Skip Navigation

Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

Search Results: MCHLine

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (212 total).

Fleming E, Afful J. 2018. Prevalence of total and untreated dental caries among youth: United States, 2015–2016. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics, 7 pp. (NCHS data brief; no. 307)

Annotation: This data brief presents the prevalence of total and untreated caries in primary or permanent teeth among children and adolescents ages 2–19 for 2015–2016 and trends from 2011–2012 through 2015–2016. Along with key findings, the brief offers information on prevalence differences by race and Hispanic origin and income level for 2015–2016.

Contact: National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3311 Toledo Road, Room 5419, Hyattsville, MD 20782, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (301) 458-4020 E-mail: nchsquery@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs

Keywords: Dental caries, Early childhood caries, Economic factors, Oral health, Racial factors, Statistical data, Trends

Utah Children. 2016. Measures of child well-being in Utah. Salt Lake City, UT: Utah Children, annual.

Annotation: This annual statistical summary provides information on the health, education, safety, and economic security of children in Utah. The introduction includes general demographic information about the state and presents a long-range view of what factors contribute to a family's well-being. Analytical essays are included for each category of data reviewed and the statistics are presented in tables by county with state totals. This publication continues "Key Facts," which was published between 1990 and 1994.

Contact: Voices for Utah Children, 747 East South Temple, Suite 100, Salt Lake City, UT 84102, Telephone: (801) 364-1182 Secondary Telephone: (877) 445-2447 Fax: (801) 364-1186 E-mail: karen@utahchildren.org Web Site: http://www.utahchildren.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Child safety, Children, Data, Demographics, Education, Family economics, Health status, Socioeconomic factors, Utah

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation framework: Nutrition, physical activity, and obesity prevention indicators–Interpretive guide to the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 320 pp.

Annotation: This guide for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) administrators, evaluators, and others identifies and explains the indicators, outcome measures, and preferred methodologies for tracking success; developing state- and local-level objectives; and reporting program results. Contents include outcome indicators relevant to individuals, environmental settings, sectors of influence, population results, and social norms and values.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

Pinderhughes H, Davis RA, Williams M. 2016. Adverse community experiences and resilience: A framework for addressing and preventing community trauma. Oakland, CA: Prevention Institute, 34 pp., exec. summ (6 pp.)

Annotation: This paper explores trauma at the population level and how it impacts efforts to prevent violence and improve other aspects of community health. The paper also presents a framework for addressing and preventing trauma at the community level. Topics include the community environment, the production of trauma from violence, community strategies to address community violence, elements of a resilient community, and promoting community resilience.

Contact: Prevention Institute, 221 Oak Street, Oakland, CA 94607, Telephone: (510) 444-7738 Fax: (510) 663-1280 E-mail: prevent@#preventioninstitute.org Web Site: http://www.preventioninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community action, Culturally competent services, Economic factors, Emotional trauma, Geographic factors, Health promotion, Models, Prevention programs, Resilience, Social conditions, Social support, Sociocultural factors, Standards, Trauma, Trauma care, Violence prevention

Woolf SH, Aron L, Chapman DA, Dubay L, Zimerman E, Snellings LC, Hall L, Haley AD, Holla N, Ayers K, Lowenstein C, Waidmann TA. 2016. The health of the states: How U.S. states compare in health status and the factors that shape health–Summary report. Richmond, VA: Virginia Commonwealth University Center on Society and Health; Washington, DC: Urban Institute, 53 pp.

Annotation: This report, and accompanying supplemental reports, present findings on the status of Americans' health at the state level, along with the diverse factors associated with health. The report examines how state-level variations in health outcomes correlate with variations in factors thought to shape or influence health (health determinants) from five domains including health behaviors, health systems, economic and social factors, physical and social environmental factors, and public policies and social spending. Contents include research and policy priorities emerging from the analysis. Maps and charts are included.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data analysis, Decision making, Economics, Geographic factors, Health behaviors, Health status, Health systems, Life course, Protective factors, Public policy, Risk factors, Social factors

Bennett KJ, Lin Y-H, Yuen M, Leonhirth D, Probst JC. 2016. Vulnerable rural counties: The changing rural landscape, 2000–2010. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 21 pp. (Findings brief.)

Annotation: This brief describes demographics of rural America including trends in declining income, population, and health care resources. The brief also explores policy approaches that can serve to ameliorate losses in health care services.

Contact: South Carolina Rural Health Research Center, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, Telephone: (803) 251-6317 Fax: (803) 251-6399 Web Site: http://rhr.sph.sc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Economic factors, Health services, Measures, Policy development, Population dynamics, Poverty, Rural environment, Rural populations, Statistical data, Trends

U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators, and National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research. 2016. SNAP-Ed strategies & interventions: An obesity prevention toolkit for states–Featuring evidence-based policy, systems, and environmental changes that support direct education and social marketing and ways to evaluate them across various settings. Alexandria, VA: U.S. Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service, 52 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help states improve the likelihood that individuals with low incomes will make healthy food choices within a limited budget and choose physically active lifestyles consistent with current guidelines by providing nutrition education and obesity prevention services, using interventions that include direct education; social marketing; and policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) changes. Contents include evidence-based obesity prevention programs and PSE strategies and interventions that states can use in their plans to comply with the requirement that plans include multi-level interventions or public health approaches. The toolkit includes a section on evaluation of interventions that may be considered along with evaluation recommendations and requirements.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Weight management

Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Centers of Excellence, Southern Region at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2016. SNAP-Ed toolkit: Obesity prevention interventions and evaluation framework. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, multiple items.

