followed up with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and a battery of psychological tests. We find that the POPC and PCPC scales differentiate well between children of varying cognitive and general adaptive functional abilities as measured by the StanfordBinet, Bayley, and Vineland instruments. They should provide a useful tool for future studies which require outcome assessment. Maternal assessments may not be suitable substitutes for clinician assessments as mothers tend to rate children lower (less morbidity) than the nurse rater. Additional outcome analyses are still in progress. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-128317.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emotional Health, Mental Health, Morbidity, Research

American Academy of Pediatrics. n.d.. Mom! Dad! Ask the doctor about my emotional development, too!. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 12 items.

Annotation: These advertising materials promote the importance of mental health as part of a health supervision visit. They are designed to be displayed on a bulletin board or used as a table top display in a pediatric practice. One version focuses on young children and the other on teenagers. Both versions are available in English and Spanish. Other versions are provided for use on Facebook pages or in parent newsletters.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child mental health, Emotional development, Health supervision, Pediatric care, Public awareness materials, Social interaction

Johnson K, Willis D, Doyle S. 2020. Guide to leveraging opportunities between Title V and Medicaid for promoting social-emotional development. Washington, DC: Center for the Study of Social Policy and Johnson Group Consulting, 100 pp. (matrix 21 pp.).

Annotation: This guide is designed to support state-level planning, action, and innovation aligned with the goals of the Pediatrics Supporting Parents initiative, using a framework that stretches from promotion to screening to prevention to early intervention and treatment. It covers the essential power of Title V and Medicaid partnership, promoting social-emotional development in pediatric primary care, state opportunities for using Title V and Medicaid/EPSDT to promote social-emotional development and mental health, learning from current state actions, and family engagement. It is accompanied by a matrix that provides charts of specific actions that Title V and Medicaid programs can take to achieve these goals.

Contact: Center for the Study of Social Policy, 1575 Eye Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 371-1565 Fax: (202) 371-1472 E-mail: info@cssp.org Web Site: http://www.cssp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, EPSDT, Emotional development, Medicaid, Primary care, Social factors, Title V programs

Johnson J, Wright FD. 2019. Child maltreatment: The role of the dental professional. Dallas, TX: Procter and Gamble Company, 1 v.

Annotation: This continuing-education course for oral health professionals provides information about child abuse and neglect and outlines responsibilities for recognizing, reporting, treating, and preventing child abuse and neglect. Topics include defining the problem, the dentist's role in intervention, presenting problems that suggest child maltreatment, assessment and documentation, reporting, treatment for orofacial or dental trauma, and what oral health professionals can do to reduce child maltreatment.

Contact: Procter and Gamble Company, Cincinnati, OH Telephone: (800) 543-2577 Web Site: http://www.dentalcare.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child abuse, Child neglect, Child sexual abuse, Continuing education, Dental care, Emotional abuse, Intervention, Maltreated children, Oral health, Physical abuse, Prevention services, Resources for professionals, Responsibility, Trauma

Hagan JF Jr. 2019. Making Bright Futures work: How evidence, the periodicity schedule, and the Bright Futures guidelines impact practice. Itasca, IL: American Academy of Pediatrrics, 1 video (58 min.).

Annotation: This video reviews new clinical content in the Bright Futures Guidelines and the associated Periodicity Schedule, and discusses how to use evidence to decide on content for your practice's health supervision visits and how to identify strategies, tools, and resources to maximize efficiency for health promotion and preventive services.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Evidence based medicine, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Videos, Weight management

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2018. Bright Futures tool and resource kit (2nd ed.). Itasca, IL: Amercan Academy of Pediatrics,

Annotation: This companion to the most current edition of the Bright Futures Guidelines for Health Supervision of Infants, Children and Adolescents, the national standard for well-child care provides updated forms and materials relate to preventive health supervision and health screening for infants, children, and adolescents. These include pre-visit questionnaires, visit documentation forms, parent and patient handouts, supplemental education handouts, and medical screening reference tables.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Professional resources, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Hagan JF, Shaw JS, Duncan PM, eds. 2017. Bright Futures: Guidelines for health supervision of infants, children, and adolescents–Pocket guide (4th ed.). Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, 123 pp.

