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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (122 total).

Partridge S. n.d.. PROJECT AIMS [Final report]. Portland, ME: University of Southern Maine, 37 pp.

Annotation: Project AIMS worked to strengthen the capacity of Maine's service system (including P.L. 99-457 efforts) to meet the emotional health needs of young children (birth to 5 years old) and their families. The project objectives were to: (1) Establish a multidisciplinary network of project associates; (2) develop and field-test an emotional health brief assessment tool for children birth to 5 years old; (3) recommend to the service network methods of conducting comprehensive psychosocial assessments of children/families with emotional difficulties; and (4) strengthen treatment services which facilitate attachment, interaction, mastery, and support within families. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-158608.

Keywords: 99-457, Community-Based Health Services, Coordination of Health Care, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Emotional Health, High risk children, High risk groups: Families, L, P, Parent-Child Interaction, Screening Tools

U.S. Office of Head Start. 2016–. Head Start policy and regulations. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Head Start, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for Head Start agencies that provide services to children and families describe program performance standards and the requirements set forth in the Head Start Act of 2007. Topics include program governance, financial and administrative requirements, administrative procedures, and definitions. Information about program operations including oral health services are provided. Additional resources for grantees include information memoranda, program instructions, and information about fiscal regulations.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Community based services, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, Costs, Early childhood education, Early intervention programs, Educational programs, Federal legislation, Fiscal management, Head Start, Health programs, Oral health, Prevention programs, Program budgeting, Program coordination, Program development, Program management, Psychosocial development, Regulations, Standards, Young Children

Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health and Autism Speaks. 2016. Experience matters: A view into the health and wellbeing of US children and families with autism spectrum disorder. Baltimore, MD: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, 117 pp.

Annotation: This chartbook for families, advocates, policymakers, and researchers provides a national portrait of how children in the United States receive their diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), how their daily lives are impacted, and how their families are doing. Topics include the prevalence of ASD, diagnosing ASD, the child's health, health care and related services, school and social wellbeing, and coping with ASD. The appendices contain information on the ASD data presented in the chartbook including a glossary, a crosswalk of the data sources, methodological information, and guidance for accessing the data. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health, Child and Adolescent Health Measurement Initiative, The Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, MD 21205, E-mail: info@cahmi.org Web Site: https://childhealthdata.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents with special health care needs, Autism, Child health, Child with special health care needs, Coping, Data sources, Diagnosis, Early intervention services, Family health, Prevalence, Relationships, Special health care services, Statistical data

Mariani M, Velazquez L, Kattlove J. 2016. Healthy mouth, healthy start: Improving oral health for young children and families through early childhood home visiting. Santa Monica, CA: Children's Partnership, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines how oral health is incorporated into the early childhood home visiting models that serve the largest number of young children in California: Healthy Families America, Nurse-Family Partnership, Parents as Teachers, Welcome Baby, and Early Head Start (home-based option). It makes the case for increasing efforts to promote oral health care in home-visiting programs and strengthening the relationship between the home-visiting community and the oral health community. The brief also articulates recommendations for next steps that home-visiting programs can take to continue addressing oral health disparities among young children and pregnant women.

Contact: Children's Partnership, 1351 Third Street Promenade, Suite 206, Santa Monica, CA 90401-1321, Telephone: (310) 260-1220 Fax: (310) 260-1921 E-mail: frontdoor@childrenspartnership.org Web Site: http://www.childrenspartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Dental care, Early Head Start, Early intervention, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Health education, Health promotion, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Model programs, Oral health, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Relationships, State programs, Young children

Love HL, Schelar E, Taylor K, Schlitt J, Even M, Burns A, Mackey S, Couillard M, Danaux J, Mizzi A, Surti D, Windham D. 2015. 2013–14 digital census report. Washington, DC: School-Based Health Alliance, 1 v.

