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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (128 total).

Oregon Department of Human Resources, State Health Division, Emergency Medical Services Section, Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Project. n.d.. How to handle a child's medical emergency: Caring means preparing. Portland, OR: Oregon Department of Human Resources, 1 booklet (37 pp.), 1 brochure, 1 brochure original.

University of North Carolina, School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine; Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine; and District of Columbia, Department of Maternal, Child Health, Division of Injury Prevention and Emergency Medical Services for Children. n.d.. North Carolina emergency medical services for children: Pediatrics protocols for prehospital and emergency department management. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina, Department of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Charlotte, NC: Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine; Washington, DC: District of Columbia, Department of Maternal, Child Health, Division of Injury Prevention and Emergency Medical Services for Children, 35 pp.

Annotation: These protocols for emergency medical technicians and hospital personnel in North Carolina provide guidelines for triage, transport, and treatment of children who have suffered traumatic injuries or have life threatening conditions. The protocols are grouped in two sections; the first contains prehospital paramedic protocols; and the second contains hospital treatment protocols. The first section also includes guidelines for transport. The individual protocols are presented as flow-charts with the critical procedures indicated for each step in caring for the child. Conditions include: multiple trauma, head trauma, newborn resuscitation, poisoning, and seizures, among others. [Partially funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Carolinas Medical Center, Department of Emergency Medicine, 1000 Blythe Boulevard , Charlotte, NC 28203, Telephone: (704) 355-3658 Fax: (704) 355-7047 E-mail: EMresidency@CarolinasHealthCare.Org Price unknown.

Keywords: Emergency medical services for children, Emergency medical technicians, Hospital emergency services, Hospital personnel, Injuries, North Carolina, Protocols, Resources for professionals, Therapeutics

Pierce LR and Emergency Medical Services for Children National Resource Center, comps. n.d.. Emergency medical services for children thesaurus. Washington, DC: Emergency Medical Services for Children National Resource Center, 25 pp.

Annotation: This thesaurus has 244 terms, which are displayed alphabetically in hierarchies showing term relationships and scope notes and in subject groupings under the Emergency Medical Services for Children(EMSC) Library Catalog Headings. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Emergency medical services for children, Thesauri

Davidson L. n.d.. Demonstration Projects for Pediatric EMS Systems Components: [Final report]. Mobile, AL: University of South Alabama College of Medicine, 104 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the this project was to demonstrate effective models for the necessary components of an emergency medical services for children (EMSC) system and the integration of those components into currently operating adult-oriented systems. The project has outlined the six major components of an EMSC system: (l) System description, (2) prevention, (3) education, (4) standards of care, (5) quality assurance, and (6) research and development. The project comprised seven subprojects whose activities included educating the public, the prehospital care provider, and the rural physician about the assessment and management of pediatric emergencies; comparing the efficacy of ground versus air transport; defining the degree of psychological impairment caused by head injury; identifying the rehabilitation facilities available locally, regionally, and nationally; and increasing compliance with safety belt/child restraint legislation. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103332.

Keywords: Cost-Benefit Analysis, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency medical technicians, Facilities For, First Aid, Head Injuries, Health Professionals, Paramedics, Rehabilitation, Seat Belts/Restraints for Children

Fiser D. n.d.. Demonstration Project: Emergency Medical Services for Children: [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 44 pp.

Annotation: The Arkansas Demonstration Project utilized a broad-based approach to evaluate and improve the outcome of pediatric emergencies in Arkansas. It involved interaction with many statewide agencies, including various offices of the Arkansas Department of Health and the Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) of the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. The project was designed with four primary purposes: (1) Increase the level of knowledge regarding the consequences of critical illness and injury in children in the State of Arkansas; (2) improve the emergency medical services provided to those children during the project period and after, particularly to handicapped and minority children; (3) determine the effectiveness of the proposed methodologies for the reduction of morbidity and mortality associated with childhood illness and injury; and (4) determine effective methods of imparting the knowledge gained to other States in a manner resulting in the adoption of effective programs by those States. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-196947.

