Skip Navigation

Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 9 (9 total).

Chiang RJ. 2016. A guide for incorporating health & wellness into school improvement plans. Atlanta, GA: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 30 pp.

Annotation: This guide for public health agencies and other partners the purpose and role of improvement plans in schools and districts. The guide also outlines opportunities to incorporate health and wellness-related goals and aligned activities into school improvement plans and provides examples from schools and districts that have done it.

Contact: National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, 2200 Century Parkway, Suite 250, Atlanta, GA 30345, Telephone: (770) 458-7400 Web Site: https://chronicdisease.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Educational objectives, Goals, Health objectives, Planning, Program improvement, Public private partnerships, School districts, Schools, Systems development

Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center. 2014. Making the link between health and school readiness. [Elk Grove Village, IL]: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, 41 pp.

Annotation: This tool describes the link between health and school readiness to help Head Start programs design school-readiness goals that incorporate health strategies, including oral health strategies. Topics include how program leaders can use the tool, links between health and the Child Development and Early Learning Framework domains, other school readiness goals, and health services that impact school readiness.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Educational objectives, Goals, Head Start, Health services, Infants, Learning activities, Pregnant women, Program planning, School readiness, Young children

Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability. 2013. Autism plan for Georgia. Atlanta, GA: Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a plan for improving access to comprehensive, coordinated health care and related services for children, youth, and adults with autism spectrum disorder and related developmental disabilities in Georgia. The plan addresses the following ten areas of activity: early identification and screening; referral and diagnosis; medical, behavioral health, and dental services; family support; early intervention and preschool services; elementary and secondary education; community services and supports; transition from youth to adult systems; adult services and supports; and emergency preparedness and first responders. For each area, the report provides a definition, quality indicators (problem statements and data drivers), and recommendations (objectives). The report also describes foundational supports considered in developing the recommendations including work force, awareness, informational resources, finances, and policy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Georgia State University School of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 75 Piedmont Avenue, Suite 514, Atlanta, GA 30303, Telephone: (404) 413-1281 Fax: (404) 413-1012 E-mail: cld@gsu.edu Web Site: https://disability.publichealth.gsu.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Autism, Community based services, Comprehensive health care, Diagnosis, Disaster planning, Early intervention, Educational objectives, Family centered care, Family support services, Financial planning, Georgia, Health care delivery, Life course, Policy development, Program coordination, Referrals, Screening, Special health care needs, State programs, Systems development, Transition planning, Work force

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Adolescent and School Health. 2012. Health education curriculum analysis tool (HECAT). Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

Annotation: This resource provides guidance and appraisal tools for assessing a health education curriculum. Contents include an overview of school health education, curriculum, and curriculum selection and development; step-by-step guidance for organizing a health education curriculum review and conducting an analysis; tools for scoring the accuracy and acceptability of curriculum content, feasibility of implementation, and affordability of the curriculum materials; tools for scoring fundamental characteristics of a health education curriculum; and tools for scoring concepts and skills relevant to topics such as alcohol and other drugs, healthy eating, mental and emotional health, physical activity, safety, tobacco, and violence. Forms for summarizing appraisal scores for a single curriculum or comparing scores across curricula are included.

Contact: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Curricula, Early childhood education, Educational objectives, Health education, Schools, Teaching

Woodring B. 1998. Standards and guidelines for pre-licensure and early professional education for the nursing care of children and their families. (Rev. ed.). [Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, School of Nursing], 42 pp.

Annotation: This manual contains standards and guidelines for pediatric nursing education. It is the second edition of a manual that was the result of a working conference held in Chicago, Illinois January 27-30, 1994, which was attended by nurse educators from academic and clinical settings. The manual is organized around the concepts of child, family and social factors; clinical problems or areas; and care delivery. The format includes process and outcome criteria for each concept. The new edition provides an integration of materials related to prevention, and pre-hospital and emergent care. There is a strong emphasis on home and community-based care. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHK106.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Community based services, Educational objectives, Families, Family centered services, Guidelines, Nursing education, Pediatric nursing, Prevention, Standards

Pridham KF, Broome M, with Baoni M, Woodring B. 1994 (ca.). Standards and guidelines for pre-licensure and early professional education for the nursing care of children and their families. [Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin, School of Nursing], 38 pp.

