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Strengthening the evidence for maternal and child health programs

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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Digital Library.


Displaying records 1 through 20 (144 total).

Calkins R. n.d.. Planning and Establishment of a Parent-Child Development Center=Family Based Education Centers: [Final report]. Honolulu, HI: Kamehameha Schools/Bishop Estate Center for Development of Early Education, 50 pp.

Annotation: This project developed a model integrated service system of educational, health, and social service programs for families of Hawaiian children (prenatal to age 5 years) who are disproportionately at risk for health, social, and educational handicaps. Four Native Hawaiian Family Based Education Centers were established, with three core educational components: A home visiting program, a traveling preschool program, and a center-based preschool. Activities included conducting an extensive assessment of community needs and developing ongoing ties with institutions of higher learning in the State. Strong health promotion and social service programs complemented the educational focus, and a case management system helped families assess their own goals in each of these areas. Community participation and ownership of the program were critical components. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov Document Number: NTIS PB93-147023.

Keywords: Community-Based Education Programs, Data Collection, Early Intervention, Education, Family-Based, Hawaiians, Home Visiting, Infant Mortality, Learning Disabilities, Low Birthweight, Parents, Prenatal Care

American College of Rheumatology, Lupus Foundation of America. 2017. Be Fierce. Take Control™. Atlanta, GA: American College of Rheumatology; Washington, DC: Lupus Foundation of America, multiple items.

Annotation: This public health campaign website was launched with the goal of educating and empowering young African American and Latino women (including those ages 15-18), who are most at-risk for developing lupus, to be aware of it signs and symptoms. The campaign uses the web, social media, digital advertising, and audience engagement to reach young women and educate them about the signs and symptoms of lupus. The campaign website also provides tools and resources such as the Lupus Foundation of America’s “Could it Be Lupus?” interactive questionnaire so those with possible symptoms can learn how to take that next step and talk to their health care provider.

Contact: Lupus Foundation of America, 2000 L Street, N.W., Suite 410, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 349-1155 Secondary Telephone: (800) 558-0121 Fax: (202) 349-1156 Web Site: http://www.lupus.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Advocacy, African Americans, Autoimmune diseases, Early intervention programs, Empowerment, Ethnic factors, Hispanic Americans, Lupus erythematosus, Prevention programs, Public awareness campaigns, Reproductive health, Risk factors, Self care, Women's health

U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2017. Collaboration and coordination of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Part C programs. Washigton, DC: U.S. Department of Education; Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 27 pp.

Annotation: This joint statement sets a vision for stronger partnerships, collaboration, and coordination between awardees of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (MIECHV) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part C Program (IDEA Part C Program). It provides recommendations to States, territories, and tribal entities to identify and enhance opportunities for collaboration and coordination between MIECHV and the IDEA Part C Program.

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov

Keywords: Collaboration, Early intervention, Federal programs, Home visiting, State programs

U.S. Office of Head Start. 2016–. Head Start policy and regulations. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Head Start, multiple items.

Annotation: These resources for Head Start agencies that provide services to children and families describe program performance standards and the requirements set forth in the Head Start Act of 2007. Topics include program governance, financial and administrative requirements, administrative procedures, and definitions. Information about program operations including oral health services are provided. Additional resources for grantees include information memoranda, program instructions, and information about fiscal regulations.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: health@ecetta.info Web Site: https://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Administration, Community based services, Community programs, Comprehensive programs, Costs, Early childhood education, Early intervention programs, Educational programs, Federal legislation, Fiscal management, Head Start, Health programs, Oral health, Prevention programs, Program budgeting, Program coordination, Program development, Program management, Psychosocial development, Regulations, Standards, Young Children

Mariani M, Velazquez L, Kattlove J. 2016. Healthy mouth, healthy start: Improving oral health for young children and families through early childhood home visiting. Santa Monica, CA: Children's Partnership, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief examines how oral health is incorporated into the early childhood home visiting models that serve the largest number of young children in California: Healthy Families America, Nurse-Family Partnership, Parents as Teachers, Welcome Baby, and Early Head Start (home-based option). It makes the case for increasing efforts to promote oral health care in home-visiting programs and strengthening the relationship between the home-visiting community and the oral health community. The brief also articulates recommendations for next steps that home-visiting programs can take to continue addressing oral health disparities among young children and pregnant women.