Annotation: This report presents findings from a national survey of centers and programs connected with schools to document the role of school-based health centers (SBHCs) in meeting the health care needs of children and adolescents. The report describes the funding sources that support the SBHCs, policies, and characteristics of schools where SBHCs are located. The analysis and data presented in the report include SBHCs that pro- vide primary care. Topics include growth; access; comprehensive care, including behavioral health and oral health care; adolescent care; health system partnerships; sustainability; and accountability. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: School-Based Health Alliance, 1010 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 600, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 638-5872 Secondary Telephone: (888) 286-8727 Fax: (202) 638-5879 E-mail: info@nasbhc.org Web Site: http://www.sbh4all.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data, Early intervention, Mental health services, National surveys, Oral health, Participation, Preventive health services, Primary care, Reproductive health, School based clinics

National Institute of Mental Health, Office of Autism Research Coordination. 2014. Report to Congress on activities related to autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities under the Combating Autism Act of 2006 and Combating Autism Reauthorization Act of 2011 (FY2010–FY2012). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 104 pp.

Annotation: This annual report, required by public law, describes progress and expenditures made in autism spectrum disorder (ASD)-related research and services activities across the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Science Foundation. Topics include progress and expenditures; prevalence of ASD; average age of diagnosis; average age for intervention; average time between screening, diagnosis, and intervention; effectiveness and outcomes of interventions; and adult services and supports. The appendices contain a list of acronyms, a summary of the previous report, and related publications.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Interagency Autism Coordinating Committee, 200 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20201, E-mail: iaccpublicinquiries@mail.nih.gov Web Site: http://iacc.hhs.gov/ Available from the website. Document Number: DHHS 14-8012.

Keywords: Autism, Costs, Early intervention, Family support services, Federal legislation, Interagency cooperation, Prevalence, Research, Screening, Treatment outcome

Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive!. 2014. Birth to 5: Watch Me Thrive!. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, multiple items.

Annotation: This website describes a federal coordinated effort to encourage healthy child development,universal developmental and behavioral screening for children, and support for the families and providers who care for them. Contents include information about the importance of developmental and behavioral screening, the Compendium of Screening Measures for Young Children, and a list of accompanying guides tailored for use by early care and education providers, early intervention service and early childhood special education providers, families, primary care providers, communities, child welfare, home visitors, behavioral health providers, and housing and homeless shelter providers. Resources are available in English and Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Developmental disabilities, Developmental screening, Early intervention services, Family support services, Federal initiatives, Infant development, Infants, Measures, Spanish language materials, Young children

National Academy for State Health Policy. 2014. Supporting high performance in early entry into prenatal care fact sheets. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, Multiple items.

Annotation: This series of fact sheets showcase state policies and programs in four states -- California, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Washington -- that support improvement in early entry into prenatal care. The fact sheets also highlight how federally-qualified health centers in these states are leveraging the state policies and programs to promote early entry into prenatal care as part of a patient-centered medical home.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Community health centers, Early intervention, Illinois, Massachusetts, Medical home, Perinatal services, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program improvement, Public policy, State programs, Washington

Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2014. State developmental screening and early identification performance measures. Washington, DC: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet lists performance measures and objectives related to the goals and priorities of developmental screening and early identification in states. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, 1825 K Street, N.W., Suite 250, Washington, DC 20006-1202, Telephone: (202) 775-0436 Fax: (202) 478-5120 E-mail: info@amchp.org Web Site: http://www.amchp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Developmental screening, Early intervention, Health services delivery, Measures, Special health care services

Zero to Three. (2013). Improving access to early identification and intervention: 211 LA County developmental screening and care coordination. [Washington, DC]: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on the efforts of 211 L.A. County's Developmental Screening and Care Coordination Program, which works to encourage partnerships between health professionals and community organizations to identify children at risk for developmental delays. The brief provides information about the program and about the importance of identifying developmental delays early. A personal story about a parent and child who received help from the program is also included.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child development, Children with developmental disabilities, Collaboration, Community programs, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Health services, Infant development, Infants, Infants with developmental disabilities, Screening, Diagnosis, Treatment, Service coordination, Young children

Behrens D, Lear JG, Price OA. 2013. Improving access to children's mental health care: Lessons from a study of eleven states. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report describes research to identify systemic challenges to ensuring children's access to mental health care common among many states and points to examples of success. The report discusses the past 20 years in children's mental health, policies and programs that support children's mental health, key findings, and how to improve access to care.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Early intervention, Financing, Health insurance, Legislation, Mental health services, Prevention, Programs, Public policy, Research, State programs

