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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (26 total).

Aspen Education & Society Program and Council of Chief State School Officers. 2017. Leading for equity: Opportunities for state education chiefs. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers, 32 pp.

Annotation: This guide defines educational equity and describes actions state education chiefs can take to create a more equitable education system in their state. Topics include setting and communicating an equity vision and measurable targets; focusing on the state education agency; creating accountability for equity; engaging local education agencies and providing tailored differentiated support; allocating resources to achieve fiscal equity; investing in the youngest learners; monitoring equitable implementation of standards and assessments; focusing on teachers and leaders; focusing on conditions of learning (school culture, climate, and social-emotional development); and ensuring families have access to high-quality educational options that align to community needs.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Accountability, Assessments, Communication, Educational change, Equal opportunities, Family centered services, Leadership, Learning, Measures, Policy development, Program development, Public education, Resource allocation, Schools, Standards, State education agencies, Students, Teachers, Teaching

Erikson C. 2017. Health workforce research centers: Key findings 2013–2016. Washington, DC: George Washington University, Health Workforce Institute, 32 pp.

Annotation: This report provides an overview of how the collective work of six health work force research centers has contributed to a better understanding of critical health work force challenges. The report describes the establishment of the centers, the evolving health work force configuration, job growth and career paths in middle- and low-skill health occupations, and work force strategies to increase access to quality health care. Topics include the effect of system-level transformations on team roles and human resources, emerging occupations, expanded roles, supply and demand, training needs, career pathways, team models and staffing arrangements, the role of technology in improving access to health care, and the relationship between training location and other factors influencing supply and utilization.

Contact: George Washington University, Health Workforce Institute, 2176 K Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-3423 Web Site: http://www.gwhwi.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Careers, Educational change, Evolution, Health occupations, Models, Policy development, Professional education, Professional training, Quality assurance, Research, Role, Teamwork, Technology, Work force

Wiener R, Goldstein M. 2016. Advancing equity through ESSA: Strategies for state leaders. Washington, DC: Council of Chief State School Officers and Aspen Institute, Education and Society Program, 36 pp.

Annotation: This document for state leaders presents a framework for advancing equity in education through the implementation of the Every Student Succeeds Act. The framework identifies eight equity priorities and illustrates how states could leverage the federal law to improve equity in opportunity and outcomes for all students. Topics include closing funding gaps, improving low-performing schools, increasing access to effective teachers and leaders, supporting English learners, increasing access to advanced coursework, addressing disproportionate discipline practices, addressing students' social-emotional learning needs, and improving access to high-quality instructional materials.

Contact: Council of Chief State School Officers, One Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Suite 700, Washington, DC 20001-1431, Telephone: (202) 336-7000 Fax: (202) 408-8072 E-mail: info@ccsso.org Web Site: http://www.ccsso.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational change, Equal opportunities, Federal legislation, Leadership, Learning, Mental health, Program improvement, Psychosocial development, Quality assurance, Students, Teaching

Cook-Harvey CM, Darling-Hammond L, Lam L, Mercer C, Roc M. 2016. Equity and ESSA: Leveraging educational opportunity through the Every Student Succeeds Act. Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute, 26 pp.

Annotation: This report for educators, researchers, policy influencers, and advocates examines provisions in the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) that can be used to advance equity and excellence in education for all students. The report reviews the provisions in the following four areas: higher-order skills for all students, multiple measures to assess school performance and progress, resource equity, and equity strategies and evidence-based interventions. Topics include standards and learning goals, assessments, opportunities to learn, school climate and student inclusion, equitable access to effective teaching, reporting school expenditures and tracking inequities, state plans' focus on equity, incentives for equitable funding approaches, how equity policy can leverage successes for new immigrant students, school improvement funding, early childhood education, community schools, and integration and school diversity.

Contact: Learning Policy Institute, 1530 Page Mill Road, Suite 200, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Telephone: (650) 332-9797 Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Barriers, Educational change, Equal opportunities, Intervention, Legislation, Low income groups, Measures, Public education, Resource allocation, Students, Systems development, Thinking, Underserved communities, Vulnerability

Hummel J, Phillips KE, Holt B, Hayes C. 2015. Oral health: An essential component of primary care. Seattle, WA: Qualis Health, Safety Net Medical Home Initiative, 67 pp.