Contact: Children's Partnership, 1351 Third Street Promenade, Suite 206, Santa Monica, CA 90401-1321, Telephone: (310) 260-1220 Fax: (310) 260-1921 E-mail: frontdoor@childrenspartnership.org Web Site: http://www.childrenspartnership.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, California, Dental care, Early Head Start, Early intervention, Health care disparities, Health disparities, Health education, Health promotion, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Model programs, Oral health, Pregnant women, Preventive health services, Relationships, State programs, Young children

Schmit S, Walker C. 2016. Disparate access: Head Start and CCDBG data by race and ethnicity. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 30 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights state-level data by race and ethnicity about differential access to Head Start preschool, Early Head Start, and Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG)-funded child care. Contents include background on eligibility and funding of Head Start and CCDBG, racial and ethnic diversity of young children, and young children in poverty; data on the percentage of eligible children served by program, race/ethnicity, and state; and potential policy implications and data gaps.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Block grants, Child care, Child development, Early Head Start, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Ethnic groups, Federal programs, Head Start, Infants, Low income groups, Service delivery, Statistics, Toddlers, Young children

Burwick A, Zaveri H, Shang L, Boller K, Daro D, Strong DA. 2014. Costs of early childhood home visiting: An analysis of programs implemented in the Supporting Evidence-based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment Initiative. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 43 pp., plus appendices.

Dunlap G, Smith BJ, Fox L, Blase K. 2014. Roadmap to statewide implementation of the Pyramid Model. Tampa, FL: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, 10 pp. (Roadmap to effective intervention practices; no. 6)

Annotation: This document provides a guide and suggested resources for statewide implementation of the Pyramid Model for Promoting Social Emotional Competence in Infants and Young Children. The document outlines key components of the model in the context of implementation stages (planning and installation, implementation, and scale-up and sustainability). Components include the state leadership team, master cadre for professional development, demonstration sites, behavior specialists, data and evaluation systems, and state benchmarks of quality. The document also describes measures and evaluation procedures that are tailored to the model. An accompanying document provides descriptions of the tools and how to use them.

Contact: Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children, Louis de la Parte Florida Mental Health Institute, University of South Florida, 13301 North Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MHC2-1134, Tampa, FL 33612-3807, Telephone: (813) 974-9803 E-mail: cureton@usf.edu Web Site: http://www.challengingbehavior.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Competence, Early intervention, Emotional development, Model programs, Psychosocial development, Service delivery systems, Social behavior, Statewide planning, Systems development, Young children

National Academy for State Health Policy. 2014. Supporting high performance in early entry into prenatal care fact sheets. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, Multiple items.

Annotation: This series of fact sheets showcase state policies and programs in four states -- California, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Washington -- that support improvement in early entry into prenatal care. The fact sheets also highlight how federally-qualified health centers in these states are leveraging the state policies and programs to promote early entry into prenatal care as part of a patient-centered medical home.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Community health centers, Early intervention, Illinois, Massachusetts, Medical home, Perinatal services, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program improvement, Public policy, State programs, Washington

Zero to Three. (2013). Improving access to early identification and intervention: 211 LA County developmental screening and care coordination. [Washington, DC]: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on the efforts of 211 L.A. County's Developmental Screening and Care Coordination Program, which works to encourage partnerships between health professionals and community organizations to identify children at risk for developmental delays. The brief provides information about the program and about the importance of identifying developmental delays early. A personal story about a parent and child who received help from the program is also included.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Child development, Children with developmental disabilities, Collaboration, Community programs, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Health services, Infant development, Infants, Infants with developmental disabilities, Screening, Diagnosis, Treatment, Service coordination, Young children

Behrens D, Lear JG, Price OA. 2013. Improving access to children's mental health care: Lessons from a study of eleven states. Washington, DC: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report describes research to identify systemic challenges to ensuring children's access to mental health care common among many states and points to examples of success. The report discusses the past 20 years in children's mental health, policies and programs that support children's mental health, key findings, and how to improve access to care.

