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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 17 (17 total).

University of North Carolina, School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine; Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine; and District of Columbia, Department of Maternal, Child Health, Division of Injury Prevention and Emergency Medical Services for Children. n.d.. North Carolina emergency medical services for children: Pediatrics protocols for prehospital and emergency department management. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina, Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Charlotte, NC: Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine; Washington, DC: District of Columbia, Department of Maternal, Child Health, Division of Injury Prevention and Emergency Medical Services for Children, 35 pp.

Annotation: These protocols for emergency medical technicians and hospital personnel in North Carolina provide guidelines for triage, transport, and treatment of children who have suffered traumatic injuries or have life threatening conditions. The protocols are grouped in two sections; the first contains prehospital paramedic protocols; and the second contains hospital treatment protocols. The first section also includes guidelines for transport. The individual protocols are presented as flow-charts with the critical procedures indicated for each step in caring for the child. Conditions include: multiple trauma, head trauma, newborn resuscitation, poisoning, and seizures, among others. [Partially funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, 1000 Blythe Boulevard , Charlotte, NC 28203, Telephone: (704) 355-3658 Fax: (704) 355-7047 E-mail: EMresidency@CarolinasHealthCare.Org Price unknown.

Keywords: Emergency medical services for children, Emergency medical technicians, Hospital emergency services, Hospital personnel, Injuries, North Carolina, Protocols, Resources for professionals, Therapeutics

Davidson L. n.d.. Demonstration Projects for Pediatric EMS Systems Components: [Final report]. Mobile, AL: University of South Alabama College of Medicine, 104 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the this project was to demonstrate effective models for the necessary components of an emergency medical services for children (EMSC) system and the integration of those components into currently operating adult-oriented systems. The project has outlined the six major components of an EMSC system: (l) System description, (2) prevention, (3) education, (4) standards of care, (5) quality assurance, and (6) research and development. The project comprised seven subprojects whose activities included educating the public, the prehospital care provider, and the rural physician about the assessment and management of pediatric emergencies; comparing the efficacy of ground versus air transport; defining the degree of psychological impairment caused by head injury; identifying the rehabilitation facilities available locally, regionally, and nationally; and increasing compliance with safety belt/child restraint legislation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103332.

Keywords: Cost-Benefit Analysis, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency medical technicians, Facilities For, First Aid, Head Injuries, Health Professionals, Paramedics, Rehabilitation, Seat Belts/Restraints for Children

Fiser D. n.d.. Demonstration Project: Emergency Medical Services for Children: [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 44 pp.

Annotation: The Arkansas Demonstration Project utilized a broad-based approach to evaluate and improve the outcome of pediatric emergencies in Arkansas. It involved interaction with many statewide agencies, including various offices of the Arkansas Department of Health and the Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The project was designed with four primary purposes: (1) Increase the level of knowledge regarding the consequences of critical illness and injury in children in the State of Arkansas; (2) improve the emergency medical services provided to those children during the project period and after, particularly to handicapped and minority children; (3) determine the effectiveness of the proposed methodologies for the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with childhood illness and injury; and (4) determine effective methods of imparting the knowledge gained to other States in a manner resulting in the adoption of effective programs by those States. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196947.

Keywords: Ambulances, Child Education of Health Professionals, Data Bases, Data Collection, Disabled, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), Emergency medical technicians, Minorities, Morbidity, Mortality, Networking

Hubinger J. n.d.. Michigan Model for Improving Pediatric Emergency Medical Services (EMS for Children in Michigan [Final report]. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Public Health,

Annotation: This project sought to reduce the number and the impact of childhood injuries, especially those due to fire and violence. Two broad objectiveswere written for year 3 activities, involving methods of training emergency providers (training objective), and public/student education, smoke detector battery distribution, and school injury reporting (injury prevention objective). Materials developed include a 1993 injury prevention calendar, a statewide curriculum for pediatric emergencies, and data reports on prehospital and inpatient studies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121917.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Injury Prevention, Professional Education in EMSC, School Age Children

Olson L. n.d.. New Mexico Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico, 5 pp.

Annotation: The mortality, morbidity, and economic burden associated with childhood trauma and illness represent a serious public health problem in New Mexico. This is particularly true for rural and minority families. The long term goals of this project were to reduce the frequency and seriousness of negative outcomes for children and families who have suffered an emergency and to promote preventive activities directed at reducing injuries that generate pediatric emergencies. The project demonstrated progress in reaching these long term goals through: (1) increased childhood injury prevention programs statewide including promoting EMTs to be prevention advocates in their communities; (2) improved clinical care in the pediatric emergency medical system which includes prehospital and hospital care providers; (3) improved data collection and analysis for pediatric injury and illness; and (4) coalition building. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-155716.