Annotation: This paper presents an organizing framework for integrating oral health services into primary care. Topics include a call to action, why focusing on oral health is important, complementary roles for primary care and oral health care, lessons from behavioral-health-integration efforts, the oral-health-delivery framework, primary care transformation, overcoming barriers to integration, tips for primary care practices, and actions to spur implementation. An introductory video and case examples are also available.

Contact: Safety Net Medical Home Initiative, Qualis Health, P.O. Box 33400, Seattle, WA 98133-9700, Telephone: (800) 949-7536 Secondary Telephone: (800) 833-6384 Contact Phone: (206) 288-2462 Fax: (206) 368-2419 Contact E-mail: kathrynp@qualishealth.org Web Site: http://www.safetynetmedicalhome.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Community action, Dentistry, Educational change, Health care reform, Health services delivery, Oral health, Organizational change, Primary care, Reimbursement, Service integration

Newman S, Leep C, Ye J, Robin N. 2015. The changing public health landscape: Findings from the 2015 Forces of Change Survey. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 65 pp.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a survey of local health departments (LHDs) to assess the impact of forces that are affecting change in LHDs including health reform and billing for services. Topics include background and survey methods, budget cuts and job losses, changes in services, billing for clinical services, collaboration with non-profit hospitals, collaboration with primary care providers, and workforce skills.

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials, 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: City health agencies, Collaboration, County health agencies, Educational change, Health care reform, National surveys, Organizational change, Primary care, Reimbursement, Work force

American Dental Hygienists' Association. 2015. Transforming dental hygiene education and the profession for the 21st century. Chicago, IL: American Dental Hygienists' Association, 27 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes how changes in dental hygiene education and the profession will prepare graduates to serve health and wellness needs. Topics include the future needs of dental hygiene practice; strategies that will contribute to the expansion of oral health services to underserved populations, including mothers and children; and potential curriculum revisions and enhancements to better prepare dental hygienists for future practice.

Contact: American Dental Hygienists' Association, 444 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 3400, Chicago, IL 60611, Telephone: (312) 440-8900 Fax: (312) 440-1806 Web Site: http://www.adha.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Dental education, Dental hygiene, Dental hygienists, Educational change, Interdisciplinary approach, Oral health, Role, Trends, Work force

Hanlon C, Heider F. 2014. Bridging health care and early education system transformations to achieve kindergarten readiness in Oregon. Boston, MA: Build Initiative, 19 pp.

Annotation: This report describes how Oregon has leveraged opportunities to support a state-led, fundamental shift in how the health care and early education systems function and align with each other. Topics include why, what, and how Oregon is aligning these two systems, next steps and remaining challenges, and lessons learned. Key transformation milestones, organizational charts, and timelines of key alignment activities are also included.

Contact: Build Initiative, 89 South Street, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02111, Telephone: (617) 523-6565 E-mail: info@buildinitiative.org Web Site: http://www.buildinitiative.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational change, Educational reform, Health care reform, Health care systems, Integrated information systems, Kindergarten, Oregon, Organizational change, Service delivery systems, Social change, State initiatives, Systems development, Transitions, Young children

U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. 2014. Transforming Dental Hygiene Education: Proud Past, Unlimited Future–Proceedings of a symposium. Rockville, MD: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 31 pp.

Annotation: This report presents proceedings from a symposium held on September 18–20, 2013, in Chicago, Illinois, to discuss how the dental hygiene profession would need to transform its educational process to achieve expanded roles and new opportunities for dental hygienists in the future. Topics include the evolution of dental hygiene practice and curriculum development, perspectives on redefining education and practice, innovative collaboration models, implications of interprofessional education, funding transformational change, and strategic planning.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Conference proceedings, Dental education, Dental hygiene, Dental hygienists, Educational change, Interdisciplinary approach, Oral health, Role, Work force

Lazara A, Danaher J, Kraus R, Goode S, Hipps C, Festa C. 2011. Section 619 profile. (18th ed.). Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, 74 pp.

