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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (62 total).

Williams JR, ed., Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff. n.d.. Mount Zion survey: Housing, nutrition, education. Minneapolis, MN: [University of Minnesota, School of Public Health], Systems Development Project , 17 pp. (Comment series no: 1-5 (37))

Annotation: This paper reports a survey to make the Mount Zion Hospital and Medical Center, Comprehensive Child Care Project Staff knowledgeable and able to support all expressions of concern with substantive information. The survey among a sample of project families attempted to delineate the family's housing situation in regard to space, safety and sanitation; the nutritional status in regard to availability of food, shopping practices and dietary intake; and the children's educational placement and experiences in school and the parents' perception of the schools. The survey is also designed to document the adequacy and effectiveness of existing social services and agencies in the community to deal with these problems. This paper is produced as part of the documentation and assessment of the effect of P.L. 89-97, Title V. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Children and Youth Projects, Comprehensive health care, Educational factors, Federal MCH programs, Housing, Nutritional status, Program evaluation, Social services, Surveys, Title V programs

University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health. n.d.. Ethnicity and maternal and child health care. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 75 pp.

Annotation: This unpublished document contains a set of 4 teaching modules: (1) Ethnicity and Healthy Birth Outcomes; (2) Ethnicity and Genetic Disease; (3) Culture and AIDS Prevention in Adolescents; and (4) Using the Internet in Maternal and Child Health. Each of the modules contains lesson objectives; a suggested reading list followed by a section of summaries; and suggested assignments and class presentations geared towards the objectives discussed at the beginning of each module. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Maryland School of Social Work, Center for Maternal and Child Health Social Work Education, 525 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 706-7533 Fax: (410) 706-6046 Web Site: http://cmchswe.umaryland.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Disease prevention, Educational materials, Ethnic factors, Internet, MCH training, Maternal health

Driscoll AK, Osterman MJK. 2018. Maternal characteristics of prenatal WIC receipt in the United States, 2016. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief; no. 298)

Annotation: This report describes prenatal Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) receipt in the United States in 2016 by state and by maternal age, race and Hispanic origin, and education. For each topic, key points are provided, and bar graphs illustrate statistical information.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Educational factors, Hispanic Americans, Maternal nutrition, Nutrition programs, Pregnant women, Prenatal nutriton, Racial factors, Statistical data, WIC program

Continelli T, Bruce C, Roberts E, Martiniano R. 2015. A profile of oral health providers in New York State. Rensselaer, NY: Center for Health Workforce Studies, 4 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This research brief provides information about the dentist and dental hygienist work force in New York state, including the concentration of dentists vs. dental hygienists, the concentration of dentists in urban vs. rural areas, the diversity of the oral health work force compared with the diversity of the state’s population, the ages of dentists and dental hygienists, and the educational attainment of dental hygienists. Sources and limitations of the data are described.

Contact: Center for Health Workforce Studies, University of Albany, State University of New York, School of Public Health, One University Place, Suite 220, Rensselaer, NY 12144-3445, Telephone: (518) 402-0250 Fax: (518) 402-0252 E-mail: chws@health.ny.gov Web Site: http://chws.albany.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Age factors, Cultural diversity, Dental hygienists, Dentists, Educational attainment, Health disparities, New York, Oral health, Rural environment, Urban environment, Work force

Child Trends. 2014. World family map 2014: Mapping family change and child well-being outcomes (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Child Trends, 67 pp.

Annotation: This report provides indicators of family well-being worldwide. Topics include family structure, socioeconomics, processes, and culture. The report also includes an essay on union stability and early childhood health in developing countries, as well as a brief analysis of psychological distress among children and adolescents ages 9-16 in the European Union.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Comparative analysis, Cultural factors, Data, Educational factors, Families, Geographic factors, International health, Socioeconomic factors, Trends

Hynes M. 2014. Don't call them dropouts: Understanding the experiences of young people who leave high school before graduation. Washington, DC: America's Promise Alliance, 71 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from interviews and surveys of young people across the United States about what leads to leaving school before graduation. Contents include findings on the relationship between interrupted enrollment and family violence and abuse; school safety; violence in the neighborhood; personal and family health challenges; unsupportive or unresponsive school policies; family abandonment (death, incarceration, other events); family absence; instability of place (residential mobility, school mobility, homelessness); school salience; peer influence and support; and school and community support.