Annotation: This manual contains standards and guidelines for pediatric nursing education. It was the result of a working conference held in Chicago, Illinois between January 27-30, 1994 which was attended by nurse educators from academic and clinical settings. The manual discusses the background for the guidelines, and describes goals that fall into the following categories: child, family, and societal factors; clinical problems or areas; and care delivery. The manual reviews the theoretical bases of the standards, considers the knowledge needed for the nursing care of children and their families including children with special health needs, and examines ways of learning and developing, courses, and ways of evaluating teaching and learning experiences. For each standard, the manual describes the basic concept, provides a definition and goal statement, and suggests process and outcome criteria. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website. Document Number: HRSA Info. Ctr. MCHH112.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Community based services, Educational objectives, Families, Family centered services, Guidelines, Nursing education, Pediatric nursing, Standards

Demarest EJ, Reisner ER, Anderson LM, Humphrey DC, Farquhar E, Stein SE. 1993. Review of research on achieving the nation's readiness goal. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, 82 pp.

Annotation: This report reviews the research related to the nation's school readiness goal (that by the year 2000, all children in America will start school ready to learn) and identifies gaps in the knowledge needed to inform policy makers and practitioners. It suggests a framework for thinking about the meaning of school readiness and the factors that may influence it. Individual sections explore the concept of readiness, the contributions of families and communities in achieving readiness, and the contributions of early childhood education programs in achieving readiness. The report encourages practitioners and policy makers to think systematically about how to build supports for child development and readiness into the system and how to remove constraints.

Keywords: Educational objectives, Goals, National programs, Policy development, Research reviews, School readiness

National Advisory Council on Indian Education. 1990. Educating the American Indian/Alaska Native family: 16th annual report to the United States Congress fiscal year 1989. Washington, DC: National Advisory Council on Indian Education, 193 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the activities and recommendations of the National Advisory Council on Indian Education for fiscal year 1989. The annual report is required by P.L. 100–297. The report includes an update of Indian education statistics and a discussion of the national education goals as they relate to the American Indian and Alaska Native families. The appendices include profiles of outstanding programs and texts of public laws and regulations that affect Indian education programs.

Contact: National Advisory Council on Indian Education, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington, DC 20202 , Telephone: (202) 732-1353 Secondary Telephone: (202) 205-2528 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oese/oie/nacie.html

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Education, Educational objectives, Federal programs

Ambulatory Pediatric Association. 1990. Educating pediatric residents to provide health care to underserved children: A conference sponsored by the Ambulatory Pediatric Association. McLean, VA: Ambulatory Pediatric Association, 102 pp.

Annotation: These are the proceedings of a conference held in Alexandria, Virginia, March 4-5, 1990. The conference focused on issues related to educating pediatric residents to provide health care to children who are currently underserved. The proceedings include a list of the participants, recommendations based upon the conference, and the papers presented at the conference accompanied by responses and open discussions. Papers included the following topics, among others: understanding the challenge to residents and inspiring them to action, helping residents learn to nurture the unnurtured, organizing practices for underserved children, and models that can be used to educate residents. The models focused on children in urban areas, rural Midwestern children, the working poor and illegal aliens, and children of migrant farm workers. Other topics included methods of financing health care for these children and issues in public policy. [The conference was funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Academic Pediatric Association, 6728 Old McLean Village, McLean, VA 22101, Telephone: (703) 556-9222 Fax: (703) 556-8729 E-mail: info@academicpeds.org Web Site: http://www.ambpeds.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Access to health care, Children, Conferences, Curricula, Educational objectives, Health care financing, Internship and residency, Pediatricians, Public policy, Underserved communities

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.