Annotation: This pocket guide summarizes recommendations for promoting the healthy development of infants, children, and adolescents from birth to age 21, as well as standards for health supervision visits. Topics include lifelong health for families and communities, family support, health for children and adolescents with special health care needs, development, mental health, weight, nutrition, physical activity, oral health, use of social media, and safety and injury prevention. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org $16.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-61002-082-4.

Keywords: Adolescent development, Adolescent health, Anticipatory guidance, Child development, Child health, Communities, Disease prevention, Emotional development, Families, Guidelines, Health promotion, Health screening, Health supervision, Infant development, Infant health, Injury prevention, Mental health, Nutrition, Oral health, Pediatric care, Perinatal health, Physical activity, Preventive health services, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Safety, Sexual health, Standards, Weight management

Wilson-Simmons R, Jiang Y, Aratani Y. 2017. Strong at the broken places: The resiliency of low-income parents. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report examines factors that promote or hinder children's healthy development, drawing on recent studies to illustrate the importance of parent resiliency in the development of social-emotional competence among children from families with low incomes. The report concludes with program and policy recommendations that have proven effective in promoting the development of protective factors, reducing vulnerabilities, and cultivating resiliency among parents with low incomes and, consequently, their children.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Competence, Coping, Emotional development, Low income groups, Mental health, Parenting skills, Parents, Policy development, Program development, Protective factors, Psychosocial development, Resilience, Vulnerability

U.S. Office of Head Start. 2016. Head Start approach to school readiness: Overview. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Head Start, 1 v.

Annotation: This resource defines school readiness and provides frameworks for understanding school readiness, and outlines goals and core strategies to promote school readiness in Head Start programs. Additional contents include frequently asked questions applicable to agencies serving preschoolers and/or infants and toddlers and those serving infants and toddlers only. Information about ways programs can establish goals for school readiness and take steps to achieve them are also available.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Community programs, Emotional development, Families, Head Start, Infant health, Infants, Language development, Learning, Parent participation, Psychosocial development, School readiness, Young children

Pinderhughes H, Davis RA, Williams M. 2016. Adverse community experiences and resilience: A framework for addressing and preventing community trauma. Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute, 34 pp., exec. summ (6 pp.)

Annotation: This paper explores trauma at the population level and how it impacts efforts to prevent violence and improve other aspects of community health. The paper also presents a framework for addressing and preventing trauma at the community level. Topics include the community environment, the production of trauma from violence, community strategies to address community violence, elements of a resilient community, and promoting community resilience.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Culturally competent services, Economic factors, Emotional trauma, Geographic factors, Health promotion, Models, Prevention programs, Resilience, Social conditions, Social support, Sociocultural factors, Standards, Trauma, Trauma care, Violence prevention

Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups and Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services. 2016. Sharing child information to coordinate early childhood special education (ECSE) referrals: Guidance for clinics and schools. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups; Roseville, MN: Minnesota Department of Education, Early Learning Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document provides guidance for clinics and schools on the roles and responsibilities of medical providers and educational professionals in identifying and treating developmental and social-emotional concerns in young children from birth to age 5. Topics include communicating with families; referring for educational and medical evaluation; sharing evaluation results, including information about confidentiality and consent; and shared care planning. A link to a map of trained mental health professionals and a graphic showing a communication feedback loop are included.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Child and Teen Checkups Program, P.O. Box 64882, St. Paul, MN 55164-0882, Telephone: (651) 201-3760 E-mail: health.childandteencheckups@state.mn.us Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/cfh/program/ctc Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Clinics, Communication, Confidentiality, Early childhood, Early intervention, Emotional development, Family support, Legal issues, Mental health, Parent consent, Planning, Psychosocial development, Referrals, Role, School districts, Schools, Screening, Young children

Keystone Center. 2015. State policies that support the intersection between health and early learning. Leawood, KH: Alliance for Early Success, 11 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents recommendations for improving state policies for children starting at birth and continuing through age eight. The contents are organized around the following three themes: recognizing a broader definition of health to better address the needs of children, supporting families and caregivers to increase children's success, and improving measures and outcomes to ensure children are on a path to success. Topics include prevention, increasing access to coverage, coordinating and streamlining screening and treatment, addressing mental and emotional needs of families and caregivers, using a continuous improvement model to improve outcomes for children, and leveraging data to promote health equity.