Sontag-Padilla L, Schultz D, Reynolds KA, Lovejoy SL, Firth R. 2013. Maternal depression: Implications for systems serving mother and child. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 8 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights evidence on the impact of maternal depression on the mother and child as it relates to the public-sector systems that serve them and discusses potential short- and long-term cost implications. This brief describes a supplemental component of the Helping Families Raise Healthy Children initiative implemented in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, which successfully implements depression screening in early intervention, develops cross-system referral processes, engages caregivers in services, and increases local capacity for providing relationship-based services by addressing many of the barriers identified in earlier stages of the collaborative’s work.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Early interventions services, Local initiatives, Maternal mental health, Mother child relations, Pennsylvania, Postpartum depression

National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, National Association for the Education of Homeless Children. 2013. Early care and education for young children experiencing homelessness. Greensboro, NC: National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE; National Association for the Education of Homeless Children, 14 pp. (Best practices in homeless education brief series)

Annotation: This brief provides information and suggests best practices to increase the enrollment of and provision of services to families with young children experiencing homelessness. It presents an overview of the problem; describes legislation and programs that support homeless children; and explains how schools, service provider agencies, and early childhood programs can collaborate to help overcome the barriers hat separate young homeless children and families from the support they need. Included is a table listing programs that include provisions for homeless children, including the services provided, eligibility, and contact information.

Contact: National Center for Homeless Education, SERVE, P.O. Box 5367, Greensboro, NC 27435, Telephone: (800) 308-2145 Fax: (336) 315-7457 E-mail: homeless@serve.org Web Site: http://center.serve.org/nche/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early intervention, Family support services, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Young children

Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability. 2013. Autism plan for Georgia. Atlanta, GA: Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a plan for improving access to comprehensive, coordinated health care and related services for children, youth, and adults with autism spectrum disorder and related developmental disabilities in Georgia. The plan addresses the following ten areas of activity: early identification and screening; referral and diagnosis; medical, behavioral health, and dental services; family support; early intervention and preschool services; elementary and secondary education; community services and supports; transition from youth to adult systems; adult services and supports; and emergency preparedness and first responders. For each area, the report provides a definition, quality indicators (problem statements and data drivers), and recommendations (objectives). The report also describes foundational supports considered in developing the recommendations including work force, awareness, informational resources, finances, and policy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Georgia State University School of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 75 Piedmont Avenue, Suite 514, Atlanta, GA 30303, Telephone: (404) 413-1281 Fax: (404) 413-1012 E-mail: cld@gsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Autism, Community based services, Comprehensive health care, Diagnosis, Disaster planning, Early intervention, Educational objectives, Family centered care, Family support services, Financial planning, Georgia, Health care delivery, Life course, Policy development, Program coordination, Referrals, Screening, Special health care needs, State programs, Systems development, Transition planning, Work force

Russ S, Allen D, Fleischfresser S, Green C, White K, DesGeorges J, Aquino E, Errichetti K, Homer C. [2011]. Improving systems: Changing futures–Engaging Title V, families and clinical partners in improving the system of care for children and youth with special health care needs. [Boston, MA]: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes joint work undertaken by Title V, clinical teams, and families to improve state systems of care for children with epilepsy and for infants needing follow-up after newborn hearing screening using a quality improvement approach. The report describes the approach; aims, changes, and measures; lessons learned; change strategies; data collection; and the role of families in quality improvement. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Community based services, Early intervention services, Education, Epilepsy, Families, Health care systems, National initiatives, Newborn hearing screening, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Special health care needs, Statewide planning, Title V programs, Training, Young adults

South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Oral Health Division. 2011. Fluoride varnish manual for health professionals [upd. ed.]. Columbia, SC: South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Division of Oral Health, 7 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes the role of health professionals in applying fluoride varnish to the teeth of children at high to medium risk for dental caries. Contents include information on training and supplies, positioning of infants and young children for varnish application, and the importance of establishing a dental home. Resources for consumers are also provided.