Keywords: American Indians, Bilingual Services, Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Injury Prevention, Rural Population

Stuemky J. n.d.. Developing and Improving the Capacity of Existing Pediatric Emergency Medical Services in Oklahoma [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: University of Oklahoma,

Annotation: The State of Oklahoma has a limited and fragmented EMS system that has not adequately addressed the needs of its pediatric population. To decrease the negative outcomes of pediatric emergency care, this project: (1) Established a prehospital- and hospital-based data collection system to provide definition of emergency medical services for children (EMSC) and identify negative outcome factors; (2) developed and assisted a statewide consortium in support of EMSC issues; (3) provided pediatric prehospital and hospital care training to emergency medical technicians, nurses, and physicians; and (4) worked with Native Americas and Hispanic populations to prevent child abuse and related injuries. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child Abuse, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Programs, Professional Education in EMSC, Shaken Infant Syndrome

Eichelberger M. n.d.. Pediatric Emergency Medical Services Training Program [Final report]. Washington, DC: Children's Hospital National Medical Center, 171 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to supplement the three (out of 110) hours in pediatric and childbirth training mandated by the U.S. Department of Transportation's curriculum standards for basic EMT training. The project trained EMTs who were nominated by state EMS directors and who returned to train other EMTs in their states. Audiovisual aids were made available to graduates for their use in local training. By the end of 1988 the project trained 190 EMTs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103415.

Keywords: Continuing Education, Education of Health Professionals, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), Injuries

McClain M. 2007. Sudden unexpected infant and child death: A guide for emergency department personnel. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Center for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, 19 pp.

Annotation: This guide is intended for staff members of the hospital emergency department who interact with family members during an initial crisis related to a sudden infant or child death. Included are guidelines on how emergency health care personnel can be responsive to the family's emotional needs and can be aware of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sudden unexplained death in childhood (SUDC) as possible causes. Topics discussed include initial care of a lifeless, or near-lifeless infant or child; medical evaluation and diagnosis; how best to inform the parents; and parent support and follow-up. Apppendices include an emergency department checklist for sudden infant and child death, a case management profile of the Massachusetts Center for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, a flowchart illustrating case management within the Centers' bereavement program, and a copy of the Center's emergency room encounter form.

Contact: Massachusetts Center for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, Boston Medical Center Dept. of Pediatrics, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, 4th Floor, Room 4204, Boston, MA 02118-2393, Telephone: (617) 414-SIDS Secondary Telephone: (800) 641-7437 Web Site: http://www.bmc.org/pediatrics-MA-SIDS.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Bereavement, Emergency medical services, Emergency medical technicians, Family support services, Guidelines, Infant death, Massachusetts, Resources for professionals, SIDS, bereavement

Foltin G, Tunik M, Cooper A, Markenson D, Treiber M, Skomorowsky A. 2002. Paramedic TRIPP: Teaching resource for instructors in prehospital pediatrics (Version 1.0). New York, NY: Center for Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This paramedic version of TRIPP: Teaching Resource for Instructors in Prehospital Pediatrics is a resource that enables instructors of ambulance personnel to provide comprehensive training in the assessment and treatment of critically ill and injured children. It expands the scope of prehospital practice from basic to advanced life support procedures for children. It incorporates the most recent guidelines of the American Heart Association, covers the objectives of the U.S. Department of Transportation National Standard Curriculum for Paramedics, and is consistent with the recommendations outlined in Education of Out-of-Hospital Emergency Medical Personnel in Pediatrics: Report of a National Task Force. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Pediatric Emergency Medicine, New York University Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Center, 27th Street and First Avenue, Room 1E 9, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 562-4470 Fax: (212) 562-7753 E-mail: info@cpem.org Web Site: http://www.med.nyu.edu/pediatrics/emergency/cpem/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, CD-ROMs, Emergency medical services for children, Emergency medical technicians, Health personnel, Injuries, Resource materials, Training, Training materials

Foltin G, Tunik M, Cooper A, Markenson D, Treiber M, Phillips R, Karpeles T. 1998. TRIPP: Teaching resource for instructors in prehospital pediatrics (Version 2.0). New York, NY: Center for Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 1 CD-ROM.

Annotation: This CD-ROM was developed to bridge the knowledge gap that exists in the specialized field of prehospital pediatric care. It is a guide for instructors who teach the pediatrics sections of the revised EMT-Basic: National Standard Curriculum. It provides instructors with fundamental background knowledge about assessing and treating critically ill and injured children. It is an 1999 national award winner as an EMSC innovative product of the year. The CD-ROM is designed to work on both Mac and PC computers. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Pediatric Emergency Medicine, New York University Medical Center and Bellevue Hospital Center, 27th Street and First Avenue, Room 1E 9, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 562-4470 Fax: (212) 562-7753 E-mail: info@cpem.org Web Site: http://www.med.nyu.edu/pediatrics/emergency/cpem/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, CD-ROMs, Emergency medical services for children, Emergency medical technicians, Health personnel, Injuries, Training, Training materials

Su E. 1997. Pediatric Prehospital Critical Care Skills Retention: [Final report]. Portland, OR: Oregon Health Sciences University, 12 pp.