Contact: Alliance for Early Success, P.O. Box 6756, Leawood, KS 66206, Telephone: (913) 642-3490 Web Site: http://earlysuccess.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Family support, Health policy, Learning, Measures, Mental health, Outcome and process assessment, Policy development, Research, State initiatives, Young children

Roth MS, Allman A, Wilhite BC. 2014–. Health and wellness for adolescent girls and women with mental and behavioral health conditions: Professional resource guide. Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health,

Annotation: This knowledge path aims to bridge the public health and mental health information needs of professionals on approaches to promoting optimal health and wellness for women of childbearing age who experience a mental, emotional, or behavioral heath condition. The resource covers topics relevant to health promotion and disease prevention for all women, and specifically for women with mental and behavioral health disorders. Topics include reproductive and maternal health, intentional injury, chronic conditions, healthy behaviors, and health disparities. Contents include websites, distance learning tools, reports, data and statistics, journal articles and other literature and research, and guides on related topics. A separate brief presents resources for women and their families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent females, Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Consumer education materials, Disease prevention, Emotional disorders, Health promotion, Mental health, Resources for professionals, Women

American Academy of Pediatrics. 2014-. Early Brain and Child Development (EBCD) education and training modules. Elk Grove Village, IL: American Academy of Pediatrics, multiple items.

Annotation: These five modules and accompanying guides for primary care health professionals provide information and resources on early brain development, toxic stress, adverse childhood experiences, supporting parents and cultivating community relationships, and advocacy. Each module includes a PowerPoint presentation with presenter notes and a guide with tips for presenting the content. Each module also contains activities, video clips, prompting questions, and case studies to encourage active participation.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Brain, Cognitive development, Early childhood development, Emotional development, Mental health, Parent support services, Primary care, Psychological development, Relationships, Stress, Training, Vulnerability

Lorenzo SB. 2014. Emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens: Family resource brief (2nd ed., upd.). Washington, DC: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 1 p.

Annotation: This brief is designed to help families find mental health care, services, and support and websites about emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges in kids and teens. A separate section presents websites about babies and young kids. Another lists websites for teens. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Affective disorders, Behavior development, Behavior disorders, Bibliographies, Children, Electronic publications, Emotional development, Family support services, Mental health, Psychological needs, Social behavior

Kallal J, Walker J, Conlan Lewis L, Simons D, Lipper J, Pires S. 2014. Becoming a Medicaid provider of family and youth peer support: Considerations for family run organizations. Hamilton, NJ: Center for Health Care Strategies, 23 pp.

Annotation: This resource provides guidance to organizations on becoming a Medicaid provider of family and youth peer support. The resource focuses primarily on organizations operated by parents and caregivers of children, youth, and young adults affected by serious emotional, behavioral, and mental health challenges. Examples from three states (Arizona, Maryland, and Rhode Island) illustrate key aspects of the decision and process in becoming a Medicaid provider. Topics include the potential impact on the organization's mission, funding, service delivery environment, and advocacy role; how the structure and requirements of a state's Medicaid program may impact the delivery of services; working with state and local governments and provider systems; staffing considerations; and billing and rate-setting processes.

Contact: Center for Health Care Strategies, 200 American Metro Boulevard, Suite 119, Hamilton, NJ 08619, Telephone: (609) 528-8400 Fax: (609) 586-3679 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.chcs.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Decision making, Emotional disorders, Family support services, Health services delivery, Medicaid, Mental health, Public private partnerships, State programs, Young adults

Center for Health and Health Care in Schools. 2014. The impact of school-connected behavioral and emotional health interventions on student academic performance: An annotated bibliography of research literature. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 11 pp.

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.