Contact: America's Promise Alliance, 1101 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0600 Fax: (202) 657-0601 E-mail: info@americaspromise.org Web Site: http://www.americaspromise.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescents, Adverse effects, Educational attainment, Graduation, Life course, National surveys, Resilience, Risk factors, School attendance, School dropouts, School failure, Social support, Supported employment

Jones CA. 2014. Uplifting the whole child: Using wraparound services to overcome social barriers to learning. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center; Cambridge, MA: Rennie Center for Education Research and Policy, 17 pp. (Roadmap to expanding opportunity: Evidence on what works in education)

Annotation: This paper describes wraparound services (defined as student and family supports integrated with and often delivered in schools) to address social and non-academic barriers to student learning. Contents include background, a summary of three case studies (in New York City, Tulsa, and California Healthy Start), five key features of a high-quality wraparound services model that could be implemented across Massachusetts, and a statewide cost projection. The report concludes with a discussion of policy considerations.

Contact: Massachusetts Budget and Policy Center, 15 Court Square, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 426-1228 Web Site: http://www.massbudget.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Costs, Educational reform, Family support services, Health services delivery, Learning, Local initiatives, Massachusetts, Policy development, Program models, Service integration, Social factors, State initiatives, Students

D'Angelo AV, Rich L, Kwiatt J. 2013. Integrating family support services into schools: Lessons from the Elev8 Initiative. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief uses data from Chapin Hall’s evaluation of the Elev8 Full-Service Schools Initiative as a case study to focus on the challenges and benefits of offering economic support services to low income families at schools. Based on their findings, the authors conclude that the Elev8 Initiative, which brings together schools, families, and the community in underserved neighborhoods, shows promise as a way to provide support services to families while improving the educational opportunities for their children. Using lessons learned from the Eval8 Initiativ, the authors present recommendations for future efforts to integrate economic support services into schools. Their suggested strategies include hiring long-term staff members to build trusting relationships with parents; offering economic support services in conjunction with a broader array of services; ensuring clear lines of communication between partner organizations; and taking steps to ensure parents’ privacy.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Economic factors, Educational factors, Evaluation, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Models, Partnerships, School-linked programs

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health . 2013. Health snapshot: Hispanic adolescents in the United States. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health , (E-updates)

Annotation: This website provides information about Hispanic adolescents in the United States related to health care coverage, adolescent pregnancy, educational attainment, mental health, substance abuse, and weight. For each topic, links to information and programs are included. Background information about this population is also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health, 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Cultural factors, Educational attainment, Mental health, Ethnic factors, Health insurance, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Programs, Substance abuse

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Healthy Eating Research. 2013. Why does education matter so much to health?. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2 pp. (Health policy snapshot: Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief focuses on the important of education to health. The brief provides an overview of the issue and discusses the impact of education on longevity, disease, and health disparities; the National Prevention Strategy that targets education to improve health; and trends.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Educational attainment, Health, Health promotion, Income factors, Obesity, Prevention, Programs, Public policy, Trends

Johnston J and Stratus. 2013. Putting children first: Scenarios for the future of children's health and well being in the U.S.. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 35 pp. (Report)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the process by which scenarios about the future of children's health and well-being were created for a forum of philanthropists and children' health experts held in Aspen, CO, in July 2012. The report shares the scenarios, which paint four different portraits of how the state of children's health and well-being could evolve over the next several decades. The report also shares insights and implications that emerged from participants' interactions with the scenarios at the forum, as well as how these scenarious might be used to empower new actions and strategies for transforming the future of children's health and well-being.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child development, Child health, Economic factors, Educational factors, Families, Family support services, Health services, Low income groups, Social factors, Social services, Trends

Hernandez DJ, Napierala JS. 2013. Diverse children: Race, ethnicity, and immigration in America's new non-majority generation. New York, NY: Foundation for Child Development, 36 pp. (Disparities among America's children, no. 1)

Annotation: This report focuses on the current well-being and future prospects of children in eight distinct race-ethnic-immigrant-status groups. The report discusses 19 indicators that focus on family economic resources, health, educational attainment, and demographic circumstances. The report presents two sets of findings for 2010, First, the report discusses each indicator in turn, with results for each race-ethnic-immigrant-status groups, highlighting key disparities across groups. The report then presents an overview, summarizing the overall pattern of disparities across all 19 indicators taken together.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Educational attainment, Ethnic factors, Families, Health, Immigrants, Racial factors

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. "Statutory rape:" Sex between young teens and older individuals-Indicators on children and youth. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 14 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on instances in which children and adolescents under age 15 engage in sexual relationships with someone at least 3 years older (statutory rape). Topics include importance; trends; differences by race and by Hispanic origin; by parental education; and by age at first sex; state, local, and international estimates; national goals; and related indicators. Statistical data are presented throughout the report. A definition of statutory rape is provided.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescent sexuality, Age factors, Educational factors, High risk adolescents, Racial factors, Rape, Risk factors, Sexual behavior, Sexual intercourse, Statistical data, Trends

Hernandez DJ, Napierala JS. 2012. Children in immigrant families: Essential to America's future. New York, NY: Foundation for Child Development, 37 pp. (FCD child and youth well-being index (CWI) policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on areas in which children in immigrant families are advantaged or disadvantaged, compared with children with both parents born in the United States. The brief presents findings from 1994 to 2010 in the following categories: overall well-being, family economic well-being, health, educational attainment, community engagement, and social relationships. Results for select countries and regions of origin are also presented.