Annotation: This resource is designed to help Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program (SNAP-Ed) implementing agencies find evidence-based obesity prevention and policy, systems, and environmental change (PSE) interventions and learn about outcome indicators from the SNAP-Ed evaluation framework. A glossary of terms from the framework is also included. An online resource center for state and local SNAP-Ed providers and a library for locating SNAP-Ed tools and resources are also available.

Contact: U.S. Food and Nutrition Service, 3101 Park Center Drive, Alexandria, VA 22302, Web Site: http://www.fns.usda.gov/fns Available from the website.

Keywords: Disease prevention, Economic factors, Food consumption, Food habits, Intervention, Low income groups, Model programs, Nutrition education, Obesity, Physical activity, Prevention programs, Prevention services, Program evaluation, Program improvement, State programs, Training, Weight management

U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2015. The health and well-being of children in rural areas: A portrait of the nation. Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 61 pp. (The national survey of children's health)

Annotation: This chartbook presents data from the National Survey of Children's Health. Contents include indicators of the health and well-being of children, including oral health status; a discussion of supportive and risk factors in the family environment; and a discussion of aspects of neighborhoods that may support or threaten families and children on the national level within high-risk subpopulations for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Supplemental data tables on child health status, health care, school and activities, a child's family, and a child's and family's neighborhood are also available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Web Site: https://mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child health, Children, Families, Family characteristics, Family economics, Health care utilization, Health insurance, Health status, National surveys, Neighborhoods, Protective factors, Risk factors, Rural population, Schools, Socioeconomic status, Statistical data

Chester A, Alker J. 2015. Medicaid at 50: A look at the long-term benefits of childhood Medicaid. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, Center for Children and Families, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report looks at the body of research that shows how Medicaid coverage for children has resulted in better health, lower rates of mortality, and better educational and economic outcomes, as well as a significant return on investment for government.

Contact: Georgetown University Health Policy Institute, Center for Children and Families, 3300 Whitehaven Street, N.W., Suite 5000, Box 571444, Washington, DC 20057-1485, Telephone: (202) 687-0880 Fax: (202) 687-3110 E-mail: childhealth@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://ccf.georgetown.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Child health, Costs, Economic factors, Health status, Medicaid, Outcome and process assessment

PolicyLink and University of Southern California, Program for Environmental and Regional Equity. 2014–. National equity atlas. Oakland, CA: PolicyLink, 1 v.

Annotation: This tool provides data on demographic changes and racial and economic inclusion for the largest 150 regions, in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the United States as a whole. Contents include data summaries that provide a snapshot of how a community is doing on key indicators of demographic change and equity; charts, graphs, and maps; and stories about how local leaders are using equity data to catalyze conversations and implement equitable growth strategies and policies.

Contact: PolicyLink, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 303, Oakland, CA 94612, Telephone: (510) 663-2333 Fax: (510) 663-9684 E-mail: info@policylink.org Web Site: http://www.policylink.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Community action, Cultural diversity, Data analysis, Economic factors, Equal opportunities, Geographic regions, Inclusion, Policy development, Racial factors, Social change, Statewide planning, Statistical data

Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2014. The Healthy Babies Initiative resources and case studies. Arlington, VA: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources describe state initiatives focused on improving birth outcomes. Contents include fact sheets, issue briefs, and case studies of prevention initiatives and programs that have had a positive economic impact. Topics include smoking cessation for women, maternal and infant disparities, infant mortality, prematurity and low birth weight, early elective deliveries, preconception and interconception care, nutrition and gestational diabetes, training, home visiting, newborn screening, medical home, family planning, breastfeeding, safe sleep, and life course.

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Economic factors, Infants, MCH programs, Pregnancy outcome, Pregnant women, Prevention programs, Program improvement, Resources for professionals, State initiatives

Kearney MS, Levine PB. 2014. Media influences on social outcomes: The impact of MTV's 16 and pregnant on teen childbearing. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 43 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 19795)

Annotation: This paper explores the impact of a reality television series, MTV's 16 and Pregnant, on adolescent attitudes and outcomes. Contents include background information on the show's content and previous research on the impact of media exposure; a description of the data including Nielson ratings, Google trends, and Twitter activity; a descriptive analysis of adolescents' exposure to the show; and analyses of high frequency data on searches and tweets and data on adolescent births. Topics include changes in searches and tweets, geographic variation in viewership, and changes in adolescent birth rates.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org $5.

Keywords: , Abortion, Adolescent attitudes, Attitude change, Behavior modification, Contraception, Economic factors, Health behavior, Interactive media, Media, Outcome evaluation, Sexual behavior

U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2014. Medicaid: Demographics and service usage of certain high-expenditure beneficiaries. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 43 pp.