Keywords: Ambulances, Child Education of Health Professionals, Data Bases, Data Collection, Disabled, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), Emergency medical technicians, Minorities, Morbidity, Mortality, Networking

Danielson C. n.d.. Emergency Medical Services for Children: [Final report]. Augusta, ME: Maine State Board of Emergency Medical Services, 49 pp.

Annotation: This project developed and evaluated a rural emergency medical services for children (EMSC) demonstration program and provided assistance to other rural States in adopting the successful aspects of the program. The focus of the project was the development of a modular training program on care of pediatric emergencies that can be presented in appropriate segments to all levels of prehospital and emergency room personnel. Improved skills and knowledge in emergency care for children resulted in improved medical management of children requiring emergency care and reduced the consequences of the emergency events. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-198752.

Keywords: American Indians, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Room Personnel, Head injuries, Parent Education, Rural Populations

Spaite D. n.d.. Arizona Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona, 23 pp.

Annotation: The overall goal of the Arizona EMSC project was to reduce childhood mortality and morbidity by (1) providing broad-based training and education in pediatric emergency care to medical personnel involved in the prehospital and early hospital emergency medical care, and (2) helping establish childhood injury prevention programs throughout the State. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121909.

Keywords: Bicycle Helmets, Bicycle Safety, Car seats, Drowning, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Injury Prevention, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Programs, Professional Education in EMSC, Seat Belts

Fiser D. n.d.. Outcome Evaluation of Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Little Rock, AR: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 27 pp.

Annotation: The primary purpose and goal of this project was the validation of scales for measuring cognitive and physical or general adaptive morbidity, the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPC) and Pediatric Overall provides the means of evaluation needed to reach the EMSC goal to evaluate emergency medical care of children as outlined in the EMSC 5 year plan. A secondary purpose of the study was to obtain supplemental data on the nature and severity of adverse outcomes of psychosocial adjustment for children and families with a broad range of cognitive and functional outcomes following childhood emergencies. This study and other work by the investigator will facilitate the identification of the population of children and families at high risk for emergencies in order to guide the development of a suitable intervention in a future phase of study. A cohort of 200 PICU discharges were accumulated consecutively over a 22 month enrollment period to a maximum of 25 patients in each of the eight cells of the study. The patients were then followed up with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale and a battery of psychological tests. We find that the POPC and PCPC scales differentiate well between children of varying cognitive and general adaptive functional abilities as measured by the StanfordBinet, Bayley, and Vineland instruments. They should provide a useful tool for future studies which require outcome assessment. Maternal assessments may not be suitable substitutes for clinician assessments as mothers tend to rate children lower (less morbidity) than the nurse rater. Additional outcome analyses are still in progress. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-128317.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emotional Health, Mental Health, Morbidity, Research

Hubinger J. n.d.. Michigan Model for Improving Pediatric Emergency Medical Services (EMS for Children in Michigan [Final report]. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Public Health,

Annotation: This project sought to reduce the number and the impact of childhood injuries, especially those due to fire and violence. Two broad objectiveswere written for year 3 activities, involving methods of training emergency providers (training objective), and public/student education, smoke detector battery distribution, and school injury reporting (injury prevention objective). Materials developed include a 1993 injury prevention calendar, a statewide curriculum for pediatric emergencies, and data reports on prehospital and inpatient studies. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121917.

Keywords: Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Injury Prevention, Professional Education in EMSC, School Age Children

Leggett G. n.d.. Pediatric Emergency Medical Services System Development for New Jersey [Final report]. Trenton, NJ: New Jersey Department of Health, 5 pp.

Annotation: This project had two components: Part 1, based in the Department of Health's Office of Emergency Medical Services, coordinated project efforts and served as a focus for emergency medical services for children (EMSC) in the State, including children with special health needs and minority children and their families. Part 2 involved the State's emergency medical services (EMS) community in three subcontracts that addressed (1) training for emergency medical technicians, paramedics, physicians, and nurses; (2) pediatric trauma issues; and (3) pediatric illness issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-155708.