Annotation: Optimal care of critically ill or injured children in out-of-hospital settings depends on the knowledge and skills of the emergency medical technician-paramedic (EMT-P). Limited exposure to pediatric emergencies may result in the deterioration of necessary knowledge and skills. This study assessed knowledge of pediatric resuscitation and deterioration of skills over a 12-month period following a pediatric resuscitation course, and determined the effect of ongoing clinical experience and re-education on the extent of deterioration in skill levels. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-126741.

Keywords: Continuing Education, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, MCH Research, Research

Yount S. 1994 (ca.). Nevada EMSC Implementation Project [Final report]. Carson City, NV: Nevada Health Division, 28 pp.

Annotation: [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-155682.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Information Systems, Preventive Health Care Education, Professional Education in EMSC

ACEMS Training Committee, Noble B, and Southern Region Emergency Medical Services Council. [1993]. EMS for children: Prehospital preceptorship program. Anchorage, AK: Southern Region Emergency Medical Services Council, ca. 400 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides training in assessment and care of pediatric patients for emergency medical technicians and paramedics. It covers pediatric medical emergencies (including respiratory emergencies, poisonings, seizures, and infectious diseases) and pediatric trauma. The manual includes reprints of informational materials, post tests, and module evaluations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Southern Region Emergency Medical Services Council, 6130 Tuttle Place, Anchorage, AK 99507, Telephone: (907) 562-6499 Fax: (907) 562-9893 Web Site: http://www.sremsc.org/ Price unknown.

Keywords: Emergency medical services for children, Emergency medical technicians, Training

Luten R, Foltin GL. 1993. Pediatric resources for prehospital care. (3rd ed.). Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 191 pp.

Annotation: This book is a collection of materials on emergency medical services for children (EMSC). Chapters focus on training of emergency medical technicians in caring for critically ill children, protocols for pediatric care in the prehospital setting, endotracheal intubation of pediatric patients by paramedics, and utilization of EMSC services by primary care physicians. State contacts for EMSC programs are listed, along with guidelines for planning and equipping a pediatric trauma center. Appendices include model EMSC legislation and a sample transfer form. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHG060.

Keywords: Child health, Critical care, Emergency medical services, Emergency medical services for children, Emergency medical technicians, Guidelines, Injuries, Protocols, Quality assurance, Training, Trauma care

American College of Emergency Physicians, Pediatric Emergency Medicine Committee. 1993. Paramedic pediatric education guidelines. Dallas, TX: American College of Emergency Physicians, 31 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines indicate subjects paramedics should know in order to provide care for children in emergency medical services. The guidelines cover: educational goals, learning objectives, psychomotor skills, methodologies for achieving community based education in pediatrics, field treatment protocols, prehospital equipment, protocol implementation strategies, and curriculum evaluation and quality control. The guidelines also include appendices which provide detailed suggestions for some of the preceding topics. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: American College of Emergency Physicians, P.O. Box 61991, Dallas, TX 75261-9911, Telephone: (800) 798-1822 Secondary Telephone: 972-550-0911 Contact Phone: (800) 798-1822 Fax: (972) 580-2816 E-mail: membership@acep.org Web Site: http://www.acep.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Emergency medical technicians, Guidelines, Pediatrics, Training

Bussone L, comp. 1993. Alaska EMS for Children Project: [Final report]. Juneau, AK: Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Emergency Medical Services Section, 50 pp.

Annotation: The Alaska Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) project addresses problems associated with pediatric emergencies in Alaska through interventions at various stages in disease and injury affecting children, and the system that is designed to combat these problems. The overall goal of the project is to improve the emergency medical care system in Alaska and its ability to treat and rehabilitate Alaska's acutely ill and injured children, as well as to prevent childhood injuries and deaths. The project addresses problems in the Emergency Medical Services system at all levels—prehospital, hospital, and rehabilitative services. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Education of health professionals, Emergency medical services for children, Emergency medical technicians, Emergency room personnel, Rehabilitation, Rural populations, Training, Trauma

Children's Hospital of the District of Columbia. 1970. Symposium on services for children with heart disease: Children's Hospital of the District of Columbia—Commemorating its 100th anniversary. [Washington, DC: Children's Hospital of the District of Columbia?], 116 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this conference was to assess present and past services for children with heart disease and to make recommendations regarding future goals to the Maternal and Child Health Service. Pediatric heart disease, its incidence, prevalence, mortality, and cost were discussed. Medical recommendations for future systems of care were also discussed, addressing congenital heart disease, rheumatic fever, regional specialty centers and catheterization laboratory standards. Manpower needs for surgeons, nurses, social service workers, and paramedical personnel were discussed. The administrative issues of regional, national, and state systems of care in the future were discussed as well. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Service]

Keywords: Children, Emergency medical technicians, Employment, Geographic factors, Heart catheterization, Heart diseases, Nurses, Rheumatic fever, Social workers, Surgeons

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.