Lombardi J, Mosle A, Patel N, Schumacher R, Stedron J. 2014. Gateways to two generations: The potential for early childhood programs and partnerships to support children and parents together. Washington, DC: Aspen Institute, Ascend, 26 pp.

Annotation: This document explores the two-generation framework, which focuses on creating opportunities for and meeting the needs of vulnerable children and their parents together, and the potential that early childhood development programs have to be gateways for two-generation approaches. Topics include the core components of two-generation approaches (economic supports, education, and social capital); a history of engaging parents in early childhood; the progression of thinking about parents in early childhood development; two-generation approaches in early childhood programs; and state- and community-level initiatives.

Contact: Aspen Institute, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036-1133, Telephone: (202) 736-5800 Fax: (202) 467-0790 Web Site: http://www.aspeninstitute.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Economic factors, Education factors, History, Intergenerational programs, Local initiatives, Models, Social change, Social factors, Social support, State programs, Young children

My Brother's Keeper Task Force. 2014. My Brother's Keeper Task Force report to the president. Washington, DC: Executive Office of the President, 61 pp.

Annotation: This report describes progress on a national initiative to address persistent opportunity gaps faced by boys and young men of color. The report outlines the building blocks for success across key life stages and presents initial recommendations and areas of opportunity for each of the key milestones. The focus areas include entering school ready to learn, reading at grade level by third grade, graduating from high school ready for college and career, completing postsecondary education or training, entering the work force, reducing violence, and providing a second chance. Cross-cutting areas of opportunity that span all focus areas are also discussed.

Contact: White House, Executive Office of the President, Web Site: http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent males, Barriers, Cultural factors, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Graduation, Juvenile justice, Learning, Life course, Men, Minority groups, Reading, School to work transition, Social factors, Violence prevention, Work family issues, Work force, Young adults

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2014. Economic analysis of LARC programs. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes the types of cost analyses, previous study methodology, and the steps associated with evaluating long acting reversible contraception (LARC) programs that demonstrate a return on investment (ROI). The brief describes differences between ROI and cost effective analyses and steps to consider for a LARC ROI analysis. Topics include defining the perspective and timeframe; identifying costs, outcomes, data sources, and estimated rates; calculating results; and messaging.

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Contraceptive devices, Cost effectiveness, Economic factors, Financing, MCH programs, Program evaluation

D'Angelo AV, Rich L, Kwiatt J. 2013. Integrating family support services into schools: Lessons from the Elev8 Initiative. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief uses data from Chapin Hall’s evaluation of the Elev8 Full-Service Schools Initiative as a case study to focus on the challenges and benefits of offering economic support services to low income families at schools. Based on their findings, the authors conclude that the Elev8 Initiative, which brings together schools, families, and the community in underserved neighborhoods, shows promise as a way to provide support services to families while improving the educational opportunities for their children. Using lessons learned from the Eval8 Initiativ, the authors present recommendations for future efforts to integrate economic support services into schools. Their suggested strategies include hiring long-term staff members to build trusting relationships with parents; offering economic support services in conjunction with a broader array of services; ensuring clear lines of communication between partner organizations; and taking steps to ensure parents’ privacy.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community based services, Economic factors, Educational factors, Evaluation, High risk children, Initiatives, Low income groups, Models, Partnerships, School-linked programs

Johnston J and Stratus. 2013. Putting children first: Scenarios for the future of children's health and well being in the U.S.. Palo Alto, CA: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 35 pp. (Report)

Annotation: This report provides an overview of the process by which scenarios about the future of children's health and well-being were created for a forum of philanthropists and children' health experts held in Aspen, CO, in July 2012. The report shares the scenarios, which paint four different portraits of how the state of children's health and well-being could evolve over the next several decades. The report also shares insights and implications that emerged from participants' interactions with the scenarios at the forum, as well as how these scenarious might be used to empower new actions and strategies for transforming the future of children's health and well-being.

Contact: Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health, 400 Hamilton Avenue, Suite 340, Palo Alto, CA 94301, Telephone: (650) 497-8365 E-mail: info@lpfch.org Web Site: http://www.lpfch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child development, Child health, Economic factors, Educational factors, Families, Family support services, Health services, Low income groups, Social factors, Social services, Trends

Kim FM. 2013. Economic viability of dental therapists. Boston, MA: Community Catalyst, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report assesses the work of dental health aide therapists (DHATs) in Alaska and dental therapists (DTs) in Minnesota, including time spent on different categories of procedures, characteristics of the population base served, and overall cost to practices of employing DHATs and DTs. Data on procedure types (evaluation and assessment, preventive, restorative, and other) that DHATs and DTs perform and on revenue that DHATs and DTs generate are presented in a series of charts throughout the document. The report concludes with a summary table showing the distribution of procedures and generated revenue.

Contact: Community Catalyst, 30 Winter Street, 10th Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 338-6035 Fax: (617) 451-5838 E-mail: restuccia@communitycatalyst.org Web Site: http://www.communitycatalyst.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska, Case studies, Dental care, Economic factors, Minnesota, Oral health, State programs, Statistical data, Work force

    Next Page »

This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.