Keywords: Databases, Education, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Injury Prevention, Preventive Health Care, Professional Education in EMSC

Olson L. n.d.. New Mexico Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Albuquerque, NM: University of New Mexico, 5 pp.

Annotation: The mortality, morbidity, and economic burden associated with childhood trauma and illness represent a serious public health problem in New Mexico. This is particularly true for rural and minority families. The long term goals of this project were to reduce the frequency and seriousness of negative outcomes for children and families who have suffered an emergency and to promote preventive activities directed at reducing injuries that generate pediatric emergencies. The project demonstrated progress in reaching these long term goals through: (1) increased childhood injury prevention programs statewide including promoting EMTs to be prevention advocates in their communities; (2) improved clinical care in the pediatric emergency medical system which includes prehospital and hospital care providers; (3) improved data collection and analysis for pediatric injury and illness; and (4) coalition building. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB98-155716.

Keywords: American Indians, Bilingual Services, Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Injury Prevention, Rural Population

van der Jagt E. n.d.. Development of a Regional Pediatric Data Surveillance System [Final report]. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester, 51 pp. pp.

Annotation: The goals of this regional pediatric data surveillance system were to: (1) Convert a regional manual data collection system (developed with a previous EMSC grant) to a computerized one using existing data bases at each hospital and modern computer technology; (2) expedite centralized data acquisition via diskettes/modems; (3) expand the data set to include data about prehospital and inpatient utilization and outcomes; (4) enhance the accuracy of the data by using ICD-9 coding for final diagnoses; and (5) provide the data to area hospitals and health agencies for local and regional improvements in care. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121925.

Keywords: Computers, Data, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services for Children

Peppe K. n.d.. Emergency Medical Services for Children (in 14 Rural Counties) [Final report]. Columbus, OH: Ohio Department of Health, 61 pp. pp.

Annotation: The project's major goal was to prevent childhood emergencies and to improve emergency medical services for children in Ohio by building local support and developing effective local emergency medical systems with linkage to referral centers. Specific project goals included establishing local emergency medical service (EMS) advisory councils; developing train-the-trainer programs for local emergency department personnel; developing networks linking local EMS systems with local emergency department personnel and pediatric medical consultants, and linking demonstration areas with regional children's hospitals and pediatric medical centers; and developing public information and education programs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-124176.

Keywords: Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Room Personnel, Rural Population

Stuemky J. n.d.. Developing and Improving the Capacity of Existing Pediatric Emergency Medical Services in Oklahoma [Final report]. Oklahoma City, OK: University of Oklahoma,

Annotation: The State of Oklahoma has a limited and fragmented EMS system that has not adequately addressed the needs of its pediatric population. To decrease the negative outcomes of pediatric emergency care, this project: (1) Established a prehospital- and hospital-based data collection system to provide definition of emergency medical services for children (EMSC) and identify negative outcome factors; (2) developed and assisted a statewide consortium in support of EMSC issues; (3) provided pediatric prehospital and hospital care training to emergency medical technicians, nurses, and physicians; and (4) worked with Native Americas and Hispanic populations to prevent child abuse and related injuries. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Child Abuse, Data Collection, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Emergency Medical Technicians, Pediatric Advanced Life Support Programs, Professional Education in EMSC, Shaken Infant Syndrome

Buttrey J. n.d.. Emergency Medical Services for Children [Final report]. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Department of Health, 56 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this project was to enhance existing capabilities in emergency medical services for children (EMSC) to reduce mortality and morbidity from injuries and critical illnesses among infants and children. This scope of the project was regional, in collaboration with Idaho, Oregon, and Washington EMSC projects. In addition, specific funding targeted project activities to enhance EMSC capabilities in Wyoming, Montana, and Utah. The four major goals of the Utah EMSC program were to: (1) Develop a comprehensive intermountain pediatric emergency medical services (EMS) data base; (2) reduce the morbidity and mortality of Native American children living in the region; (3) educate emergency care providers in the region about the capability, availability, and response times of existing intermountain regional air transport systems; and (4) establish consistent regional protocols and educational programs for EMS systems throughout the intermountain region. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121883.