Contact: Center for Health and Health Care in Schools, George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, 2175 K Street, N.W., Suite 200, Room 213, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 994-4895 E-mail: chhcs@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.healthinschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent mental health, Child mental health, Early intervention, Financing, Health insurance, Legislation, Mental health services, Prevention, Programs, Public policy, Research, State programs

Hickson M, Ettinger de Cuba S, Weiss I, Donofrio G, Cook J. 2013. Feeding our human capital: Food insecurity and tomorrow's workforce—Part II of II. Boston, MA: Boston Medical Center, Children's HealthWatch, 4 pp. (Research brief)

Annotation: This policy brief, which is the second in a two-part series, provides information about food insecurity among children and the work force of the future. The brief defines food insecurity and human capital and discusses problems associated with childhood food insecurity, how food insecurity is related to a child's chances of graduating from high school, the effects of failing to graduate from high school, how childhood food insecurity affects health in adulthood, costs of food insecurity to society, and how early childhood development programs and nutritional interventions can serve as an investment in human capital that strengthens the work force of the future.

Contact: Children's HealthWatch, Dowling Building, 771 Albany Street, Ground Floor, Boston, MA 02118, Telephone: (617) 414-6366 Fax: (617) 414-7915 E-mail: childrenshealthwatch@childrenshealthwatch.org Web Site: http://www.childrenshealthwatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adult health, Child development, Child health, Early childhood development, Educational attainment, Employment, Graduation, Hunger, Intervention, Low income groups, Nutrition, Prevention, Programs, School readiness, Work force, Young children

Regensten E, Lipper K. 2013. A framework for choosing a state-level early childhood governance system. Boston, MA: Build Initiative, 25 pp.

Annotation: This paper describes and analyzes different models of governance for state-level systems of early childhood programs and services for children from birth to age five. Based on interviews with government and non-government informants in the states of Michigan, Maryland, Minnesota, and California, the paper provides an overview of governance (including a conceptual definition, brief history, and model options) and examples of various state practices. Tables indicate which entities provide oversight and authority for specific state and federal programs, including Head Start, State Pre-K, and Home Visiting. The paper concludes with a discussion and recommendations of governance model options based on five values: coordination, coherence, sustainability, efficiency, and accountability.

Contact: Build Initiative, 89 South Street, Suite 700, Boston, MA 02111, Telephone: (617) 523-6565 E-mail: info@buildinitiative.org Web Site: http://www.buildinitiative.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Early intervention, Governing, Governing boards, Models, Program improvement, Service delivery systems, State agencies, State programs

Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability. 2013. Autism plan for Georgia. Atlanta, GA: Georgia State University school of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 29 pp.

Annotation: This document outlines a plan for improving access to comprehensive, coordinated health care and related services for children, youth, and adults with autism spectrum disorder and related developmental disabilities in Georgia. The plan addresses the following ten areas of activity: early identification and screening; referral and diagnosis; medical, behavioral health, and dental services; family support; early intervention and preschool services; elementary and secondary education; community services and supports; transition from youth to adult systems; adult services and supports; and emergency preparedness and first responders. For each area, the report provides a definition, quality indicators (problem statements and data drivers), and recommendations (objectives). The report also describes foundational supports considered in developing the recommendations including work force, awareness, informational resources, finances, and policy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Georgia State University School of Public Health, Center for Leadership in Disability, 75 Piedmont Avenue, Suite 514, Atlanta, GA 30303, Telephone: (404) 413-1281 Fax: (404) 413-1012 E-mail: cld@gsu.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, Autism, Community based services, Comprehensive health care, Diagnosis, Disaster planning, Early intervention, Educational objectives, Family centered care, Family support services, Financial planning, Georgia, Health care delivery, Life course, Policy development, Program coordination, Referrals, Screening, Special health care needs, State programs, Systems development, Transition planning, Work force

Colvard J, Schmit S. 2012. Expanding access to Early Head Start: State initiatives for infants and toddlers at risk. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy and Zero to Three, 18 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the diverse strategies of state efforts to expand and enhance access to Early Head Start (EHS) services for infants, toddlers, and their families and offers recommendations for states interested in expanding this program.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Early intervention programs, Families, Infants, Low income groups, State programs, Young children

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities. 2012. Legacy for Children [Program web site]. Atlanta, GA: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities,

Annotation: This website provides information about Legacy for Children, an evidence-based program whose aim is to improve child outcomes by promoting positive parenting among mothers of infants and young children with low incomes. Information is provided on the program's philosophy, how the program works, and the intervention. More information about program study sites is offered, and links to related pages are included.

