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Strengthen the Evidence for Maternal and Child Health Programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 5 (5 total).

Force J. n.d.. Project Copernicus [Final report]. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, 15 pp.

Annotation: Project Copernicus, a dual-State initiative for Maryland and Virginia, developed, demonstrated, and evaluated training programs in family-centered service coordination with target groups of professional service providers and parents in urban, rural, and suburban areas of Maryland and Virginia. Project Copernicus demonstrated how to provide family-centered care for families with children with special health needs by assisting both parents and professional service providers to develop and use family-centered service coordination activities (case management). [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB97-121859.

Keywords: Access to Health Care, CSHCN, Case Management, Chronic illnesses and disabilities, Coordination of Health Care, Disabled, Education of Health Professionals, Families, Family-Centered Health Care, Fragmentation of Services, Parent Education, Parents, programs

Anderson B. n.d.. Collaboration Among Parents and Health Professionals (CAPP) [Final report]. Boston, MA: Federation for Children with Special Needs, 66 pp.

Annotation: This project worked with the Technical Assistance for Parent Programs Project and the U.S. Office of Special Education Resources in order to increase and enhance parent involvement in the health care of children with disabilities and special health needs. The project sought to (1) prepare parents to assume an integral role in the health care of their children with disabilities; (2) promote effective communication and collaboration among health care professionals and parents in order to enhance health services for children; and (3) develop a national support system to ensure that parents have access to essential information and peer support. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-152940.

Keywords: 99-457 Financing Intervention, Early Association for the Care of Children's Health (ACCH) Parent Networks, Health Professionals, L, Parent Education Parent Professional Communication Peer Support P, Parents

Fordham Interdisciplinary Parent Representation Project. [2012]. Guide to working with young parents in out of home care. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 50 pp.

Annotation: This guide provides information and guidance for working with pregnant and parenting youth, helping them as they develop both as individuals and as parents through positive casework interactions. The guide encourages a strengths-based approach to ensure the safety of both young parents and their children. It offers suggestions for engaging young parents in conferencing and supportive services while highlighting the importance of maintaining a young parent’s right to privacy and autonomy, and emphasize comprehensive planning for pregnant young people to promote well being, to minimize the need for court intervention, to ensure placement stability and to help young families move more quickly toward permanency. The guide is designed to be used primarily by provider agency case planners, but may also be useful to child protective staff, Family Services Unit staff, parent advocates, attorneys and others who work with this vulnerable population. Topics in planning and services for young parents in out of home care include: legal issues, father participation, collaborative planning and permanency, preventive services, child safety conferences, court intervention, pregnancy-related services, medical home visiting programs, parenting supports, counseling and mental health services, education, child care, and preparing a young parent for leaving foster care. Appendices provide resources for services in adolescent reproductive health, breastfeeding, the WIC program, support services and assistance, teen father support, mentoring and mental health, housing support, legal information, education, hoe visiting, and parenting education programs. Tips sheets are provided on mandatory reporting, early care and education, public housing, and transitional Medicaid.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

New York City Administration for Children's Services. 2012. ABCs of working with young parents in out of home care: Expectations, responsibilities and resources. New York, NY: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 4 pp.

Annotation: This document is a source of information and guidance for case planners in New York City in their work with parenting youth and youth planning for the arrival of their baby in foster care, and in developing appropriate service plans for these youth. It discusses roles for agency case planners in referring both expecting mothers and fathers of health and support systems, discussing the role of resource parents for minors who are expecting, securing a stable placement for expecting youth before baby arrives, as well as developing and executing permanency plans for young parents in out-of-home care. Additional information is provided on health care testing and decision-making, legal aspects of pregnancy and parenting, and understanding funding for baby's essential needs. A practice guide summary is included along with resources for community based services, housing and child care, child welfare services, medical mentoring for pregnant and parenting youth, and prevention services.

Contact: New York City Administration for Children's Services, 150 William Street, New York, NY 10038, Telephone: (212) 341-0900 Secondary Telephone: (877) KIDSNYC E-mail: http://nyc.gov/html/mail/html/mailacs.html Web Site: http://www.nyc.gov/html/acs Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Adolescents, Child welfare, Family support services, Foster care, New York, Out of home care, Parent education, Social services, State initiatives, Youth in transition programs

Glasser M. 1988. Network of Services for Families with Chronically Ill Children [Final report]. San Francisco, CA: University of California, San Francisco, 3 pp.

Annotation: This network sought to improve the care of children and adolescents with hemophilia and cystic fibrosis. To this end, the network developed a computerized medical information system which allowed health professionals to quickly enter and retrieve patient information. It also provided a series of workshops for parents on psychosocial issues. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147122.

Keywords: Chronically Ill, Cystic fibrosis, Data Bases, Education of Parents, Families, Hemophilia, Networking, Parent Networks, Stress

   

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.