Keywords: American Indians, Burns, Data Collection, Data bases, Emergency Medical Services for Children, Poisons, Rural Population

Eichelberger M. n.d.. Pediatric Emergency Medical Services Training Program [Final report]. Washington, DC: Children's Hospital National Medical Center, 171 pp.

Annotation: This project aimed to supplement the three (out of 110) hours in pediatric and childbirth training mandated by the U.S. Department of Transportation's curriculum standards for basic EMT training. The project trained EMTs who were nominated by state EMS directors and who returned to train other EMTs in their states. Audiovisual aids were made available to graduates for their use in local training. By the end of 1988 the project trained 190 EMTs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB92-103415.

Keywords: Continuing Education, Education of Health Professionals, Emergency Medical Services, Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs), Injuries

Southern Region Emergency Medical Services Council. n.d.. APLS nurse instructor notebook: Nurse track lectures. Anchorage, AK: Southern Region Emergency Medical Services Council, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This training course is intended for pediatric nurses. This document contains information about advanced pediatric life support; topics include the difference between pediatric and adult patients; seizure management; triage; practice cases; and stabilization and transfer. Handouts and a course evaluation form are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Southern Region Emergency Medical Services Council, 6130 Tuttle Place, Anchorage, AK 99507, Telephone: (907) 562-6499 Fax: (907) 562-9893 Web Site: http://www.sremsc.org/ Price unknown.

Keywords: Emergency medical services for children, Pediatric nursing, Training

Fish-Parcham C. 2018. Treating pain is not enough: Why states' emergency dental benefits fall short. Washington, DC: Families USA, 12 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This document presents information from a survey conducted by Families USA of 14 states that cover emergency-only oral health services. Selected topics include what can be learned from states that offer emergency-only coverage, how responding states’ dental benefits differ, states in which managed-care plans provide adults with extra offerings, costs to states of paying for emergency department visits when appropriate oral health services are not available, the limited availability of alternative oral health care resources for adults, and the inadequacy of emergency-only dental care for individuals with serious medical conditions.

Contact: Families USA, 1225 New York Avenue, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 628-3030 Fax: (202) 347-2417 E-mail: info@familiesusa.org Web Site: http://www.familiesusa.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Dental insurance, Emergency medical services, Low income groups, Medicaid, Oral health, Oral health care, State programs, Surveys

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2017. Availability, outcomes, and federal support related to pediatric trauma care. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report describes what is known about the availability of trauma centers for children and the outcomes for children treated at different types of facilities. The report also examines how, if at all, federal agencies are involved in supporting pediatric trauma care and how these activities are coordinated. Topics include the location of high-level pediatric trauma centers, the percentage of children who live within 30 miles of a high-level pediatric trauma center, and how well such centers work to lower mortality. Additional topics include federal interagency coordination to support hospital-based pediatric trauma care activities and training and resources available to physicians and nurses for pediatric trauma care. Examples are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website. Document Number: GAO-17-334.

Keywords: Access to health care, Emergency medical services for children, Federal agencies, Health care delivery, Injuries, Interagency cooperation, Outcome and process assessment, Pediatric care, Pediatric hospitals, Training, Trauma care, Trauma centers, Work force

[U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau]. 2016. Resource guide for states and communities caring for infants and children affected by Zika (upd.). [Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau], 18 pp. (Latest update 10/21/2016; document doesn't cite author/publisher; received via AMCHP's Emerging Issues Committee. (JMB))

Annotation: This resource is designed to assist states and communities in developing a coordinated response to the immediate and long term needs of infants and children affected by Zika virus (ZIKV), and their families. Contents include an overview of ZIKV, infection, and outcomes; systems of care as a public health approach for comprehensive care for infants and children exposed to ZIKV; and an overview of federal and state programs serving children affected by ZIKV. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child health, Community coordination, Comprehensive health care, Emergency medical services for children, Federal programs, Health care systems, Infant health, Infection control, Neonatal screening, Policy development, Population surveillance, Program coordination, Program planning, Quality assurance, Resources for professionals, Service coordination, Service integration, Special health care needs, State programs, Systems development, Virus diseases, Work force

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.