Contact: National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, Telephone: (800) 232-4636 Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Early childhood development, Family support, Family support programs, Infant development, Infants, Intervention, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Programs, Young children

Powers S, ed. 2012. Supporting quality through evidence-based practices. Zero to Three 32(4),

Annotation: This special issue of Zero to Three presents varying perspectives on the concept and implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) in early childhood. Topics include using implementation science to improve outcomes for children, EBP and early childhood intervention in American Indian and Alaska Native communities, using EBP to support children and families experiencing homelessness, and distinctions between evidence-based treatment and evidence-based practice as a decision-making process. Foundations for professional development are also discussed.

Contact: ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $40.

Keywords: Continuing education, Decision making, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Evidence based health care, Model programs, Quality assurance, Research

Russ S, Allen D, Fleischfresser S, Green C, White K, DesGeorges J, Aquino E, Errichetti K, Homer C. [2011]. Improving systems: Changing futures–Engaging Title V, families and clinical partners in improving the system of care for children and youth with special health care needs. [Boston, MA]: National Initiative for Children's Healthcare Quality, 56 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes joint work undertaken by Title V, clinical teams, and families to improve state systems of care for children with epilepsy and for infants needing follow-up after newborn hearing screening using a quality improvement approach. The report describes the approach; aims, changes, and measures; lessons learned; change strategies; data collection; and the role of families in quality improvement. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Children's Health Quality, 30 Winter Street, Sixth Floor, Boston, MA 02108, Telephone: (617) 391-2700 Secondary Telephone: (866) 787-0832 Fax: (617) 391-2701 E-mail: info@nichq.org Web Site: http://www.nichq.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Community based services, Early intervention services, Education, Epilepsy, Families, Health care systems, National initiatives, Newborn hearing screening, Organizational change, Program improvement, Public health infrastructure, Quality assurance, Special health care needs, Statewide planning, Title V programs, Training, Young adults

Lazara A, Danaher J, Kraus R, Goode S, Hipps C, Festa C. 2011. Section 619 profile. (18th ed.). Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, 74 pp.

Annotation: This publication updates information provided by state coordinators on state policies, programs, and practices under the Preschool Grants Program (Section 619 of Part B) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Information includes: program administration, funding, interagency coordination, personnel, transition, monitoring, use of IEPs/ IFSPs, family-centered services, standards and outcomes, pre-kindergarten initiatives, initiatives for special populations, and services in least restrictive environments (LRE). The volume also includes a compilation of information on the Section 619 program from other sources: federal and state policies, data from www.ideadata.org, state training and TA systems, data on changes in children served by the program, and contact information for state and jurisdictional program coordinators.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Data, Early childhood education, Early intervention, Educational change, Federal grants, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part B, Preschool children, State programs

Danaher J, Goode S, Lazara A. 2011. Part C updates. (12th ed.). Chapel Hill, NC: National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System, annual.

Annotation: This publication provides a compilation of resources on the Early Intervention Program for Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities (Part C) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Section I contains information on Part C program administration, funding appropriations, and trend data related to the numbers of children served, the settings in which children receive services and the status of children exiting Part C. Section II contains information on Part C program implementation, including: states' Part C rules, regulations and policies; OSEP policy letters related to Part C; state requirements for Part C providers; state practices related to early identification of very young children with autism; promising practices for promoting the social-emotional well-being of infants and toddlers receiving early intervention services; and state efforts to meet the early childhood transition requirements of IDEA. Section III includes federal and state level Part C program contact information. Previous Editions of the Part C Updates are available from the website.

Contact: Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center, Campus Box 8040, UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8040, Telephone: (919) 962-2001 Secondary Telephone: (919) 843-3269 Fax: 919.966.7463 E-mail: ectacenter@unc.edu Contact E-mail: nectasta.nectas@mhs.unc.edu Web Site: http://ectacenter.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Children with special health care needs, Early intervention, Federal legislation, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part C, Infants with special health care needs, Program evaluation, Program management, State programs, Toddlers

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This project is supported by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) under grant number U02MC31613, MCH Advanced Education Policy, $3.5 M. This information or content and conclusions are those of the author and should not be construed as the official position or policy of, nor should any endorsements be inferred by HRSA, HHS or the U.S. Government.