Contact: South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Division of Oral Health, 2600 Bull Street, Columbia, SC 29201, Telephone: (803) 898-3432 Web Site: https://www.scdhec.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Dental care, Early intervention services, Fluorides, Manuals, Oral health, Young children

U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. 2011. Helping children and youth who have experienced traumatic events: National Children's Mental Health Awareness Day—May 3, 2011. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 4 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on the behavioral and emotional symptoms often displayed by children who have experienced traumatic events such as violence, physical or sexual abuse, war, loss of a loved one, living with an impaired caregiver, or having a life-threatening injury or illness. Written to coincide with National Children's Mental Health Awareness Day (May 3, 2011), the report describes the scope of the problem among children and youth; describes federal initiatives to improve services available to children and youth who have experienced trauma; and outlines four common types of treatment that address traumatic stress. The report highlights some of the mental health benefits that have resulted from services provided through the Children's Mental Health initiative, established by an Act of Congress in 1992, and National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. It highlights the state of Maine's THRIVE initiative -- a program funded through a grant from the SAMHSA that serves children who are involved in child protective services.

Contact: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (877) SAMHSA-7 Secondary Telephone: (877) 726-4727 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.samhsa.gov Available from the website. Document Number: HHS Pub. No. SMA-11-4642.

Keywords: Child development, Child mental health, Early intervention services, Emotional trauma, Federal initiatives, Intervention, Model programs, Public awareness campaigns, Trauma

Hanlon C, Rosenthal J. 2011. Improving care coordination and service linkages to support healthy child development: Early lessons and recommendations from a five-state consortium. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes selected activities and interventions in the five states (Arkansas, Illinois, Minnesota, Oklahoma, and Oregon) that are part of the Assuring Better Child Health and Development (ABCD III) learning collaborative. Through ABCD III, the states are developing and testing models that can improve coordination of early childhood services in their states and provide models for others. The report includes a description of each state's project, discusses key early lessons, and provides early recommendations.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Intervention, Arkansas, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, High risk groups, Illinois, Minnesota, Oklahoma, Oregon, Service delivery systems, Services coordination, State programs, Young children

Oregon Center for Children and Youth with Special Health Needs. [2010]. CaCoon program. Portland, OR: Oregon Center for Children and Youth with Special Health Needs, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes The CaCoon (Care Coordination) Program, a is a service for families with children who have (or are at risk of having) a chronic health condition or disability. The brochure describes the various types of CaCoon services offered by public health nurses who are specially trained to care for children and youth with special needs. It explains how CaCoon nurses can provide screening services within the state and help families find information, locate financial assistance, and make referrals to early-intervention services and community resources. It describes who is eligible for CaCoon and where to turn for additional information on the program. It is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Oregon Center for Children and Youth with Special Health Needs, 707 South West Gaines Road, Portland, OR 97239, Telephone: (503) 494-8303 Secondary Telephone: (877) 307-7070 Fax: (503) 494-2755 E-mail: occyshn@ohsu.edu Web Site: http://www.ohsu.edu/xd/outreach/occyshn Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Early intervention programs, Family support services, Models, Nursing services, Oregon, Spanish language materials, State programs

Spielberger J, Rich L, Winje C, Scannell M. 2010. Supporting low-income parents of young children: The Palm Beach County Family Study fourth annual report. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 187 pp.

Annotation: This report presents finding from the fourth year of an evaluation conducted to determine how families use and are affected by Florida's Palm Beach County's system of prevention and early intervention services designed to promote and support the healthy development and school readiness of children from birth through age 8. The system so far has focused on families at high levels of poverty, adolescent pregnancy, crime, and child maltreatment. The report, carried out when the focal child was ages 3 to 3 1/2, looks at changes in family characteristics, service use, and selected maternal and child outcomes over time. It also provides information about opportunities, challenges, and recommendations for the county's effort, particularly in meeting the needs of foreign-born families and supporting the development of their children.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Early intervention, Evaluation, Families, Florida, Health promotion, Health services, Immigrants, Infant development, Infant health, Local programs, Poverty, Prevention, School readiness, Social services

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.