Contact: Foundation for Child Development, 295 Madison Avenue, 40th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 867-5777 Fax: (212) 867-5844 E-mail: info@fcd-us.org Web Site: http://www.fcd-us.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Communities, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Families, Immigrants, International health, Relationships, Research, Social interaction, Statistical data

Grantmakers In Health. 2012. Striving for health equity: Opportunities as identified by leaders in the field. Washington, DC: Grantmakers In Health, 29 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on health and health care inequities, highlights the current state of the health disparities arena; identifies key opportunities for reduction and elimination strategies, including areas of opportunity arising from key health reform provisions; and offers a set of recommendations and options for funders considering taking more actionable steps to support health disparities elimination and reduction efforts. The paper offers definitions of key terms, provides a health-equity framework, and summarizes key themes and recommendations.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Costs, Economic factors, Educational factors, Financing, Geographic factors, Health, Health care reform, High risk groups, Low income groups, Racial factors, Sociocultural factors, Socioeconomic factors, health care

Wolniak KM, Neishi KM, Rude JD, Gebhardt Z. 2012. The state of our nation's youth: 2012-2013. Alexandria, VA: Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, 70 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a 2012 survey of young people (ages 14-23) that focused on identifying factors that are thought to be contributing to the decreasing number of students completing college today (for example, accessibility to college education and the affordability of college). Key findings are presented in the following categories: factors for a successful life; views on family and relationships; spending time outside of school and work; staying in touch and aware; facing challenges; outlook on politics and the future of the country; high schools; college preparation and enrollment; and employment and careers. Summaries of the survey findings describe differences based on the status of the student (whether they were in high school or had graduated) and how engaged and involved they were in school. The report also discuses career aspirations and the current employment status of young people. A description of the research methodology used and a complete list of data tables is included.

Contact: Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans, 99 Canal Center Plaza, Alexandria, VA 22314, Telephone: (703) 684-9444 Fax: (703) 684-9445 E-mail: association@horatioalger.org Web Site: http://www.horatioalger.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Education, Educational attainment, Factors, Motivation, Research, Statistics, Surveys, Young adults, Youth

Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry. 2012. What to feed your smile: Oral health and nutrition. Lincoln, NE: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry, 6 p. (Watch your mouth!)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the importance of nutrition to oral health. Topics include healthy snacking, avoiding drinks containing sugar, the effect of saliva on oral health, how to keep the mouth healthy while eating a vegetarian diet, and vitamins and minerals essential for healthy bones and teeth.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Oral Health and Dentistry, 301 Centennial Mall South, Lincoln, NE 68509, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 Web Site: http://dhhs.ne.gov/publichealth/Pages/dental_index.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Dietary guidelines, Disease prevention, Educational materials, Nutrition, Oral health, Protective factors, Risk factors, Snacks, Vitamins

Currie J. 2011. Inequality at birth: Some causes and consequences. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 42 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 16798)

Annotation: This paper offers evidence on the issue of whether families with low incomes and those who are members of minority groups are disproportionately exposed to environmental hazards. The paper reviews some evidence about the determinants of health at birth and focuses in particular on prenatal exposure to pollution. Topics include endowments at birth and future outcomes and health at birth and environmental justice.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Educational attainment, Environmental influences, Environmental pollution, Families, Infant health, Low birthweight, Low income groups, Racial factors

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2011. Immigrant children. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 266 pp. (The future of children; v. 21, no. 1, Spring 2011)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children examines the well-being of immigrant children and what can be done to improve their education attainment, health, social and cognitive development, and long-term prospects for economic mobility. The issue discusses demographic trends, family arrangements, educational trends and differentials, health status, social integration, and participation in welfare and other public programs. Policies to improve the well-being of immigrant chldren are also presented.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 267 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544, Telephone: (609) 258-5894 E-mail: foc@princeton.edu Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-6-6.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Cognitive development, Demography, Economic factors, Educational attainment, Families, Health, Immigrants, Public policy, Trends, Welfare

Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Human Needs. 2011. County health calculator. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation,

Annotation: This interactive online application shows -- for the United States, states, or counties -- the impact that education and income have on health. The application allows visitors to change variables for income and education outcomes for any county and then view the consequences for mortality rates. Data elements include deaths per year, deaths per 100,000 people (death rate), mortality rate, deaths averted per year, and percentage of deaths averted per year.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 50 College Road East, Princeton, NJ 08540-6614, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Educational attainment, Low income groups, Mortality, Online systems, Socioeconomic factors, Statistical data

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.