Annotation: This publication updates information provided by state coordinators on state policies, programs, and practices under the Preschool Grants Program (Section 619 of Part B) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Information includes: program administration, funding, interagency coordination, personnel, transition, monitoring, use of IEPs/ IFSPs, family-centered services, standards and outcomes, pre-kindergarten initiatives, initiatives for special populations, and services in least restrictive environments (LRE). The volume also includes a compilation of information on the Section 619 program from other sources: federal and state policies, data from www.ideadata.org, state training and TA systems, data on changes in children served by the program, and contact information for state and jurisdictional program coordinators.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Data, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Educational change, Federal grants, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part B, Preschool children, State programs

Interprofessional Education Collaborative. 2011. Team-based competencies: Building a shared foundation for education and clinical practice–Conference proceedings. Washington, DC: Interprofessional Education Collaborative, 21 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes discussions from a conference held on February 16-17, 2011, in Washington, DC, to review draft core competencies and create the ground work for an action plan for using the competencies to transform health professional education and health care delivery in the United States. Topics include the need for collaborative care, factors that could influence change, and steps to advance interprofessional collaboration in education and practice. The conference agenda, participant list, and references and resources are also included.

Contact: National Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education, University of Minnesota Academic Health Center, Minneapolis, MN Web Site: http://nexusipe.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Competency based education, Educational change, Health professions, Interdisciplinary approach, Professional education

Institute of Medicine, Committee on the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing. 2011. The future of nursing: Leading change, advancing health. Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences, 671 pp.

Annotation: This report explores how nurses' roles, responsibilities, and education should change significantly to meet the increased demand for care created by health care reform and to advance improvements in in the health care system. Contents include information about practice, education, and leadership transformation; data collection; and recommendations and research priorities.

Contact: National Academy of Sciences, 500 Fifth Street, N.W. , Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-2000 E-mail: webmailbox@nas.edu Web Site: http://www.nasonline.org/site/PageServer $79.95; also available from the website.

Keywords: Data collection, Educational change, Health care delivery, Health care reform, Leadership training, Nurses, Nursing education, Organizational change, Planning, Policy development, Professional training, Trends, Work force

Cicchetti D, Rappaport J, Sandler I, Weissberg RP, eds. 2000. The promotion of wellness in children and adolescents. Washington, DC: Child Welfare League of America, 515 pp.

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2000. Pioneer initiatives to reform education support programs. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 56 pp., exec. summ. (4 pp.). (A center report)

Annotation: This report covers a summit meeting, held on May 22, 2000, of a group of leaders involved in initiatives to reform and restructure education support programs. These initiatives are meeting the challenge of addressing persistent barriers to student learning and are doing so in ways designed to enhance healthy development. Participating were Memphis City Schools, Detroit Public Schools, Los Angeles Unified School District, Hawai'i Department of Education, Washington State Office of Public Instruction, California Department of Education, and New American School's Urban Learning Center. References are included. Accompanying materials may be downloaded from the Center for Mental Health in Schools' Web site or hard copy obtained on request. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Children, Education, Educational change, Hawaii, Initiatives, Michigan, Washington

Leslie L, Rappo P, Abelson H, Jenkins RR, Sewell SR. . 2000. Final report of the Future of Pediatric Education II Pediatric Generalists of the Future Workgroup. Pediatrics. 106(5):1199-1223. November 2000.,

Annotation: This report describes the results of the Task Force on Pediatric Education, whose goal was to proactively provide direction for pediatric education for the 21st century. (keep sentence two) These five factors include: (1) new patterns in morbidity and mortality; (2) advances in molecular biology and genetics; (3) changing sociodemographic and education makeup of the available pool of health care providers for children; (4) computer technology advances in data management and communications systems; and (5) paradigms shifts in the financing and delivery of child health services. (keep sentences.) The report concludes with references.

Contact: American Academy of Pediatrics, 345 Park Boulevard, Itasca, IL 60143, Telephone: (630) 626-6000 Secondary Telephone: (847) 434-4000 Fax: (847) 434-8000 Web Site: https://www.aap.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational change, Health education, Medical education, Medical personnel, Pediatrics, Professional education, Professional training, Trends

Center for Mental Health in Schools. 1999. Educational reform to address barriers to learning: Restructuring student support services and enhancing school-community partnerships. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 32 pp. (Center report)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of why and how policy makers should expand the focus of school reform to encompass a reframing and restructuring of education support programs and services and school-community partnerships. The body of the report discusses barriers to learning and what schools have done to overcome them. Appendices discuss restructuring all student support services in both the school and community, school-community partnerships, and restructuring a school board's committees. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Barriers, Community participation, Educational change, Educational programs, Learning, Motivation, Policy analysis, Schools, Students

Laudencia A. 1998. Saving our schools: Would vouchers create new solutions or new problems?. Washington, DC: Georgetown Public Policy Institute; Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, 21 pp. (DC Family Policy Seminar background briefing report)

Annotation: This report summarizes the DC Family Policy Seminar on using education vouchers in the District of Columbia schools. It includes a District community and school system profile, voucher proposals, advantages and disadvantages of vouchers, case studies of vouchers in other settings, other educational change efforts in the District, and policy considerations. Appendices list local and national resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.ncemch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, District of Columbia, Educational change, Government financing, Policy analysis, Private sector, Public schools

National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center at Johns Hopkins University, and Child and Adolescent Health Policy Center at The George Washington University. 1995. PIC briefing book: Welfare and education reform. Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 300 pp.

Annotation: This loose-leaf binder is a collection of articles and reports on welfare and education reform prepared for a February, 1995 meeting of the MCH Partnership for Information and Communication (PIC) Interorganizational Work Group. The background materials focus on the potential impact of proposed federal legislation on state programs, lessons learned from state reform efforts, the use of block grants to cap federal spending, and misconceptions about current welfare programs. Sections of the manual concentrate on the possible end of entitlement programs and the corresponding shifting of costs to the states, the relationship of health coverage to welfare dependency, the potential effect of current proposals on immigrant populations, and the adoption of national standards for education. The manual includes a summary of the findings of a National Governors' Association (NGA) survey on state initiatives to reduce reliance on welfare programs as an appendix. Bibliographies on both topics contain citations and abstracts to materials in the reference collection at the National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: https://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Aid to Families with Dependent Children, Educational change, Employment, Employment programs, Federal government, Immigrants, Program evaluation, Proposed legislation, State programs, Training, Welfare programs, Welfare reform

Lewis AC. 1995. Believing in ourselves: Progress and struggle in urban middle school reform, 1989-1995. New York, NY: Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, 125 pp.

Annotation: This book analyzes the results of a project funded by the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation to effect reform in urban middle schools, it is the third in a series of books about the five year project. The first two were called "Gaining Ground" and "Changing the Odds;" they reported on the conditions in the participating schools at the end of the second and fourth years. This book summarizes the project; it recounts efforts made to engage the affected parties: the teachers, professionals, principals, parents, and students. It also reviews the conditions affecting the reform process; it considers the interactions between various controlling forces affecting the process, assessment techniques, the unions, and the role of the school district administrators. A final section of the book considers future policy implications.

Contact: Edna McConnell Clark Foundation, 415 Madison Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10017, Telephone: (212) 551-9100 Contact Phone: (212) 551-9100 Fax: (212) 421-9325 E-mail: info@emcf.org Web Site: http://www.emcf.org/ Available in libraries.

Keywords: Development, Educational change, Middle schools, Parent participation, Policies, Policy development, Principals, Professional personnel, Reform, Students, Teachers, Urban schools

Gibbs J. 1994. Tribes: A new way of learning together. Santa Rosa, CA: Center Source Publications, 432 pp.

Annotation: This manual advances an educational theory called Tribes which encourages teachers to develop a community that values individual differences while encouraging each member to contribute based on their unique gifts. The theory moves across socioeconomic and ethnic differences and encourages children to discover different perspectives. The manual discusses moving toward a new pattern of interaction, reviews how children learn, describes the Tribes concept, and indicates ways to create a learning community and build Tribes within them. The manual also examines methods for developing self-worth and eliciting participation, designing and implementing learning experiences, applying the theory to middle schools, and integrating the theory in the larger school environment. The manual also includes information on strategies, resources, and supporting materials.

Keywords: Child development, Cultural diversity, Curriculum development, Educational change, Group dynamics, Self esteem, Social development

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.